October 25, 2014
   
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Knowing How Much Exercise a Soda “Costs” May Make You Reconsider
Alice G. Walton

It takes 50 minutes of running or five miles of walking to work off the 250 calories in a can of soda. Read more >


Minimizing Your Risk of Gestational Diabetes
Esther Entin, M.D.

Four lifestyle changes can reduce women's risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy by 80%. Read more >


Biceps, Triceps and White Matter: Exercising the Brain
Sami Hocine

The white matter in the brains of kids who are in good shape is denser and able to process information faster than those who aren't fit. Read more >


Active Commuting Offers Health — and Environmental — Benefits
Leslie Carr

Commuters who drive themselves to work weigh five to seven pounds more than those who walk or bike. Read more >


Running, Even for Just Five Minutes a Day, Helps the Heart
Alice G. Walton

Even just five minutes of running each day can boost heart health. Read more >


The Childhood Obesity Crisis: Who Is in Denial?
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Kids can have inaccurate ideas about their own weight. Parents, too. What helps. Read more >


Mixing Energy Drinks and Alcohol Can Make You Drink More
Alice G. Walton

When people mix energy drinks with alcohol, they tend to drink more. Read more >


Outdoor Time Breeds Fitness in Children
Esther Entin, M.D.

Time outside translates into more physical exercise. That brings better health. Read more >


For Kids, Sports Are about Much More than Just Winning
Alice G. Walton

For kids, winning isn’t the best part of sports. Knowing what is most important can keep them engaged — and fit. Read more >


Getting Active in Your 70s (or Later) Can Reduce the Risk of Disability
Alice G. Walton

Reduce your chances of landing in a nursing home -- walk a few blocks more. It may be all you need. Read more >


The Paleo Diet Is No Cure for Obesity, Appetite
Charlotte LoBuono

The Paleo diet may be popular, but it does not appear to curb appetite or reduce obesity. It's not without benefits, however. Read more >


Home Food Environment Affects the Quality of Your Diet
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Some homes are like Superfund sites -- toxic to healthy eating. A few changes can make eating better a lot easier. Read more >


Apathy, Inactivity, and Brain Atrophy
Esther Entin, M.D.

The prospect of dementia haunts people over 50, but what they ought to fear is apathy and inactivity. Read more >


No Duping the Anti-Dopers
Sami Hocine

Athletes using performance-enhancing drugs have been a step ahead of the agencies meant to police them. No more. Read more >


A Steep Rise in Diabetes Seen in Children and Teens in the U.S.
Esther Entin, M.D.

Kids are eating more and exercising less. The upshot is a huge increase in diabetes -- and medical costs. Read more >


Kids' Food Portions Mirror Parents' Food Portions
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Avoid that "finish your dinner" fight. Young children need smaller portions. Better they ask for more than not finish. Read more >


Active Moms Raise Active Kids
Esther Entin, M.D.

Parents' own activity levels have a big effect on how active — and healthy — their children will be. Read more >


Exercise Reduces Risk of Hospital Readmission In Patients With COPD
Charlotte LoBuono

If you have lung disease, you may think you should not be exercising, but nothing could be further from the truth. Read more >


Parents Have a Big Effect on Kids' Screen Time
Leslie Carr

Parents, you have more influence than you think when it comes to helping kids curb screen time. Use it. Read more >


Video Game Improves Ball Players' Vision and Skills
Charlotte LoBuono

A video game helped baseball players improve their vision. The results were seen on the field. Read more >


Weight in Kindergarten Predicts Obesity Later in Life
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

If your child is overweight, he or she needs your help. The weight isn't going to come off naturally. Read more >


Exercising More and Sitting Less, A Winning Combo for Heart
Alice G. Walton

OK, guys, time to stagger away from the tube and the nachos. There are risks associated with being a sedentary man. Read more >


Yoga's Benefits for Cancer Survivors
Alice G. Walton

Yoga can increase cancer survivors' energy, reduce fatigue, and lower inflammation at the cellular level. Read more >


A Different Approach to Self-Control
Neil Wagner

Our willpower can fail us when we are tired or stressed. But how we view the problem could be the problem. Read more >


Just an Extra 2,000 Steps per Day
Alice G. Walton

Simply walking an extra mile a day can reduce the risk of heart disease by about 10%. Read more >


Kids More Active With a Little Help From Their Friends
Esther Entin, M.D.

Peers can really affect how active -- or inactive -- a child is. Read more >


Fitness Declining Among Children and Teens Worldwide
Esther Entin, M.D.

Kids today are slower and less aerobically fit than their parents were. It's a global problem. Read more >


Back Injuries Common in Young Athletes
Neil Wagner

Overtraining is the main way kids injure themselves. Specializing in one sport is also a problem. Read more >


Exercise During Pregnancy Can Improve Infant Brain Development
Neil Wagner

Exercise makes pregnancy and childbirth easier. It also seems to boost infant brain development. Read more >


Vitamin D Alone Does Little For Bone Health
Charlotte LoBuono

Vitamin D may not be necessary for older women seeking to protect their bones. Read more >


Exercise Improves Teens' Academic Performance
Charlotte LoBuono

Teens who exercise moderately to vigorously every day do better academically. But no, running a 10K can't replace studying. Read more >


Do It Yourself: Simple Chores Around the House Boost Health
Alice G. Walton

Do-it-yourself work around the house can help keep the heart in shape. Read more >


Study Helps Dieters Choose the Best Weight-Loss Apps
Alice G. Walton

Your cell phone can be a valuable diet ally. Just be sure to use apps grounded in scientific evidence. Read more >


A Meth-Like Substance Is Found in Workout Supplements
Alice G. Walton

The fitness supplement, Craze, appears to have caused certain athletes to fail drug tests. Read more >


Even Light Exercise May Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Charlotte LoBuono

Walking an hour a day can cut the risk of breast cancer by a significant amount. Read more >


Irisin Helps Exercise Boost Body and Brain
Michael J. Gertner

Irisin, the magic molecule of the moment, turns bad fat into good and helps exercise boost the brain Read more >


Experts Urge Doctors to Treat Unhealthy Lifestyles Just Like a Disease
Alice G. Walton

Preventive medicine means treating unhealthy lifestyles just as you would treat disease. Read more >


Two Studes Find Exercise as Good or Better Than Drugs for Fighting Disease
Michael J. Gertner

Studies find that exercise's effects on disease equal and sometimes surpass those of drugs. Read more >


Severe Obesity On the Rise Among Kids and Teens
Charlotte LoBuono

The fattest kids are getting fatter. Parents and doctors need to step in to help. Read more >


Low T, Meet Low E: Scientists Begin to Unravel Factors in Male Menopause
Michael J. Gertner

Low T? Maybe, But it could be Low E that messing with your love life. Read more >


Even Short Bouts of High-Intensity Exercise Can Affect Weight and BMI
Charlotte LoBuono

Forget the long hours at the gym. A short bout of intense exercise may be all you need to keep the pounds off. Read more >


Driving to Work Raises Diabetes Risk
Charlotte LoBuono

Those who drive to work have a far higher risk of diabetes than those who walk or bike. Even a bus is better. Read more >


Could Your Sweet Tooth Be Killing You?
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Our ideas about the "right" amount of sugar in the diet may need adjusting. Weight is not the issue. Read more >


Vigorous Exercise a Few Times a Week Reduces the Risk of Stroke
Alice G. Walton

Exercising vigorously enough to sweat a few times a week can help you lower your risk for stroke. Read more >


AMA Diagnosis: Obesity Is A Disease
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Are the obese sick? The AMA thinks so, but what do the obese think? Read more >


When Good Hikes Go Bad
Neil Wagner

Over half of all hikers are seriously under-prepared. Here are 10 items you need to bring with you — even for a short hike. Read more >


Soda Bans Appear to Find Their Target
Alice G. Walton

So-called “soda bans” may actually help those who need it most. Read more >


Exercise As a Treatment for Depression
Esther Entin, M.D.

Exercise is a valuable treatment for depression, especially for those who have trouble with antidepressants. Read more >


Pet Ownership Linked to Decreased Risk of Heart Disease
Charlotte LoBuono

Having a pet can be good for your heart, but that's not a good enough reason to get one. Read more >


Using the Threat of Higher Insurance Premiums to Encourage Exercise
Alice G. Walton

There’s one way to get people exercising: Threaten to charge them higher insurance premiums. Read more >


The Best Route to Improved Health: Change Diet and Exercise Habits Together
Charlotte LoBuono

Couch potatoes, here's the strategy you need. Read more >


Walking Just as Good for the Heart As Running
Alice G. Walton

Walking can be just as good as running for the heart. Read more >


Barefoot Running Shoes: Go Slowly
Neil Wagner

Minimalist or barefoot running shoes may be more natural, but switching to them is tricky. Stress fractures are not uncommon. Read more >


Take a Stand: Sitting Is Linked to Diabetes
Alice G. Walton

Spending less time sitting could reduce your diabetes risk as much as adding vigorous exercise to your day. Read more >


Exercise Improves Self Control, Decision-Making
Charlotte LoBuono

Exercise can help us exert more self control. It enhances the brain's ability to solve problems, plan, and make decisions. Read more >


Aerobic Fitness Raises Scores on Reading and Math Tests
Alice G. Walton

Fitness is more important to academic performance than most people realize. Read more >


Popular Misconceptions (and a Few Facts) about Obesity
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

A study in The New England Journal of Medicine shows we know less than we think we do about dieting. Read more >


The Link Between Lifestyle and Semen Quality
Charlotte LoBuono

Exercise is an important factor in male fertility. Men who watch TV 20 hours a week have sperm counts half those of men who watch less. Read more >


Eating Your Biggest Meal Earlier in the Day Can Boost Weight Loss
Alice G. Walton

People who eat their biggest meal earlier in the day are more successful at losing weight. Read more >


Obese and Overweight Children Face Serious Health Risks
Esther Entin, M.D.

You wouldn't let your child play near the street unsupervised; don't let him or her eat unsupervised either. Read more >


The School Day Needs More...Recess
Neil Wagner

In Japan, schoolchildren are given a 10-15 minute break every hour. Recess is important to cognitive, physical and social development. Read more >


Exercise Can Help Non-Athletes Live As Long As Olympians
Charlotte LoBuono

Olympians do seem to live longer, but their advantage is surprisingly easy for us mere mortals to equal. Read more >


Survey Says Dietitians Can Help Physicians Treat Obesity
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

What happens when physicians, nutritionists, dietitians, and other professionals work together to curb obesity? Progress. Read more >


Fructose on the Brain: How the Infamous Sugar Affects Appetite
Alice G. Walton

Fructose, the sugar in high fructose corn syrup, appears to leave the brain craving more food. Read more >


The Power of Social Media Could Help Fight Childhood Obesity
Charlotte LoBuono

Dieting is easier when you are part of a community. The Internet is a natural place for kids and teens interested in losing weight to gather. Read more >


Sedentary Nation: Too Little Walking, Too Much Sitting
Neil Wagner

Sitting too much and moving too little can shorten life. They are also easy to remedy. Read more >


Aerobic Exercise the Best Route to Weight, Fat Loss
Charlotte LoBuono

Aerobic exercise is superior to resistance training for losing weight and body fat. Read more >


Driving Just a Little Less Can Make a Big Difference
Leslie Carr

Hang up your car keys and walk just one mile a day. The savings — on gas and healthcare — are impressive. Read more >


Short Bursts of Physical Activity Can Boost Your Memory
Alice G. Walton

Short bursts of activity can help memory, for people with memory problems and those without. Read more >


Putting Shoes that Promise a Firmer Posterior to the Test
Neil Wagner

Does my butt look smaller? Can shoes make a difference? Read more >


Exercise Can Add Years to Your Life — Now We Know How Many
Alice G. Walton

The more active you are, the longer you will likely live. Read more >


Enlisting Exergames in the Fight Against Childhood Obesity
Esther Entin, M.D.

"Exergames," video games controlled by players' motion, offer a new way to raise children's activity levels. Read more >


Simple Ways to Increase Fitness Can Reduce the Risk of Falls
Alice G. Walton

By putting a little extra effort into regular movements, senirs can build enough strength and balance to reduce the risk of a fall. Read more >


Us or Them: Who's to Blame for Our Sugar Problem?
Alice G. Walton

In the "war" against obesity, it seems that the soda industry wants to shift the blame to consumers. Read more >


Better than a Diet and Easier, Too
Neil Wagner

Reducing TV time and increasing one's consumption of fruit and vegetables are two relatively painless ways to improve health. Read more >


Pedometers Increase Exercise
Esther Entin, M.D.

Using a pedometer can motivate seniors to walk farther and exercise longer. Read more >


Injections Could Help Reduce LDL ("Bad") Cholesterol
Alice G. Walton

A new antibody injection could lower your "bad" LDL cholesterol. Read more >


Losing Weight May Not Change Body Image
Alice G. Walton

Losing weight may not make body image issues disappear. Read more >


Stand Up and Fight for Your Life
Neil Wagner

Even active people have an increased risk of death if they sit too much. Read more >


Being Hungry Can Bias Your Senses
Alice G. Walton

When you're hungry, you respond to food-related cues more strongly than when you’re full. Reason not to shop on an empty stomach. Read more >


Cooler Hands Can Help Increase Exercise
Neil Wagner

Something as simple as carrying a cold bottle of water can help you exercise longer... Read more >


A Sign to Take the Stairs
Neil Wagner

Simple reminders can improve health behavior in important ways, whether it's washing one's hands more often or taking the stairs. Read more >


Massage Boosts the Recovery of Muscles After Exercise
Alice G. Walton

A ten-minute massage can help sore muscles heal after vigorous exercise. Read more >


Healthy Food Choices May Be as Simple as Green for Go
Alice G. Walton

Two simple changes help people make the smarter food choices. Now to get stores and cafeterias to... Read more >


Heart Risk Redefined: You May Not Be As Immune As You Think
Alice G. Walton

A new formula for figuring heart and stroke risk is sobering, but luckily many of the risk factors are largely within our control. Read more >


When Safe Playgrounds Become Boring, Kids' Health Suffers
Alice G. Walton

Out on the playground, there's a fine line between safe and boring. Read more >


The FDA Tackles Antibiotic Resistance, Targets Farm Animals
Alice G. Walton

The government plans to curb antibiotic use in food animals, hoping to reduce antibiotic-resistance. Read more >


Long Distance Running Is Hard on the Heart
Alice G. Walton

Long distance runners can develop temporary damage to the heart, but it doesn't mean you should quit. Read more >


Overeating Explained by Three Neurological Processes, Not Laziness
Alice G. Walton

Overeating involves neurological processes involving impulse control and reward, not laziness. Read more >


Family Meals Help Cut Childhood Obesity
Alice G. Walton

Just having kids cut their fat intake does not help them lose weight. So what does work? Read more >


Taste, Price Are Bigger Influences in Food Choice than Calories
Alice G. Walton

Taste and price drive food most people's food choices. Many don't even know how many calories... Read more >


FTC Urges Courts to Shut Down Fake Health Sites, Reimburse Consumers
Alice G. Walton

The FTC urges courts to crack down on fake news sites' phony claims about acai berry and weight loss Read more >


Fitness May Predict Heart Risk Better than Weight
Alice G. Walton

For people with heart trouble, their fitness level may be a better predictor of mortality than their weight. Read more >


Belly Fat May Not Predict Heart Disease As Once Believed
Alice G. Walton

Belly fat may not be as big a predictor of heart disease as once thought. Read more >


Olive Oil and Leafy Greens Help Women's Hearts
Alice G. Walton

Leafy greens and olive oil help protect women from heart disease. Read more >


Echinacea: Not All It's Cracked Up To Be, Say Researchers
Alice G. Walton

A small study finds this ancient herbal remedy doesn't cut the length or severity of a cold by much. Read more >


Can "Good" Cholesterol Help the Brain, Like the Heart, Stay Fit?
Alice G. Walton

In addition to helping your heart, higher levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol may reduce your risk of Alzheimer's disease. Read more >


Even A Little Smoke Poses "Immediate" Risk to the Body
Alice G. Walton

According to the Surgeon General, there is no safe level of cigarette smoke, even if it is secondhand. Read more >


Stress Not So Bad for the Belly
Alice G. Walton

Stress isn't behind as much weight gain as was previously thought, but there are sex differences... Read more >


Paying with Cash Curbs Junk Food Spending
Alice G. Walton

Research shows that if you pay with cash instead of credit, you'll be less likely to buy junk food Read more >


Why Aren't People Eating Whole-Grain Foods?
Neil Wagner

Afraid you won't like whole grains? Popcorn is a whole grain. And there are many ways to eat and prepare them. Experiment. Read more >


Sports Drinks: Soda in Disguise?
Neil Wagner

Don't let the term, "sports drink" fool you. Often these drinks have nearly as many calories as soda. Reach for water instead. Read more >


The Body Can Increase Number, Not Just Size, of Fat Cells
Alice G. Walton

In contrast to conventional beliefs, the body can actually grow new fat cells, rather than just enlarge those it already has. Read more >


Bringing Recess to the Workplace
Neil Wagner

Two quick exercise programs aim to get office workers moving, no matter what their fitness level. Read more >


Can Your Job Improve Your Lifestyle?
Alice G. Walton

Employers can help employees and their families get healthy with company programs and modest cash incentives. Read more >


Metabolic Syndrome Seriously Raises Heart Risk
Alice G. Walton

Metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance, high blood pressure, blood fats and sugar) doubles the risk for heart attack and stroke. Read more >


Modest Exercise Can Bring the Bones Big Benefits
Alice G. Walton

Just 20 minutes of exercise a day may help reduce fractures in women with bone loss. Read more >


Bad Habits Make Bad Employees, Study Finds
Alice G. Walton

People who smoke, overeat, or don't exercise take more sick days, while those who drink take fewer. Read more >


Worrying About Falling May Make It Happen - So Relax!
Alice G. Walton

Seniors who worry about falling actually fall more than those who don't. Read more >


Think It's OK to Gain a Few Pounds? Not for Blood Vessels, Researchers Say
Alice G. Walton

Losing just a few pounds, especially around your middle, may help your blood vessels work better. Read more >


Why Some Public Health Weight Loss Campaigns Fail
Alice G. Walton

Even well-meaning weight loss campaigns may end up turning off the people they are meant to inspire. Read more >


Sitting May Lead to Earlier Death
Alice G. Walton

Researchers find that the longer you sit, the shorter your lifespan. Read more >


Biggest Losers Do Better
Alice G. Walton

Slower may not always better when it comes to weight loss. Losing a fair amount of weight quickly tends to lead to better results. Read more >


New Weight Loss Drugs Seems Promising, But FDA Still to Rule
Alice G. Walton

Lorcaserin seems to help people slim down with fewer side-effects than past drugs. Will FDA approve? Read more >


The American Heart Association Reviews the Best Ways to Get Healthy, Stay Motivated
Alice G. Walton

Heart disease hits 1 in 3 people. The first step to heart health is to set realistic behavioral rather than physiological goals. Read more >


Ditch The Car and Hop on The Train If You Want to Shed Pounds
Alice G. Walton

Leaving the car at home and taking the train can help you be more active and lose some weight. Read more >


To Boost Your Self-Esteem and Mood, Exercise in the Green, Researchers Say
Alice G. Walton

If you are feeling a little down, head outdoors. Just five minutes outside boosts mood and self-esteem. Read more >


Heart Rate May Predict Heart-Related Death, Study Finds
Alice G. Walton

If your heart rate at rest is over 100 beats per minute, you are at far higher risk of death from heart disease. It is not too late to act. Read more >


Exercise: A Boost for Aging Brains and Bodies
Esther Entin, M.D.

A series of studies on exercise and aging shows that brisk walking can improve bones, heart and balance. Read more >


Exercise May Prevent – and Reverse – Age−Related Cognitive Decline
Alice G. Walton

Exercise helps prevent cognitive decline. Better circulation in the brain and increased brain cell production are two reasons why. Read more >


Running Shoe Design: Miles to Go
Neil Wagner

Walking in high heels increases knee torque by 20-26%. Read more >


Toning Down on TV Helps People Tone Up
Alice G. Walton

Simply turning off your TV can cut 120 calories a day, the equivalent of walking a mile. Read more >


Yoga Begins to Reveal Its Secrets
Neil Wagner

Yoga appears to help the body by reducing its inflammatory response to stress. Read more >


Watching TV May Shorten Your Life
Neil Wagner

Spending too much time sitting in front of the TV or computer, rather than moving, raises the risk of cardiovascular disease. Read more >


Over-Exercising Could Lead to Osteoarthritis
Alice G. Walton

By middle age we need to be careful about how much active exercise we do. Swimming and low-impact exercise is best. Read more >


If You Want to Eat Less, Work Out in the Heat
Alice G. Walton

Working out in warmer conditions (think non-AC rooms) reduces hunger, thanks to peptide YY, which signals fullness. Read more >


Vitamins C, E May Ward off Age-Related Muscle Loss
Alice G. Walton

A diet high in antioxidants, particularly vitamins E and C, may slow age-related muscle loss. Read more >


Can Exercise Make You Smarter?
Neil Wagner

Aerobic exercise in adolescence has been found to raise intelligence test scores and lead to better work. Read more >


A Little Exercise Goes a Long Way
Neil Wagner

When it comes to exercise, your body has a short memory. It wants to know what you've done for it lately. Read more >


Vigorous Daily Exercise May Cut Cancer Risk in Half
Alice G. Walton

Working out with moderate to high intensity for at least 30 minutes per day may cut your overall risk of cancer by half. Read more >


Being Fit — Mentally and Physically — Keeps Mind Sharp with Age
Alice G. Walton

Physical fitness and a high school education are two factors that appear to decrease the risk of mental decline. Read more >


Want to Exercise? Get a Dog
Neil Wagner

Dogs make good exercise companions -- and motivators. Read more >


Exercise as Mood Enhancer
Neil Wagner

People feel good after exercising and this feeling can last up to 12 hours. Read more >


Finding Fun Ways to Stay Fit
Jordana Bieze Foster

Think of play (dancing, hiking, tennis) when you think of fitness. It will help keep you motivated. Read more >


Flat Feet: Not the Achilles Heel for Young Athletes
Esther Entin, M.D.

Flat feet used to have the reputation of causing painful feet in adulthood as well as poor motor skills but research is finding differently. Read more >


Finally, a Simple Exercise Guideline
Neil Wagner

To get the kind of moderate exercise most of us need, walk at a rate of 100 steps a minute, for 150 minutes a week. Read more >


Beginning Exercise in Middle-Age Offers Same Benefits as Long-Term
Alice G. Walton

Beginning exercise -- even in mid-life -- can have a profound effect on your health. Read more >


Quad-Cartilage Connection: Strength May Protect Against Knee OA Progression
Jordana Bieze Foster

Strong quadriceps can keep knee cartilage from crumbling. Read more >


Exercise is Under-Utilized in Treating Back Pain
Neil Wagner

Exercise can help reduce back pain, but tends not to be prescribed often enough. Read more >


Exercise, Not Television-Watching, Reduces Type-2 Diabetes in African-American Women
Alice G. Walton

A quick way to greatly reduce your diabetes risk is to turn off the TV and go for a walk. Read more >


Happy Feet Keep Exercise Resolutions on Track
Jordana Bieze Foster

Have your feet measured before you buy athletic shoes. Exercising in tight shoes can cause a neuroma, or a pinched nerve. Read more >


Winning Warm-up: Soccer Injuries Nearly Halved
Jordana Bieze Foster

Warming up before exercise can greatly reduce the risk of injury. Read more >


Tai Chi: Good for the Knees?
Neil Wagner

Study says Tai Chi can help reduce the pain of arthritis. Read more >


Glucosamine And Chondroitin: A Joint Venture In Question
Jordana Bieze Foster

Glucosamine and chondroitin may not work as well together as we think. Read more >


Exercise: Every Little Bit Helps
Neil Wagner

When it comes to exercise, more may be better, but some is much better than none at all. Read more >


Why the Brainy May Pack on the Pounds
Alice G. Walton

Glucose and insulin levels fluctuate much more during mental work than during periods of relaxation. Read more >


Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis
John E. Morley, M.B., B.Ch. and Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D.



Asthma and College Athletes
Tom Gilbert

A significant number of athletes suffer from undiagnosed exercise-induced asthma. Read more >


How Sweet It Is: Sweeteners in Health and Disease
Edward Saltzman, M.D.



A Potent Argument for Exercise?
Tom Gilbert

Exercise helps reduce the risk of erectile dysfunction or ED. Read more >


Sports Injuries and the Aging Athlete
John E. Morley, M.D.

Not long ago, a man named Al Hanna successfully reached the southern summit of Mt. Read more >


Fibromyalgia: Real or Imaginary?
M. Nergis Alnigenis (Yanmaz), M.D., and Peter Barland, M.D.

A low-impact exercise program may help relieve the symptoms of Fibromyalgia Syndrome. Read more >


The Graying of Society: Nutrition, Vitamins and Aging
Robert M. Russell, M.D., and Joel B. Mason, M.D.

The elderly need to drink at least 8 servings of water or equivalent liquids every day. Read more >


How to Handle the Heat
Martin J. Carey, M.D.

Our skin is the radiator of the car. It is the place where most of our cooling occurs. Read more >


How Much Protein Do You Need?
Robert M. Russell, M.D., and Carmen Castanada Sceppa, M.D., Ph.D.

Amino acid supplements are not digested and absorbed into the body as readily as amino acidscoming directly from food sources. Read more >





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