December 18, 2014
   
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Marriage Problems Take Their Toll on the Heart
Elderly couples with marital problems are more likely to have cardiac problems as well. Counseling can help. Read more >


Speaking a Second Language May Keep the Brain in Good Shape
Speaking more than one language is one of the most powerful ways to keep your mind sharp. Read more >


The Green Way to Get to Work
A network of bicycle and pedestrian paths in Minneapolis is making a big difference in the number of active commuters. Read more >


The Science of Choking Under Pressure
Performing our best under pressure is not easy, and people have different reasons for choking. Read more >


Scratching Really Does Make Itches Worse
The urge to scratch an itch is irresistible, but it really does make the itch worse. See why. Read more >


Of All the Emotions, Sadness Lasts the Longest
Of all the emotions, one lasts the longest. Here's why. Read more >


Cholesterol Levels Reflect Number of Meals Eaten Away from Home
The number of meals you eat away from home has a big effect on body mass and cholesterol levels. Read more >


Researchers Find An Ingenious Way to Measure Seniors' Drinking
Ask someone how much they drink, and the answer they'll give you may not jibe with the number of bottles in the trash. Read more >


Workplace Bullies
Over a third of U.S. workers report being bullied at work. Co-workers can help and still avoid repercussions. Read more >


Experts Agree: Violent Gaming is Linked to Aggression in Kids
The exact relationship between violent video games and violence and aggression among children isn't clear, but the fact they are linked is. Read more >


How to Lose Friends and Alienate People
Talking about that chance meeting with George Clooney or your trip to Machu Picchu may not be the social lubricant you hope. Read more >


Multitasking Linked to Changes in the Brain
Multitasking may result in a loss of density in gray matter in a key brain area. Read more >


Curiosity Primes the Brain to Learn
Curiosity literally makes the brain more open to learning. We may be able to use this finding in schools. Read more >


Immature Connections Among Brain Networks May Be Behind ADHD
The connections among brain networks in people with ADHD are immature. Can they be helped to develop normally? Read more >


Networking: Dirty Work or Community-Building?
Self-promotion can leave people feeling dirty. Literally. But it doesn’t have to. Read more >


Changing A Memory’s Emotional Color and Maybe Its Impact
Events connected to strong emotions are colored by those feelings. Scientists are figuring out how to disconnect the two. Read more >


Biochemical Keys to Stress and Resilience Are Uncovered
Some people seem resistant to stress, while others are susceptible to it. Researchers are starting to understand why. Read more >


Good Neighbors — and Neighborhoods — Make Good Health
Good relationships with your neighbors and a feeling that you belong to a community are good for heart health. Read more >


Pruning the Hedges of Autism
“Neural pruning” helps kids' brains become more efficient. This happens less among children with ASD. Here's why. Read more >


Severe Depression Helped by A Combo of Antidepressants and Talk Therapy
Antidepressants and talk therapy together may be the key to overcoming severe depression. Read more >


Active Commuting Offers Health — and Environmental — Benefits
Commuters who drive themselves to work weigh five to seven pounds more than those who walk or bike. Read more >


Nature Really Does Nurture
Mothers who spend more time in green spaces are less likely to have low birth weight babies. Read more >


Finding Narcissists is Easy
Figuring out who is a narcissist is pretty easy. All you have to do is ask. Read more >


Good News at the Wrong Time Isn’t Good News at All
The timing of good news is almost as important as the news itself. Read more >


Early Lead Exposure in Children Linked to Depression and Anxiety
In addition to harming brain development, lead exposure is also linked to emotional problems like depression and anxiety. Read more >


Ginkgo Promotes Repair Following Stroke
The herb ginkgo biloba helped mice generate new neurons after a stroke. Can it do the same for people? Read more >


Smoking Increases the Risk of Suicide
Smoking doesn't just harm your heart and lungs. It can bring on serious depression, and make suicide more likely. Read more >


Mixing Energy Drinks and Alcohol Can Make You Drink More
When people mix energy drinks with alcohol, they tend to drink more. Read more >


Brain Patterns Predict Stock Market Bubbles
What is it that inspires some investors to leave the market before a crash? They use a different part of their brains than the rest of us. Read more >


The Art of Cheering Up Friends
The best way to cheer someone up may depend on how robust or fragile their self esteem is. Read more >


Synchronized Brain Waves Make Rapid Learning Possible
How are we able to shift from thinking about what's for dinner to what's happening in Iraq? It starts with humming in two brain areas. Read more >


Children from Divorced Homes May Be at Risk for Weight Problems
Children of divorce are more likely to be overweight or obese. Especially boys. Read more >


ADHD Stimulant Treatment May Help Prevent Smoking
People with ADHD are often smokers and face serious health problems. Stimulant drugs for the disorder may reduce this risk. Read more >


Children Prefer Being Helpers to Helping
If you want your children to clean up, try enlisting them as helpers, rather than asking them to help. It makes a difference. Read more >


Marriage More Likely to End in Divorce If Wife Becomes Ill
When a married woman becomes ill, divorce may loom on the horizon. But the same is not true for men. Read more >


Hearing Loss More Common Among Musicians than Expected
Hearing loss is an occupational hazard among musicians. Read more >


Depressed Brains Boosted to a More Resilient State
Mice prone to depression became resistant to stress and depression after a jump-start. Read more >


Physicians Take on Gun Violence
Because of their special understanding of family issues, doctors can play a big role when it comes to preventing gun violence, according to a new ACP policy statement. Read more >


Marijuana's Bad Effects on the Brain
Marijuana may ease the pain and nausea associated with chemotherapy, but it also leaves certain brain areas abnormally enlarged. Read more >


Active Moms Raise Active Kids
Parents' own activity levels have a big effect on how active — and healthy — their children will be. Read more >


Stress Makes Allergies Worse
Stress appears to make allergies worse. Calming the mind can help. Read more >


Cholesterol Screening Offers Benefits for At-Risk Children
Almost a third of children 11 and under had problems with their cholesterol levels. Luckily, such early information means they can be improved. Read more >


Violent Video Games and Aggression
Playing violent video games makes kids prone to seeing others as hostile and acting aggressively. Read more >


Often Under the Radar, Binge Drinking May Lead to an Early Death
Drinking five drinks twice a week is far worse for your health than drinking two drinks five times a week, even though they may seem equal. Read more >


Scientists Begin to Understand Why Autism Is More Common in Boys Than Girls
Now we know why boys are more genetically susceptible to autism. Read more >


In Relationships, A Good Foundation Matters More than Communication
Conflict happens, and can even make relationships stronger. But you need one ingredient. Read more >


A New Brain Region Is Implicated in Anxiety
When we are anxious a brain region long-believed to calm responsiveness actually seems to excite it. Read more >


Neurofeedback: High Tech Mind Control
What if epileptics could learn to prevent their own seizures using neurofeedback? MEG scans may make it possible. Read more >


A Possible Biological Basis for Religiosity
People who are religious have thicker cortices than those who aren't. So which causes what? Read more >


Late Night Smartphone Use Interferes with Productivity
People who use their smartphones late at night are less productive the next day. Read more >


Fewer Psychiatrists Accept Health Insurance
Obamacare promotes greater access to mental health services but few psychiatrists accept insurance. Read more >


Dementia, Alzheimer's, on the Decline
The rates of dementia and Alzheimer's disease are declining. Read more >


Brain and Behavioral Effects Seen in Offspring of Absentee Fathers
An involved father offers kids an edge in terms of the brain developments key to social behavior Read more >


Cell Phone Angst
We all love our cell phones, but they can increase anxiety and make us miserable. Read more >


Media Coverage of Traumatic Events and Acute Stress
It's OK to be informed, but binge-watching the news when disaster strikes can cause traumatic stress. Read more >


Men and Women's Neural Networks Reflect Sex Differences
A new kind of brain scan tells us a lot about why women are better at meetings and men at maps. Read more >


Sacrosine Shows Promise As a New Way to Relieve Depression
Sarcosine, found in muscles and other body tissues, improved mood better than a popular antidepressant. Read more >


Decision-Making Linked to Motivation, Depression
Decisions, motivation and depression all seem to reside in the same areas of the brain. Read more >


Psychobiotics, A Possible New Treatment for Depression
We know probiotics are good for GI heath. They may also affect mental health. Read more >


Gun Violence in PG-13 Movies Can Exceed That in R-rated Films
Beware the gun effect. PG-13 films are more violent than those rated R. Read more >


Making Social Networks Work for Vulnerable Teens
The Internet offers troubled kids support and community. It also raises the risk of suicide. Read more >


Cell Phones at Meetings: Rules of Engagement for the New Civil War
Cell phones make the business world go round, but they also derail many meetings -- and careers. Read more >


Brief School Counseling Program Helps Teens Cope
Offering teens a couple sessions of therapy can go a long way to nipping mental health problems in the bud. Read more >


Social Media Like Twitter, Facebook Can Help Smokers Quit
Social media sites can offer people trying to quit smoking the community and support they need to succeed. Read more >


Skype Me! Social Interaction Feeds Language Development
The back-and-forth of social interaction -- gestures, eye contact and reactions -- are very important to learning language. Read more >


Alcohol Changes Awareness of Drunk Driving
People need to decide before they drink that they won't drive. It's too late after they've had a few. Read more >


New Way to Study Movement Could Yield Autism Treatments
New technology may make it possible for ASD kids to guide their own treatments. Read more >


Oxytocin and The Pleasure We Get from Being Social
The hormone oxytocin helps stimulate human connection. It also appears important to experiencing ple Read more >


3-D Video Game Improves Cognitive Control
A video game that works key brain circuits helps bring aging brains' performance up to speed. Read more >


Lead Exposure Linked to School Suspension
Children exposed to lead are almost four times more likely to be suspended from school. Read more >


Driving to Work Raises Diabetes Risk
Those who drive to work have a far higher risk of diabetes than those who walk or bike. Even a bus is better. Read more >


Scientists Succeed in Creating a False Memory
It's not quite "Inception," but scientists have invaded the brains of mice and made fake memories. Read more >


Weather Changes are Linked to Violence
Tempers rise with temperature, and globally, this is not good news. Read more >


When It Comes to Resolving Conflicts in Relationships, One Size Does Not Fit All
When couples fight, issues of disrespect or neglect may underlie the conflict. Read more >


Brain Development Appears Influenced by Regular Bedtimes
Regular bedtimes for kids are important for brain development. Read more >


Childhood Iron Deficiency's Long-Term Effects
Babies with low iron run the risk of a range difficulties that persist into adulthood. Read more >


For Millenials, Global Downturn May Have A Silver Lining
If you survey high school seniors, the global downturn has had some positive, as well as negative, effects. Read more >


Hand Gestures Help Kids Pick Up Language
The more we “talk” with our hands – using gestures to express meaning – the easier it is for children to understand and pick up new words. Read more >


How You Think About Stress Can Affect Your Heart
Not everyone feels their health is threatened by stress, but if you do, it's bad news for your heart Read more >


Accidents on the Rise for Pedestrians on Cell Phones
A pedestrian walks into a lamppost. Drivers distracted by cell phones aren't the only ones in the ER Read more >


Sensory Enhancement Helps Autistic Children Connect
Lemons and bubblewrap. Kids with autism improved with sensory focused therapy. Read more >


iPods in the ICU
Listening to music — or noise-canceling headphones — can ease patients' anxiety. Read more >


The Power of Good Habits
We all fall back on our habits; the trick is to make them healthy. Read more >


Biases May Prompt Overweight Patients to Switch Doctors
Some doctors have conscious and unconscious biases against patients who are overweight. Read more >


Talk Therapy Helps Depression
Many types of talk therapy work for depression; the important thing is to get started on one. Read more >


Study Finds Probiotics in Yogurt Affect Brain
You really are what you eat. The probiotics in yogurt actually change the chemistry of your brain. Read more >


Men and Women Look for Different Benefits from Relationships
Men and women value relationships for different reasons. Women value companionship; can you guess what men value? Read more >


Our Fear of Missing Out
The fear of missing out — we all suffer from it at times, but social media is making it worse. Read more >


Affirming Our Priorities Helps Offset the Mental Effects of Stress
Self-affirmations can help you through periods of chronic stress. Read more >


Deep Relaxation Brings Immediate Genetic Changes
Meditation, yoga, and other practices that bring deep relaxation can actually alter your genes. Read more >


Kids with Autism Focus on the Essentials
Kids with ASD copy the actions of others differently. This tells us a bit more about how they see things. Read more >


Making Sure Heart Patients Get Treated for Depression
Depression is common after a heart attack. Treating it not only works, it saves lives and cuts costs. Read more >


Public Pre-K Exceeds Its Goals
Pre-K programs can help kids with school readiness and bring unexpected side benefits that last a lifetime. Read more >


CDC Study Examines Autism-Vaccine Link
Vaccines have not been shown to cause autistic spectrum disorders. Read more >


Why Overheard Cell Phone Conversations Are So Annoying
Why that guy on the cell phone at the table next to you is so annoying. Read more >


Teens' Relationship Problems Predict Their Struggles as Adults
When parents help teens navigate peer social relationships, they improve kids' adult relationships down the road. Read more >


Exercise Improves Self Control, Decision-Making
Exercise can help us exert more self control. It enhances the brain's ability to solve problems, plan, and make decisions. Read more >


Lasting Brain Damage from Even A Single Concussion
Even a single concussion can result in reduced brain volume and impaired emotional and executive functioning. Take time to recover. Read more >


It's Healthier To Give than To Receive
Helping others isn't just a good thing to do. It's one of the best de-stressors there is. Read more >


It's Not How Close You Feel, It's How Close You Want to Be
Not everyone desires the same level of intimacy. What matters is whether you and your partner have the same need. Read more >


Bullying Leaves Long-Lasting Psychological Effects
The effects of bullying can be long-lasting, especially for those who have been both bully and victim. Read more >


Parkinson's Treatment Can Unlock Creativity
The medications Parkinson's patients take can cause a wonderful side effect — a flowering of creativity. Read more >


Diet Drink Mixers Raise Alcohol Levels
Mixing diet drinks with alcohol has a bigger effect on blood alcohol than using mixers or soda with sugar or no mixer at all. Read more >


Eating Your Biggest Meal Earlier in the Day Can Boost Weight Loss
People who eat their biggest meal earlier in the day are more successful at losing weight. Read more >


The Myth of Multitasking
To the guy checking his mail as he talks on the phone: you aren't efficient; you're distracted. Read more >


Yoga May Help Mental Health Disorders, from Depression to Schizophrenia
Yoga can help ease certain mental health disorders. Read more >


Speaking Two or More Languages May Slow Cognitive Decline
Attention! Atención! Achtung! More evidence that the mental challenges of our youth have long-term benefits. Read more >


Are Women More Comfortable In Their Skin than Men?
Are the near-naked female avatars in games a sign of liberation? Read more >


Flavor Comes in Many Colors
Cocoa served in cups of a certain color tastes better. Read more >


The School Day Needs More...Recess
In Japan, schoolchildren are given a 10-15 minute break every hour. Recess is important to cognitive, physical and social development. Read more >


Surprise! You Won't Be Who You Think You Are
As we age, we tend to think we are pretty much done changing. But the truth is there is more to come. Read more >


Why Did the Distracted Pedestrians Cross the Road?
It's really not possible to cross a busy intersection safely while multitasking. You need to pay attention. Read more >


Kindness Is a Key to Kids' Happiness and Popularity
When kids are encouraged to be kinder, they also end up being happier and more popular. Read more >


The Power of Social Media Could Help Fight Childhood Obesity
Dieting is easier when you are part of a community. The Internet is a natural place for kids and teens interested in losing weight to gather. Read more >


Better Language Skills Help Kids Cope with Emotions
Helping kids with language development gives them the tools to express their emotions, rather than act out. Read more >


Study Skills and Motivation More Important to Math Than Smarts
Math is not all about smarts. Motivation and going beyond rote memorization are more important. Read more >


How Old is Too Old for Santa?
Concerned about telling your children about Santa? A psychologist says, back off. Read more >


Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Antidepressant-Resistant Depression
Antidepressants don't help everyone. A new study finds that one kind of psychotherapy can improve the odds. Read more >


Treating ADHD with Medication Reduces a Person's Risk of Criminal Behavior
Crime and medication? People with ADHD are less likely to commit crimes if they take medication. Read more >


How Our Brain Gets Us Motivated
Tracking the brain circuits involved in motivation and depression. Read more >


A Spray to Keep Your Man from Straying
A spritz of "love" hormone kept men's eyes from wandering. Is this a new form of chemical warfare or a set-up for a sitcom? Read more >


Meditation: Changing the Mind for the Better
Meditation changes the brain differently, depending on the type of meditation you practice. Read more >


Kids' Generosity Needs Monitors
Is our “ungenerosity” innate? Read more >


Clear Expectations Mean Better Student Behavior
Bullying and disruptive behavior are big problems in schools. So why not teach kids how to behave? Read more >


Puzzle Interviews Unpopular with Job Applicants
As if looking for work wasn't hard enough: now interviews feature "trick" questions designed to... Read more >


Learning to Identify Negative Emotions May Be Important in Battling Depression
Learning to identify your emotions may help with depression. It's not as easy as it sounds. Read more >


Progress on Two Fronts in Our Understanding of Autism
Researchers may have found a treatment for one form of autism. Read more >


An Experimental Drug May Address the Cognitive Problems of PTSD
Post-traumatic stress disorder is more than anxiety. A new drug may help the cognitive problems... Read more >


A Gene May Help Explain Happiness in Women, Not Men
A gene previously dubbed the "warrior gene" because of its links to aggression may also be linked... Read more >


Going Online Can Help You Lose Weight, But Does It Beat Face-to-Face?
Going online to lose weight or to maintain it can be a big help. Read more >


The Things We Forget to Do: How to Remember Them
Forgetting to do what we intend to do is common. There are ways, however, to remember the milk... Read more >


Study of Rituals Provides Insight Into Human Logic and Reasoning
Rituals tend to provide a level of comfort, a sense of control. They also tell us a bit about... Read more >


Researchers Discover A Massive "Plumbing" Network in the Brain
We thought we knew how the brain cleans itself out. Then a completely unexpected... Read more >


Lying Eyes: Just a Myth?
A widely accepted method for telling if someone is telling the truth just went out the window... Read more >


Dental Filling Material Linked to Behavioral Problems in Children
Fillings with a form of the chemical BPA raise the likelihood that a child will have emotional... Read more >


The Power of Good Deeds
When faced with uncertainty, we are more likely to believe in the power of good deeds.... Read more >


Could Some Dementias Be Autoimmune Diseases?
One form of dementia may be the result of the immune system going haywire. Luckily, there might be.. Read more >


Could Where You Live Be Making You Fat?
Where you live and the roads on which you drive have a big impact on the likelihood you will become obese. Read more >


Long-Term Contraception More Effective at Preventing Unintended Pregnancies
Women taking the pill or patch or ring were far more likely to have an unplanned pregnancy... Read more >


To Find the Most Skilled, Don't Look at the Top
Those who aspire to the success of Bill Gates or Mark Zuckerberg might consider role models... Read more >


A Brain Chemical That Makes Bad Memories Disappear
Researchers discover why anxiety can persist for months or years after a stressful event. It's all about a brain chemical. Read more >


Texting Raises Truthfulness, Accuracy
People tend to be more thoughtful, honest, and accurate when texting than over the phone... Read more >


Experience Taking: How Good Books Can Change You
Reading a book can actually change who you are, teaching you about yourself as you live through... Read more >


Shifting When You Eat Could Shift Your Metabolism
Curbing the hours of the day during which you eat could have a big impact on your weight and health. Read more >


What Your Facebook Photo Really Says about You
What does your Facebook photo say about you? A recent study suggests it is a cultural indicator... Read more >


Oxytocin May Hold Even More Promise for Treating Symptoms of Autism
Oxytocin, the mother-infant bonding hormone, activates the "social" areas of the brain.... Read more >


Computer Time Could Prevent Cognitive Decline (But Don't Forget to Exercise)
Computer time along with physical activity may prevent cognitive decline. Read more >


A Three-Hour Therapy Session Could Treat Arachnophobia
People so afraid of spiders that they wouldn't walk on grass were cured of their phobia with... Read more >


Traumatic Brain Injuries May Be Rising for Young Football Players
Fatal brain injuries in high school football players rose last year. Read more >


The Biology of Kindness and Well Being
Everyday experiences change the brain. Researchers consider the effects of well being and kindness.. Read more >


Being Aware of Your Own Mortality Can Make for a Better Life
Being aware of our mortality can actually help us live richer, fuller lives. Read more >


Puttering About Could Reduce Your Risk for Alzheimer's Disease
The simplest activities, even housework, can reduce your risk for cognitive decline. Read more >


A Snapshot of Stress Across the Generations
The Millennial generation is more stressed than generations before. They are also less able to cope. Read more >


Losing Weight May Not Change Body Image
Losing weight may not make body image issues disappear. Read more >


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and the Brain
Certain brain centers are less active in chronic fatigue syndrome patients, suggesting a new... Read more >


Ladies, There's No Turning Back the Biological Clock
Delaying motherhood may mean forgoing motherhood. But there are options if you think ahead. Read more >


Looking through the Eyes Helps Doctors See into the Brain
Measuring degeneration of the eye could tell us if it is also occurring in the brain. Read more >


Who Will Divorce?
Even the happiest newlyweds can go on to divorce. But early warning signs might predict who does... Read more >


Being Hungry Can Bias Your Senses
When you're hungry, you respond to food-related cues more strongly than when you’re full. Reason not to shop on an empty stomach. Read more >


Failing Has Its Benefits For Kids
Teaching kids that failing is a part of learning can give them the confidence to do well. Read more >


Hiding Veggies in Other Foods May Not Be the Best Way to Get Kids to Eat Healthy
Hiding vegetables in children's food can backfire. Read more >


Brain Cells Benefit from the Company of Others
Brain connections that form when we learn something new are strengthened when there are friends near Read more >


Parent Training Could Help Manage the Difficult Behaviors of Autism
Training parents helps them help their children behave better.... Read more >


More Insight into How the Mediterranean Diet Benefits Body and Mind
People who follow the Mediterranean diet do better mentally as they age. Now we know why... Read more >


Endorphins May Explain Why Alcohol Makes Us Feel Happy
Alcohol works by releasing "feel good" chemicals, endorphins, in the brain, which could explain its addictiveness. Read more >


One in Five Americans Suffers from Mental Health Problems
One in five Americans suffers from mental health problems. There is no reason to feel uncomfortable about seeking help. Read more >


At The Intersection of Grief and Depression, A Controversy
A top medical journal questions whether the move to classify grief as depression has merit. Read more >


Physical Punishment Takes A Toll on Kids' Mental Health
Physical punishment does more harm than good to a child and encourages aggressive behavior. Other methods are more effective. Read more >


The Internet as Matchmaker
Internet dating is one of the top methods for finding love, whether the pros outweigh the cons... Read more >


More Education Improves IQ
An extra year or two of education can raise IQ significantly, even if the students are already teens Read more >


Gossip Can Be Good
Some kinds of gossip may actually benefit your health. Read more >


Oxytocin Could Help Introverts Feel More Outgoing
The mother-baby bonding hormone, oxytocin, made introverts feel more outgoing and trusting. Read more >


The Connection Between Good Nutrition and Good Cognition Becomes Clearer
Good nutrition and brain health go hand in hand; changing your diet can help protect your brain. Read more >


Adrenal Hormone DHEA For Menopause Symptoms
The hormone DHEA sounds like a miracle: it may ease menopause symptoms and boost sexual interest. Read more >


Understanding the Roots of Social Prejudice Could Help Us Counteract It
A new look at prejudice finds it may mostly exist just because we're afraid of germs. Read more >


Important Link in the Stress Response Could Mean Better Treatment
Researchers discover an important step in the stress response, which, if blocked, could stop... Read more >


A Better Way to Reduce Prejudice
When people are told to be less prejudiced, they are often more so. There's a better way. Read more >


New Research Broadens Our Understanding of Alzheimer's
A new study uncovers a major surprise in the Alzheimer's puzzle. Read more >


The "Rich Clubs" Make up an Elite Network in the Brain
"Rich Club" clusters of highly influential regions of brain cells do serious collaboration. Read more >


Carbonated Soda Consumption Raises Risk of Teen Violence
Heavy soft drink consumption (5+ cans a week) has been linked to an increased risk of violent behavior and alcohol consumption. Read more >


The Brain Can Form New Connections between Cells into Young Adulthood
Contrary to popular belief, the brain can form new connections into adulthood... Read more >


Embarrassment is Linked to Dependability, Generosity
People who become embarrassed more readily are also more dependable and generous. Read more >


New Insights into Alcohol and Brain Damage
Alcohol abuse damages precisely those areas of the brain that are also important to impulse control, making it harder to stop. Read more >


Can Parents Complete with Clever Marketing to Kids?
It's hard to compete with clever marketing, but you can help your kids make better food choices with consistent encouragement. Read more >


Researchers Show that "Paying Attention" May Distort Reality
The mind is notorious for playing tricks, but researchers discover paying attention can mislead us.. Read more >


Everybody Thinks They're Typical
What does a typical American or European or African look like? It depends on whom you ask... Read more >


Breastfeeding May Help Brain Development
Infants, particularly preemies, who were breastfed scored higher on reasoning and language tests at age 5. Read more >


Impulsive Children Become Impulsive Adults
The brains of impulsive people are different from those who can delay gratification. Read more >


Stimulating Environments Helps Give White Fat the Calorie-Burning Power of Brown Fat
In mice, living in a more stimulating envronment was linked to more calorie-burning brown fat. Is the same true for humans? Read more >


How We React to Stress Influences Performance
How you interpret your stress can influence how you perform on tests. Read more >


Fuzzy Logic: How Healthy Behavior Can Encourage Health Risks
Too often people believe that taking vitamins will protect you from the damage from bad habits like smoking. This is not true. Read more >


A Nagging Problem
Kids' nagging can wear down moms' resistance. But a study found some winning strategies... Read more >


Risk-Taking Behavior: It's Complicated
Teens are surprisingly risk-aversive in some situations, while women are apt to take more risks... Read more >


Overeating Explained by Three Neurological Processes, Not Laziness
Overeating involves neurological processes involving impulse control and reward, not laziness. Read more >


Learning to Be Positive May Help Beat Depression
Positive activity intervention (PAI) such as writing letters of gratitude or performing acts of kindness, may help mild depression. Read more >


Speech Processing May Be at the Heart of Dyslexia
The root of dyslexia may be in speech processing, a surprise to researchers... Read more >


Training in Positive Thinking Helps Teens Interpret Life in Healthier Ways
A simple computer program seems to help teens avoid negative thinking, which may help with anxiety.. Read more >


"Late Talkers" Turn Out Just Fine
Children with language delays have no more behavioral or emotional problems as adolescents than other kids. Read more >


Bad Habits Can Ruin Your Sex Life
People with drug or other substance dependence problems and those who are obese are less likely to have satisfying sex. Read more >


The Latest Cell Phone - Cancer Study Finds No Link
A new review study finds no good evidence of a cell phone-brain tumor connection... Read more >


Scientists Gain Clues into How Imagination Affects Actions
New research shows how our ability to imagine affects our reactions and our ability to plan... Read more >


Buying Flashy Cars Does Not Marriage Material Make
Men who engage in “conspicuous spending” (think Porsches) have one thing on their minds... Read more >


Stressful Events Lead to Unexpected Reaction in Panic Patients
You might think people with panic disorder would fall apart in a crisis, but that's not the case... Read more >


Kids' Brains Change as They Learn New Math Skills
Children's brains change as they learn math skills. Adults' too, hopefully. Read more >


The Roots of Body Dysmorphic Disorder
People with body dysmorphic disorder have problems in the brain's visual processing system. Read more >


The Color Red Boosts Speed and Intensity of Performance
Looking at the color red actually boosts the strength and speed of our physical reactions. Read more >


Violence in Cartoons Does Not Make Them More Enjoyable
Contrary to popular belief, kids do not enjoy violent cartoons any more than nonviolent ones... Read more >


The Agony of Ecstasy: Permanent Brain Changes
The club drug Ecstasy produces changes in brain chemistry. But these may not be the type of changes. Read more >


Cooperation and Guilt Linked in the Brain
Do we cooperate with others to experience positive feelings or avoid the bad ones? Read more >


Pesticide Exposure May Affect Kids' Cognitive Function
A banned residential pesticide is linked to lower IQ in kids. Read more >


When Neurons Nap, Mistakes are Made
In sleep-deprived rats random brain cells take "naps" while the animal is awake... Read more >


Alcoholism May Be Linked to Impulsivity Gene, Brain Differences
People with alcoholism in the family tend to have a genetic variation affecting impulsivity. Environmental factors also play a role. Read more >


Food May Activate Same Addiction Centers in the Brain as Drugs
Food addiction and drug addiction may activate the same reward areas of the brain. Read more >


FDA Panel Votes to Reject Warning Labels on Artificially Colored Foods: Good Move?
Some studies show a link between artificial dyes and ADHD. So why did the FDA reject warning labels? Read more >


Physical and Emotional Pain Have Similar Effect on the Brain
The emotional pain of romantic relationship break-up has the same effect on the brain as physical... Read more >


Omega-3 Supplements May Ease PMS
Omega-3 fatty acids supplements may help ease symptoms in women who suffer from PMS. Read more >


Many People Rate Themselves as Normal Even When Overweight: What's Changed?
People who are seriously overweight tend not to see themselves as being as heavy as they are... Read more >


Brain Areas Take On New Functions
Brain scans show how the visual cortex of blind people is recruited by the brain to help process... Read more >


The Larger the Society, the More Outstanding Its Members
A study has found that the larger the society, the more distinctive its members tend to become. Read more >


Cancer Patients on Opioid Drugs Have More Cognitive Deficits
Cancer patients on opioid painkillers often experience confusion, disorientation and forgetfulness. Read more >


"Talk Therapy" May Rewire the Brain
Anxious? Cognitive behavior therapy can help. The changes it brings can be seen in the brain itself. Read more >


Exercise May Be Best Bet for IBS Sufferers
Exercise significantly reduces the severity of IBS symptoms. Read more >


Helping Overweight Children by Teaching Parents
Educating parents about healthy lifestyles and nutrition is a very good way to reduce childhood obesity. Read more >


Pencils Better Than Pixels When It Comes to Learning
Writing by hand promotes learning far more than pressing a key. So what are we to do? Read more >


Meditation Changes the Cells of the Brain
Meditation changes the brain, with areas related to learning and memory expanding and areas related to anxiety, contracting. Read more >


Long-Term Cell Phone Use May Increase Risk of Brain Tumors
A large-scale analysis of cell phone use finds a connection between usage and brain cancer... Read more >


New Research Shows Us Why We Should Listen to the Heart
Do people listen to their bodies have better instincts when it comes to making intuitive decisions? Read more >


New ESP Study Has Scientific Community Up In Arms
New study reports evidence of ESP and stirs debate. Critics say we need reevaluate before believing. Read more >


Fibromyalgia: Too Tough for Mindfulness Therapy?
Can mindfulness therapy reduce the pain experienced by people with this baffling condition? Read more >


Mediterranean Diet May Keep the Brain Young
Eating a Mediterranean-style diet significantly slows cognitive decline in seniors. Read more >


Research Pinpoints Brain Site of Fear Response
The amygdala, a tiny almond-shaped structure in the brain, appears to strongly influence our fear response. Read more >


Making Changes: Resolutions You Can Stick To
There is an art to making resolutions you can actually keep and use to make changes in your life. Read more >


New Drinks for the New Year
Think before you drink. Not only is alcohol a risk factor for cancer and injury, it contains quite a few empty calories. Read more >


Can "Good" Cholesterol Help the Brain, Like the Heart, Stay Fit?
In addition to helping your heart, higher levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol may reduce your risk of Alzheimer's disease. Read more >


The Mind Works Better When It's Happy
We tend to think more creatively and flexibly when we are happy. Read more >


Scientists Make Big Strides in Understanding the Cause of Alzheimer's
It is not that Alzheimer's brains overproduce dangerous plaques; they have trouble getting rid of... Read more >


Everyone Needs Their Beauty Sleep
It's no surprise: people who get enough rest are rated as looking better than those who don't. Read more >


Can Sleep Deprivation Prevent Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder?
Scientists have found a way to disrupt upsetting memories of traumatic events: sleep deprivation. Read more >


Nice Guys Don't Finish Last; They Get Married
Marriage appears to make men nicer, though it's also true nice men are more likely to marry. Read more >


Antidepressant Use Climbs as Talk Therapy Rates Drop - But Is Mindfulness the Key?
More people are seeking treatment for depression. But the type of treatment they choose may not be.. Read more >


Retirement Reverses Job-Related Fatigue, Depression
Workers with exhaustion and depression felt significantly better after they retired... Read more >


Is a Wandering Mind an Unhappy Mind?
What are you thinking of right now? Was your mind wandering? Happier people tend to have minds focused on the present moment. Read more >


When One Half of the Brain Is Damaged, the Other Half Compensates
When part of the brain is damaged, it often gets an assist from undamaged areas to pick up the slack Read more >


Study Predicts Obesity Rates Will Continue to Rise
Having obese friends raises your chances of becoming obese considerably. Read more >


Stress Not So Bad for the Belly
Stress isn't behind as much weight gain as was previously thought, but there are sex differences... Read more >


Parkinson's May Be Linked to Energy Genes
Parkinson's disease appears linked to problems in the brain's energy stores... Read more >


Scented Products Give Off Toxic Chemicals
Many of those scented products you love actually give off toxic chemicals. Some are even "green." Read more >


Age Like a Fine Wine
Aging well has been linked to three factors: faith in your ability to exert control over your life, social support and exercise. Read more >


More Teens Are Reporting Hearing Loss
Teens' hearing has gotten worse. It may be from having the iPod or MP3 up too loud. Read more >


Close Friends "Light Up" The Brain
Close friends activate "social" areas of your brain more than strangers do. Read more >


Literate Mothers Boost Children's Test Scores
For young children in poor communities, having a mom who reads is a huge boost to school success. Read more >


Evidence that Violent Media Desensitizes Teenage Boys
Boys used to violent video clips have less response to them. Does this increase the likelihood... Read more >


Dogs Can Ease the Stress of Autism
Having a service dog reduces undesirable behavior and eases kids' (and parents') stress. Read more >


Vitamin B12 Linked to Reduced Risk of Alzheimer's Disease
Higher B12 levels are linked to reduced risk of cognitive decline, including Alzheimer's disease. Read more >


Is Morning Sickness a Good Thing?
Women who experience morning sickness are less likely to miscarry than women who do not... Read more >


A Hard-Knock Life May Do You Good Down the Road
Facing some adversity in your life may help you better cope with stress and be happier later on. Read more >


Why Aren't People Eating Whole-Grain Foods?
Afraid you won't like whole grains? Popcorn is a whole grain. And there are many ways to eat and prepare them. Experiment. Read more >


Alcohol and Violence: An Earlier Last Call May Help
An earlier last call at bars can lower the number of assaults and other alcohol-related violence. Read more >


Been There, Done That, Didn't Happen
"Observation inflation" occurs when we think we've done something we haven't. Read more >


Texting to Death
It has been estimated that for every 1 million new cell phone subscribers, deaths due to distracted driving rise by 19%. Read more >


Loneliness Comes from Within
Loneliness is not so much a condition as a reflection of how we see ourselves and others. Read more >


Youngest Children in Their Class Most Likely to Be Diagnosed with ADHD
Before accepting a diagnosis of attention-deficit disorder, consider whether your child is young for his or her grade in school. Read more >


How You See Others Says a Lot about You
How we see others says more about our own personalities than it does about theirs'. Read more >


People's Brains "Coupled" to Each Other in Good Conversation
The better we understand another, the closer our brain patterns resemble theirs, neutral coupling... Read more >


Being More Connected to Those Around You May Lengthen Your Life
Having a strong social support system rivals quitting smoking in terms of the years it can add to our lives. Read more >


Practice Makes Perfect: But Only If You Mix It Up
Changing up how you practice a new skill helps your brain learn better. Read more >


A Sniff of Insulin May Help Alzheimer's Patients
Not just for diabetics: A sniff of the hormone insulin may help recover memory in Alzheimer's... Read more >


Don't Throw Out the Rabbit's Foot: Good Luck Charms May Just Work
Have a good luck charm? It may actually help performance by boosting confidence Read more >


Is a Little Stress Good for The Body? New Research Shows It Might Help Fight Cancer
Mice "stressed" by living in stimulating environments fought cancer better than those not stressed. Read more >


TV and Video Games Can Harm Kids' Attention Spans
Limiting your child’s TV or video game time to less than two hours per day may help his or her attention. Read more >


Scanner Predicts Behavior Better than People Do
A study using MRI scans of subjects' brains found that scan results can predict behavior better... Read more >


Obesity Takes Toll on Sex Life, Sexual Health
Obese individuals report reduced sex life, more STDs, sexual dysfunction, and unwanted pregnancies. Read more >


Cartoon Characters May Sway Kids to Make Poor Food Choices
Kids say foods taste better when cartoon characters are on the label... Read more >


Parents Should Be Cautious with Autism Sites, Researchers Say
Be cautious about what websites you use for research Read more >


Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with a Side of Exercise Helps Fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia patients better manage their pain with cognitive behavior therapy and exercise. Read more >


Researchers Surprised by How the Brain and Body React to Anger-Inducing Phrases
Feelings of anger seem to make a person want to get closer to the anger-inducing stimulus... Read more >


Who Knew? Study Shows that Fathers Experience Postpartum Depression, Too
New fathers and fathers-to-be are at higher risk for depression than other men, particularly if their wives are depressed. Read more >


Overtime Ups Risk of Death from Heart Disease
People who work a great deal of overtime are at greater risk of heart-related death. Type A behavior may be partly to blame. Read more >


Does Mozart Really Make Your Kid Smarter? New Study Says "Nein."
There’s little evidence that exposing your child to Mozart will actually improve their IQ. Read more >


Mother-Infant Bonding Hormone Oxytocin May Help Those with Autism
Oxytocin, a hormone, may help some autistic kids gain social skills. Read more >


Taking a Break May Help You Remember What You Just Learned
Taking a break after absorbing new information may help you retain it better by making it easier to move into long-term memory. Read more >


Watching TV May Shorten Your Life
Spending too much time sitting in front of the TV or computer, rather than moving, raises the risk of cardiovascular disease. Read more >


Menu Labels May Mean Less Overeating
Early research suggests that putting calorie information on menus really can help reduce overeating. Read more >


Texting and Driving Don't Mix
You should NEVER text while driving. You are six times more likely to crash. Read more >


High Quality Day Care: An Escape Route for Children of Poverty
Daycare that offers children living in poverty a chance to learn school-readiness skills and exposure to role models helps them keep pace... Read more >


Getting Online Support May Help College Kids Tackle Drinking
College students who have harmful drinking patterns can be helped to rein in their drinking by receiving personalized online feedback. Read more >


Bullies and Victims Both At Risk for Future Mental Health
Both bullies and the victims of bullies may suffer from mental disorders in later life. Read more >


Researchers Find Link Between Sleep and Weight
According to findings presented earlier this month at the American Thoracic Society’s conference in San Diego, there may be an intimate – and somewhat complex – connection between how well one sleeps and his or her body weight. Read more >


Multitaskers Strike Out at Mental Abilities
People who multitask – doing several things at once – tend to have trouble filtering out distractions. Read more >


Little Boy Blue: Depression in Toddlers
What does a depressed toddler look like? He may be unable to enjoy things that used to be fun or not thinking as clearly as she used to. Read more >


Four Healthy Behaviors Make Big Impact on Disease Risk
Four important lifestyle choices – never smoking, eating healthy, staying trim, and exercising – may cut the risk... Read more >


Moderate to Heavy Drinking Significantly Increases Cancer Risk in Men
Men who consumed the most alcohol in a recent study had an up to 700% increased cancer risk. Wine appeared not to be implicated, but it is too soon.. Read more >


No Place Like Home: Premature Infants, Socioeconomic Status, and Development
As important as medical intervention is for premature infants, the home environment is just as important. Read more >


For Veterans, the War Lingers
It is no surprise: there is an epidemic of mental disorders among veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. A lack of social support... Read more >


Helping Parents Change Children's Health Habits
Having confidence in your ability to change behavior even in the face of obstacles is a critical asset for an effective parent. Read more >


Teen Smoking: The Influence of Movies and Team Sports
For teens, playing team sports helps reduce the risk of starting smoking. Read more >


Effective Schizophrenia Drug Under-Prescribed?
Clozapine, a highly effective anti-psychotic, is rarely prescribed because of its dangerous side-effects. But a new study finds...More Read more >


Daily Sex Improves the Quality of Sperm
It appears that having sex more frequently prior to trying to conceive actually improves the quality of sperm. Read more >


Being Fit — Mentally and Physically — Keeps Mind Sharp with Age
Physical fitness and a high school education are two factors that appear to decrease the risk of mental decline. Read more >


Revenge of the Cell Phones: Cell Phone Elbow
Cubital tunnel syndrome, or cell phone elbow, results from the compression of the ulnar nerve. Read more >


Sleepless in Adolescence
The Internet, television and online videos and games are all responsible for a reduction in the amount of sleep that teens receive nightly. Read more >


Turn off the TV and Talk to Your Baby
The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children do not watch TV or videos before age two years. Read more >


Drinking Alcohol May Lengthen Life, Ward off Dementia
Moderate alcohol consumption, particularly wine, can lengthen life and reduce the risk of dementia. Read more >


Lowering Job Stress May Reduce Risk for Major Depression
Job stress can raise the chances a person will experience major depression. Read more >


Be Smart, Sleep More
Sleep on! The brain may prune redundant nerve connections for faster processing while you sleep... Read more >


Loneliness Affects Mental and Physical Well Being
Even people who have a seemingly rich social network can still feel lonely or isolated. Read more >


Alcohol and the Elderly: A Potent Mix
Older adults should sit around for a while after drinking and let the alcohol metabolize before driving home. Read more >


Beginning Exercise in Middle-Age Offers Same Benefits as Long-Term
Beginning exercise -- even in mid-life -- can have a profound effect on your health. Read more >


Does Alcohol Cause Cancer?
A recent study of over one million middle-aged women suggests that drinking even small amounts of alcohol increases the risk of developing cancer. Read more >


Mood and Impulsive Behavior
One good way to curb impulsive behaviors like shopping and overeating is to find a way to delay the behavior. Read more >


The World's Most Dedicated Video Gamer
Always take breaks when you're playing video games for a long strength of time, your hands will thank you. Read more >


Pick a Guideline, Any Guideline
Exercise guidelines differ on particulars, but in generally, they agree that 30 minutes a day, four or five days a week is the goal. Read more >


Books, Games, and Computers — but Not TV — Help Ward off Memory Loss
Staying mentally active by reading or playing games (turn off the TV) are excellent ways to keep the brain "fit." Read more >


Beta Blocker Diminishes Fear Memories, New Study Reports
The amygdala is the brain structure associated with emotion. Read more >


Shedding Pounds May Be Best Done Alone, New Study Finds
Successful losers generally follow the same sort of diet and exercise plan that people who have never had a weight problem do. Read more >


A Link Between Personality and Dementia?
People who are calm and outgoing, also known as type B's, are less likely to develop dementia than those who are easily stressed... Read more >


Meditation, Anxiety, and ADHD
People with ADHD have a hard time filtering out stimuli present in the environment and deciding which deserve their attention. Read more >


Exercise Suppresses Appetite Hormones, New Research Finds
Exercise (particularly aerobic) can suppress ghrelin, the hormone that makes us feel hunger. Read more >


For a Rational Decision, Let Your Subconscious Do the Thinking
If we let our subconscious make decisions, we are more likely to make the correct ones, according to new research. In fact most... Read more >


Exposure to Alcohol in the Womb Leads to Altered Connections in the Brain
It is not clear that drinking any amount of alcohol is safe during pregnancy. Read more >


Brain Cell Starvation May Trigger Alzheimer's Disease
Alzheimer's disease may be a result of energy deprivation in the brain brought about by poor circulation causing insufficient glucose. Read more >


Happy Feet Keep Exercise Resolutions on Track
Have your feet measured before you buy athletic shoes. Exercising in tight shoes can cause a neuroma, or a pinched nerve. Read more >


Music May Be Good for the Heart, Literally
Listening to pleasurable music helps dilate blood vessels significantly, just as blood pressure medications like statins do. Read more >


Happiness Is Contagious, New Study Finds
People who rate themselves the happiest tend to be at the center of their social networks. Read more >


Sleep on It: Napping Helps Form Complex Memory
Short naps have the power to help form a complex form of memory known as relational memory. Read more >


Patients Often Misunderstand Medical Questionnaires, Study Finds
Patients often misinterpret or completely misunderstand the medical questionnaires given to them at doctors' offices. Read more >


Ingredient in Red Wine May Help Fend Off Fatty Liver Disease
The accumulation of fat in the liver can lead to such diseases as cirrhosis and fibrosis. Read more >


It's a Noisy Planet: Protect Their Hearing
Loud sounds damage the ear's hair cells, turning a lush "pasture" of these cells into a burned-out wasteland. Read more >


Location, Location, Location: Surviving Cardiac Arrest
When it comes to cardiac arrest, where you live that can make a difference. Read more >


Take 12 Bars and Call me in the Morning: Music, Mood and Illness
Listening to music you like (it does not matter what kind) can lower anxiety, reduce pain and improve mood. Read more >


Why the Brainy May Pack on the Pounds
Glucose and insulin levels fluctuate much more during mental work than during periods of relaxation. Read more >


Television's Effects on Children's Attention and Play
Television distracts children from their own play, interfering with cognitive development. Read more >


ER Patients Not Clear On Diagnosis, Treatment or After-Care
When discharged from the hospital, remember to ask questions. Read more >


Coffee Drinkers Live Longer
Coffee drinkers have a lower mortality rate, even from cardiovascular disease, according to a long-term study. Read more >


Melanoma's Alarming Rise
In order to avoid melanoma, young women should wear plenty of sunscreen and avoid the hottest parts of the day. Read more >


Fatal Medication Errors at Home on the Rise
Asking your doctor more questions and disclosing recreational drug use about your medication might help prevent a terrible accident. Read more >


Fine Young Moralists
Keep in mind that your seven-year old has a pretty good idea of the difference between right and wrong. Read more >


Treatment Twofer: Depression, Hypertension Respond to Integrated Therapy
Depression is a risk factor for hypertension. Patients with both conditions are less likely to take their anti-hypertensive medications. Read more >


Optimism Pays Off for Heart Patients
Having a positive outlook can improve a heart patient's outcome. Read more >


School Environment Affects Likelihood of Student Smoking
Students at schools that promote a caring environment among the students and teachers are less likely to smoke. Read more >


A Social Life Is a Long Life
People who need people are not only the luckiest people in the world, but also the healthiest, according to a new study that measured how a person's sense of being part of a community affects physical and mental wellbeing. Read more >


Rats on the Wagon
Researchers have found that injecting a new drug into the brains of rats causes them to lose interest in drinking alcohol almost immediately. Read more >


A Bad Night's Sleep
According to a new study, people with sleep apnea experience physical damage to parts of the brain involved in memory. Read more >


A Drink — or Two or Three — May Prevent Rheumatoid Arthritis
Smoking increases the risk or RA, but moderate drinking seems to reduce it. Read more >


How to Increase "Good" Cholesterol
Higher levels of HDL are associated with lower risk of heart attack or stroke. Read more >


It's Not Just Your Skin — Protecting Eyes from the Sun
You know that when you go to the beach you have to put on sunscreen and put up the umbrella. Read more >


Aspirin and Hypertension
Taking aspirin before bedtime is more effective for preventing hypertension. Read more >


A Weight Loss Surgery Guide
With obesity on the rise, more and more people are considering bariatric (weight loss) surgery... Read more >


Burying the "Graveyard Shift"
Simple work schedule adjustments can help ease the physiological stress of shift work... Read more >


The Down Side to Exercise: Stopping
When people stop doing any regular physical activity, they begin to lose any accrued health benefits almost immediately, according to a new study. Read more >


Fitness: Getting Where You Live Can Make a Difference
Where you live has a lot to do with how much you exercise, according to a study of Chicago neighborhoods. Read more >


CHD Patients: Exercising the Least and Needing It Most
Medical guidelines suggest a minimum of 30 minutes of moderate physical activity at least 5 days each week. Read more >


Spring Allergies: End the Suffering
The arrival of spring may be a happy occasion for birds, poets and baseball fans, but for millions of people with allergies, it is no cause for celebration. Read more >


The Teen Diet: Breakfast Every Day
It doesn't have to be bacon and eggs, but teens who want to lose weight are better off starting the day with a healthy meal. Read more >


Price and the Placebo Effect
Price matters when it comes to what people believe will help heal them, according to a new study that has received widespread media attention. Read more >


Failing the Smell Test?
Aromatherapy, the idea that scent can have a healing effect on the body, is a catchall category. Read more >


Smoking and Sleep
Regular smokers go through nightly nicotine withdrawal, which may contribute to a restless sleep and fatigue the next day. Read more >


Scratch that Itch
New research provides insight into why scratching an itch feels so good. Read more >


Look, Ma — No Cast!
For many of us, winter is ski or ice skating season. Read more >


The Chemistry of Calm
Why do some people seem to weather life's catastrophes better than others? We all know people who handle horrific experiences — violence, war or natural disaster — and move on, while others become emotionally bogged down. Read more >


Days Off
According to a new study, American workers took over a billion days off for mental health reasons. Read more >


Can't Carry a Tune?
This may come as a shock to anyone who has listened to pop music recently but true tone deafness, or amusia, as it is known to medical experts, is rare. Read more >


Pot Worse for Lungs than Cigarettes
Of all the nonsense believed by members of the drug culture, among the most ridiculous is the idea that smoking marijuana has no effect on the lungs. Read more >


Parkinson's Disease and the Environment
A new study has shown that combining two toxic substances commonly found in the environment damaged neurons associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) in mice. Read more >


Is Freedom From Pain a Right?
There is a growing international consensus in favor of the latter, according to a special article in the July 1007 issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, the official publication of the International Anesthesia Research Society. Read more >


Watch Out For Heat Stroke
What is the major cause of heat stroke? Ignorance — of our own bodies, of the weather and of what one can do to the other. Read more >


What Do You Know About Stroke?
Stroke kills over 160,000 Americans each year. Read more >


ECT — Fact and Fiction
It is hard to think of a medical treatment that has received worse press in recent decades than electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), once known as electro-shock. Read more >


Smell: the Underrated Sense?
New research shows that the brain can learn to distinguish between very small differences in smell, to a degree far beyond what was previously thought. Read more >


A New Memory Aid: Sleep
Sleep both protects and strengthens memories, according to a new study. Read more >


Good News About Coffee and Cigarettes?
People suffering from Parkinson's disease are less likely to smoke or consume high doses of caffeine than family members who do not have the disease. Read more >


Body Clocks and Sports Performance
The 24-hour rhythmic cycle of our bodies, known as circadian rhythm, significantly affects athletic performance, according to just-published research. Read more >


Blood Alcohol and Brain Injury
Traumatic brain injury victims who have been drinking moderately may be less likely to die after arriving at the hospital than those with no alcohol in their bloodstream, according to a surprising new report. Read more >


All or Nothing at All
Cutting down on smoking cigarettes — even by as much as 50% — will not help you live longer. Read more >


Childhood Trauma Linked to Adult Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
In recent years, researchers have learned more and more about how stress and psychological trauma can effect the brain and overall health. Read more >


Another Reason Not to Do Meth
Everybody knows that methamphetamine (meth, crank, crystal and speed) is a dangerous and powerfully addictive drug. Read more >


Are Menthol Cigarettes Worse for You?
It's not that menthol cigarettes are more dangerous, it's just that — for some reason — they appear to be harder to give up than regular cigarettes. Read more >


Born to Drink?
It is well known that the children of alcoholics are more likely to develop difficulties in thinking, learning and memory. Read more >


Autism and the Over-40 Dad
Children born to men age 40 and older are more likely to develop autism, according to a new study. Read more >


Marry — or Die?
Contrary to some popular wisdom — and quite a few ancient one-liners — people who never marry appear destined to die younger than married persons. Read more >


Two Ways to Quit — One New, One Old
In a tale of two anti-smoking drugs, two new aids to quitting smoking have emerged — one from the laboratory and one from the library. Read more >


You Gotta Believe — or Not
Religion may appear to be a key component of addiction recovery programs like Alcoholics Anonymous but a new study suggests that these programs are just as effective for believers as they are for non-believers. Read more >


Autism and the Brain
People with autism have fewer neurons in the amygdala, a part of the brain involved in emotion and memory. Read more >


Direct From Brain to Screen
Can an implanted computer chip help paralyzed people move? Read more >


A Case of Nerves: Genetics and Schizophrenia
A possible genetic clue to the sensory confusion of schizophrenia. Read more >


Brain Changes and Teen Depression
Adolescents diagnosed with major depressive disorder tend to have a small hippocampus, an area of the brain associated with motivation, emotion, and memory formation. Read more >


IQ Versus PTSD?
Studies of Gulf War veterans and other soldiers have taught us a lot about PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). Read more >


The Dangers of Severe Stress and Trauma
By now most of us are all-too-aware that severe stress and trauma, such as from the recent terrorist attacks, can cause what doctors call post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Read more >


Calling It Quits
The first two weeks of any person's attempt to quit smoking are critical. Read more >





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