September 02, 2014
   
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Young People with Depression Have “Hyper-Connected” Brain Networks
Alice G. Walton

The brains of depressed people have different, more intense patterns of connections. What does that mean for treatment? Read more >


Severe Depression Helped by A Combo of Antidepressants and Talk Therapy
Alice G. Walton

Antidepressants and talk therapy together may be the key to overcoming severe depression. Read more >


Lack of Motivation May Masquerade as Cognitive Decline
Alice G. Walton

As people age, it can be hard to tell whether memory or motivation is fading. Read more >


Promising New Technique for Monitoring Early Brain Development in Infants
Sami Hocine

A new technique makes it possible to predict developmental delays more accurately. Read more >


Finding Narcissists is Easy
Leslie Carr

Figuring out who is a narcissist is pretty easy. All you have to do is ask. Read more >


Good News at the Wrong Time Isn’t Good News at All
Alice G. Walton

The timing of good news is almost as important as the news itself. Read more >


Ginkgo Promotes Repair Following Stroke
Sami Hocine

The herb ginkgo biloba helped mice generate new neurons after a stroke. Can it do the same for people? Read more >


Brain Patterns Predict Stock Market Bubbles
Sami Hocine

What is it that inspires some investors to leave the market before a crash? They use a different part of their brains than the rest of us. Read more >


Synchronized Brain Waves Make Rapid Learning Possible
Sami Hocine

How are we able to shift from thinking about what's for dinner to what's happening in Iraq? It starts with humming in two brain areas. Read more >


Sun Worshipper or Sun Addict?
Leslie Carr

Some people need the sun the way an alcoholic needs a drink. And the health risks can be just as severe. Read more >


An Obsession with Popularity Can Handicap Teens' Social Development
Esther Entin, M.D.

Kids obsessed with who's cool may be less popular later in life. They don't know how to make friends. Read more >


Engineering Memories with Light
Sami Hocine

Using light, researchers have been able to create, extinguish and re-create a memory. The finding may offer help people with PTSD or memory loss. Read more >


Discrimination and Favoritism May Be The Same Thing
Alice G. Walton

We think of discrimination as being about hate and holding certain people back. But it can be just the opposite. Read more >


Psilocybin Shows Potential As Treatment for Depression
Leslie Carr

Psilocybin, found in certain mushrooms, appears to help prevent depression and anxiety by enhancing mood. Read more >


The Stress of Family Conflicts Increases the Risk of Premature Death
Charlotte LoBuono

The stress of conflict in our relationships with family and friends can actually shorten our lives. Pick your battles. Read more >


Apathy, Inactivity, and Brain Atrophy
Esther Entin, M.D.

The prospect of dementia haunts people over 50, but what they ought to fear is apathy and inactivity. Read more >


Marijuana's Bad Effects on the Brain
Michael J. Gertner

Marijuana may ease the pain and nausea associated with chemotherapy, but it also leaves certain brain areas abnormally enlarged. Read more >


Let's Talk About It Over Dinner: When Blood Sugar Drops, Anger Levels Rise
Alice G. Walton

Couples get angrier with each other when they are hungry, and they have the voodoo dolls to prove it. Read more >


Stress Makes Allergies Worse
Leslie Carr

Stress appears to make allergies worse. Calming the mind can help. Read more >


Violent Video Games and Aggression
Esther Entin, M.D.

Playing violent video games makes kids prone to seeing others as hostile and acting aggressively. Read more >


With Hormone Replacement Therapy, Timing and Formulation Matter
Charlotte LoBuono

Some forms of hormone replacement therapy help keep women's brain metabolism rolling. But others may cause problems. Read more >


New Hints at The Brain Chemistry Behind Anxiety
Michael J. Gertner

The brain chemistry of people with anxiety may make it more difficult for them to turn off activity. Luckily, there appears to be a way to change this. Read more >


Scientists Begin to Understand Why Autism Is More Common in Boys Than Girls
Alice G. Walton

Now we know why boys are more genetically susceptible to autism. Read more >


In Relationships, A Good Foundation Matters More than Communication
Alice G. Walton

Conflict happens, and can even make relationships stronger. But you need one ingredient. Read more >


Can Childhood Memories Be Trusted?
Neil Wagner

Our memory for childhood events is usually modest. The details we recall are often added later. Read more >


Chronic Stress Disrupts Balance Between White and Gray Matter in the Brain
Michael J. Gertner

Chronic stress appears to alter the balance of white to gray brain matter. This may explain several mental disorders. Read more >


Neurofeedback: High Tech Mind Control
Neil Wagner

What if epileptics could learn to prevent their own seizures using neurofeedback? MEG scans may make it possible. Read more >


A Possible Biological Basis for Religiosity
Michael J. Gertner

People who are religious have thicker cortices than those who aren't. So which causes what? Read more >


Vitamin E Could Slow Alzheimer's Progress
Neil Wagner

Vitamin E may help slow the mental decline of seniors with Alzheimer's Disease, allowing them to remain independent longer. Read more >


Caffeine's Memory-Boosting Abilities
Charlotte LoBuono

Your morning coffee doesn't just wake you up; it can help you remember things more clearly. Read more >


Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Diagnoses on The Rise
Esther Entin, M.D.

More and more children are being diagnosed and treated for attention deficits. Is this a good thing? Read more >


Catching Alzheimer's Decline Before It Starts
Michael J. Gertner

Scientists have found where Alzheimer's begins in the brain. Read more >


A Different Approach to Self-Control
Neil Wagner

Our willpower can fail us when we are tired or stressed. But how we view the problem could be the problem. Read more >


Music: A Roadmap to Forgotten Memories?
Neil Wagner

Some songs call up old memories. They may also help brain-injured patients remember their past. Read more >


Brain Training Can Help Prevent Cognitive Decline in the Years to Come
Alice G. Walton

Training sessions can protect aging brains against cognitive decline — up to a decade later. Read more >


Meditation May Help Relieve Anxiety, Depression, and Pain
Charlotte LoBuono

Don't Medicate, Meditate Read more >


A Sense of Smell Is Highly Personal
Michael J. Gertner

No two people smell the same scent the same way. The difference lies in the cocktail of amino acids your genes produce. Read more >


Physical Brain Injuries Increase Likelihood of PTSD
Neil Wagner

Physical injury to the the brain also raises the risk of post-traumatic stress. Read more >


Student-Teacher Relationships Are Key to Early Education
Alice G. Walton

Teachers' responsiveness to preschoolers' questions and needs is even more important than what's being taught. Read more >


Another Study Links Pesticides to Parkinson’s Disease
Alice G. Walton

In the lab, exposure to pesticides caused Parkinson's. Genes matter, too. Read more >


Men and Women's Neural Networks Reflect Sex Differences
Michael J. Gertner

A new kind of brain scan tells us a lot about why women are better at meetings and men at maps. Read more >


Sacrosine Shows Promise As a New Way to Relieve Depression
Neil Wagner

Sarcosine, found in muscles and other body tissues, improved mood better than a popular antidepressant. Read more >


Decision-Making Linked to Motivation, Depression
Michael J. Gertner

Decisions, motivation and depression all seem to reside in the same areas of the brain. Read more >


Promising New Treatment for Seizures Related to Liver Disease
Michael J. Gertner

A blood pressure medication already approved for human use may prevent seizures. Read more >


Psychobiotics, A Possible New Treatment for Depression
Alice G. Walton

We know probiotics are good for GI heath. They may also affect mental health. Read more >


Musical Training Improves the Brain's Sensitivity to Sound, Speech
Charlotte LoBuono

People who have studied music for a few years tend to hear better because their brains process sounds more rapidly. Read more >


How Couples Use Texting Can Bring Them Closer, Drive Them Apart
Charlotte LoBuono

Text messages offer lovers another way to whisper endearments. But some texts just shouldn't be sent. Read more >


Exercise During Pregnancy Can Improve Infant Brain Development
Neil Wagner

Exercise makes pregnancy and childbirth easier. It also seems to boost infant brain development. Read more >


Monkey Mind, A Memoir of Anxiety
Daniel Smith



Brief School Counseling Program Helps Teens Cope
Neil Wagner

Offering teens a couple sessions of therapy can go a long way to nipping mental health problems in the bud. Read more >


Brain Changes Are Seen in More Ex-Football Players
Alice G. Walton

Former football players may have "pronounced" brain abnormalities, even if they do not have dementia. Read more >


Memory and Forgetting: It's All about the Networks
Michael J. Gertner

Memory and forgetting go hand-in-hand. Now we know that network coordination is more important than brain activation. Read more >


High Blood Sugar Linked to Dementia Risk
Alice G. Walton

The higher your blood sugar, the greater your risk for dementia, whether you have diabetes or not. Read more >


The Message of A Messy Desk
Neil Wagner

Disorderly environments can foster creativity. Read more >


NVC -- Cerebral Blood Flow and Mental Processing: The Case for Cocoa
Charlotte LoBuono

Our brains use blood the way a Formula 1 car guzzles gas. Cocoa appears to help keep blood flowing. Read more >


Facebook Use May Reduce Happiness, Not Enhance It
Alice G. Walton

Facebook may actually increase sadness. Be sure to make time to connect for real. Read more >


Discovery Suggests A Surprising Culprit in Alzheimer's and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases
Michael J. Gertner

New Alzheimer's disease discovery -- how it's "like a fire burning through the brain." Read more >


Scientists Succeed in Creating a False Memory
Michael J. Gertner

It's not quite "Inception," but scientists have invaded the brains of mice and made fake memories. Read more >


Brain Development Appears Influenced by Regular Bedtimes
Alice G. Walton

Regular bedtimes for kids are important for brain development. Read more >


Self-Help That Works
John C. Norcross, PhD, Linda F. Campbell, PhD, John M. Grobal, PsyD, John W. Santrock, PhD, Florin Selagea, MS and Robert Sommer



Study Finds Probiotics in Yogurt Affect Brain
Michael J. Gertner

You really are what you eat. The probiotics in yogurt actually change the chemistry of your brain. Read more >


Brain Exercises Can Help Breast Cancer Survivors with “Chemo Brain”
Alice G. Walton

Cognitive exercises can help improve brain function after chemotherapy. Read more >


Our Fear of Missing Out
Neil Wagner

The fear of missing out — we all suffer from it at times, but social media is making it worse. Read more >


Public Pre-K Exceeds Its Goals
Alice G. Walton

Pre-K programs can help kids with school readiness and bring unexpected side benefits that last a lifetime. Read more >


Why Overheard Cell Phone Conversations Are So Annoying
Neil Wagner

Why that guy on the cell phone at the table next to you is so annoying. Read more >


Exercise Improves Self Control, Decision-Making
Charlotte LoBuono

Exercise can help us exert more self control. It enhances the brain's ability to solve problems, plan, and make decisions. Read more >


Lasting Brain Damage from Even A Single Concussion
Neil Wagner

Even a single concussion can result in reduced brain volume and impaired emotional and executive functioning. Take time to recover. Read more >


Deep Brain Stimulation Disrupts OCD
Neil Wagner

Obsessions and compulsions are the result of excessive brain activity, not anxiety. DBS can help. Read more >


It's Not How Close You Feel, It's How Close You Want to Be
Neil Wagner

Not everyone desires the same level of intimacy. What matters is whether you and your partner have the same need. Read more >


Bullying Leaves Long-Lasting Psychological Effects
Charlotte LoBuono

The effects of bullying can be long-lasting, especially for those who have been both bully and victim. Read more >


Parkinson's Treatment Can Unlock Creativity
Neil Wagner

The medications Parkinson's patients take can cause a wonderful side effect — a flowering of creativity. Read more >


Aging Brains, Disrupted Sleep, and Impaired Memory
Charlotte LoBuono

Aging disrupts slow-wave sleep and memory. But better, memory restoring sleep is possible. Read more >


The Myth of Multitasking
Charlotte LoBuono

To the guy checking his mail as he talks on the phone: you aren't efficient; you're distracted. Read more >


Resource Center: Stress



Speaking Two or More Languages May Slow Cognitive Decline
Charlotte LoBuono

Attention! Atención! Achtung! More evidence that the mental challenges of our youth have long-term benefits. Read more >


Flavor Comes in Many Colors
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Cocoa served in cups of a certain color tastes better. Read more >


Surprise! You Won't Be Who You Think You Are
Alice G. Walton

As we age, we tend to think we are pretty much done changing. But the truth is there is more to come. Read more >


Kindness Is a Key to Kids' Happiness and Popularity
Alice G. Walton

When kids are encouraged to be kinder, they also end up being happier and more popular. Read more >


Resource Center: Emotional Health



Fructose on the Brain: How the Infamous Sugar Affects Appetite
Alice G. Walton

Fructose, the sugar in high fructose corn syrup, appears to leave the brain craving more food. Read more >


Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents
Esther Entin, M.D.

Moodiness is not uncommon in kids, so how do you know if your child or teen is suffering from mood swings related to this disorder? Read more >


Study Skills and Motivation More Important to Math Than Smarts
Alice G. Walton

Math is not all about smarts. Motivation and going beyond rote memorization are more important. Read more >


How Old is Too Old for Santa?
Neil Wagner

Concerned about telling your children about Santa? A psychologist says, back off. Read more >


Nature Ignites a Creative Spark
Charlotte LoBuono

Spending time in nature spurs creativity. Read more >


Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Antidepressant-Resistant Depression
Neil Wagner

Antidepressants don't help everyone. A new study finds that one kind of psychotherapy can improve the odds. Read more >


Aromatherapy Can Lower Heart Rate, Blood Pressure
Neil Wagner

Exposure to certain scents can lower heart rate and BP. Just don't inhale them for too long. Read more >


Short Bursts of Physical Activity Can Boost Your Memory
Alice G. Walton

Short bursts of activity can help memory, for people with memory problems and those without. Read more >


How Our Brain Gets Us Motivated
Alice G. Walton

Tracking the brain circuits involved in motivation and depression. Read more >


A Ball by Any Other Name: How Dogs Process Language
Alice G. Walton

When your dog hears a human word, he processes it his own way. This could be helpful for training. Read more >


Meditation: Changing the Mind for the Better
Neil Wagner

Meditation changes the brain differently, depending on the type of meditation you practice. Read more >


Kids' Generosity Needs Monitors
Alice G. Walton

Is our “ungenerosity” innate? Read more >


Physical Activity Supports Brain Structure, Boosts Brain Power
Charlotte LoBuono

Being physically active can help prevent the brain shrinkage that accompanies aging. Read more >


Cyberbullying in Offices is More Common Than You Might Think
Alice G. Walton

Bullying doesn't just happen at school. Cyberbullying at work can affect your mental health. Read more >


Are You Teflon or Velcro When It Comes to Stress?
Leslie Carr

Some people find it pretty easy to shed a stressful day, but for others, it lingers... Read more >


Puzzle Interviews Unpopular with Job Applicants
Neil Wagner

As if looking for work wasn't hard enough: now interviews feature "trick" questions designed to... Read more >


Screen Media Hinders Child Development
Charlotte LoBuono

Screen time is physiologically distinct from other sedentary activities like reading or being read to. And that's a problem. Read more >


Xanax, Valium Linked to Dementia in the Elderly
Neil Wagner

When elderly people take benzodiazepines such as Ativan, Valium and Xanax, their risk of dementia goes up 50%. Read more >


Ketamine Research Leads to the First New Depression Drugs in Decades
Neil Wagner

Ketamine is a pediatric anesthetic, a club drug, and now, the most promising antidepressant... Read more >


Off-Label Antipsychotic Use Continues to Rise, Especially in Children
Neil Wagner

Off-label prescribing for kids is way up. So are their serious side effects. The search for... Read more >


Learning to Identify Negative Emotions May Be Important in Battling Depression
Alice G. Walton

Learning to identify your emotions may help with depression. It's not as easy as it sounds. Read more >


Progress on Two Fronts in Our Understanding of Autism
Alice G. Walton

Researchers may have found a treatment for one form of autism. Read more >


Molecularly Targeted Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors
Nicole A. Shonka, M.D. and Mark R. Gilbert, M.D.

Chemotherapies for glioblastomas aim to prevent tumor cell growth or promote cell death. Read more >


An Experimental Drug May Address the Cognitive Problems of PTSD
Alice G. Walton

Post-traumatic stress disorder is more than anxiety. A new drug may help the cognitive problems... Read more >


A Gene May Help Explain Happiness in Women, Not Men
Alice G. Walton

A gene previously dubbed the "warrior gene" because of its links to aggression may also be linked... Read more >


Can Memories Be Strengthened During Sleep?
Neil Wagner

But don't try it in place of studying. The brain does pick up, or at least cement, information while Read more >


The Complicated Relationship between Alcohol and Anxiety
Alice G. Walton

Alcohol addiction may rewire the brain so that it can't rebound from stress. PTSD suffers may want.. Read more >


Glial Cells
R. Douglas Fields, Ph.D.

Glia were completely overlooked until it was discovered that Einstein's brain was packed with them. Read more >


Compounds in Cocoa May Boost Brain Power
Charlotte LoBuono

Seniors who took higher concentrations of cocoa flavanols had improvements on cognitive tests... Read more >


The Things We Forget to Do: How to Remember Them
Neil Wagner

Forgetting to do what we intend to do is common. There are ways, however, to remember the milk... Read more >


Study of Rituals Provides Insight Into Human Logic and Reasoning
Charlotte LoBuono

Rituals tend to provide a level of comfort, a sense of control. They also tell us a bit about... Read more >


Researchers Discover A Massive "Plumbing" Network in the Brain
Alice G. Walton

We thought we knew how the brain cleans itself out. Then a completely unexpected... Read more >


Lying Eyes: Just a Myth?
Neil Wagner

A widely accepted method for telling if someone is telling the truth just went out the window... Read more >


The Power of Good Deeds
Neil Wagner

When faced with uncertainty, we are more likely to believe in the power of good deeds.... Read more >


Could Some Dementias Be Autoimmune Diseases?
Alice G. Walton

One form of dementia may be the result of the immune system going haywire. Luckily, there might be.. Read more >


Alternative Medicine: Does the Research Support the Movement? Part 3: Yoga
Alice G. Walton

Yoga has some proven benefits and unproven claims. What you can, and can't, expect it to do for you. Read more >


A Brain Chemical That Makes Bad Memories Disappear
Alice G. Walton

Researchers discover why anxiety can persist for months or years after a stressful event. It's all about a brain chemical. Read more >


Give Me More Space: A Novel Strategy For Dyslexic Readers
Esther Entin, M.D.

It appears that having more space around letters and words makes it easier for people with dyslexia to understand printed text. Read more >


Experience Taking: How Good Books Can Change You
Neil Wagner

Reading a book can actually change who you are, teaching you about yourself as you live through... Read more >


Age and the Brain: Use It or Lose It
Neil Wagner

The way to keep the aging brain in shape is keep it occupied. It's as if your mind were asking "what have you done for me lately?" Read more >


Oxytocin May Hold Even More Promise for Treating Symptoms of Autism
Alice G. Walton

Oxytocin, the mother-infant bonding hormone, activates the "social" areas of the brain.... Read more >


Computer Time Could Prevent Cognitive Decline (But Don't Forget to Exercise)
Alice G. Walton

Computer time along with physical activity may prevent cognitive decline. Read more >


The Mainstreaming of Alternative Medicine: Does the Research Support the Movement? Part 2: Meditation
Alice G. Walton

Meditation increases the size of brain areas associated with memory and reduces our vulnerability to stress. Read more >


A Three-Hour Therapy Session Could Treat Arachnophobia
Alice G. Walton

People so afraid of spiders that they wouldn't walk on grass were cured of their phobia with... Read more >


Rhythmic Neural Patterns Drive Movement
Leslie Carr

Neurons firing in the brain produce organized movement in the body. But how? It may take a neural... Read more >


Traumatic Brain Injuries May Be Rising for Young Football Players
Alice G. Walton

Fatal brain injuries in high school football players rose last year. Read more >


The Biology of Kindness and Well Being
Neil Wagner

Everyday experiences change the brain. Researchers consider the effects of well being and kindness.. Read more >


Being Aware of Your Own Mortality Can Make for a Better Life
Alice G. Walton

Being aware of our mortality can actually help us live richer, fuller lives. Read more >


Puttering About Could Reduce Your Risk for Alzheimer's Disease
Alice G. Walton

The simplest activities, even housework, can reduce your risk for cognitive decline. Read more >


Vitamin D, Sunscreen and Children's Brainpower
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

If you use sunscreen to protect your child's skin, are you also preventing vitamin D synthesis... Read more >


A Snapshot of Stress Across the Generations
Alice G. Walton

The Millennial generation is more stressed than generations before. They are also less able to cope. Read more >


Study Illuminates How We Categorize Information and Make Decisions
Michael J. Gertner

Quick categorization is a skill that streamlines thought. Now we know more about how it occurs. Read more >


Losing Weight May Not Change Body Image
Alice G. Walton

Losing weight may not make body image issues disappear. Read more >


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Certain brain centers are less active in chronic fatigue syndrome patients, suggesting a new... Read more >


Ladies, There's No Turning Back the Biological Clock
Alice G. Walton

Delaying motherhood may mean forgoing motherhood. But there are options if you think ahead. Read more >


How Marijuana Impairs Memory
Neil Wagner

Cannabinoid receptors are found on glial cells as well as neurons, raising new prospects for pot... Read more >


A Positive Outlook Helps the Heart
Leslie Carr

Having a positive outlook has been associated with improved cardiovascular health and recovery. It's about healthy behaviors. Read more >


Blood Test Can Reliably Diagnose Teen Depression
Michael J. Gertner

Markers found in a simple blood test reliably distinguished depressed teens from those who weren't.. Read more >


Looking through the Eyes Helps Doctors See into the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Measuring degeneration of the eye could tell us if it is also occurring in the brain. Read more >


Who Will Divorce?
Alice G. Walton

Even the happiest newlyweds can go on to divorce. But early warning signs might predict who does... Read more >


Failing Has Its Benefits For Kids
Alice G. Walton

Teaching kids that failing is a part of learning can give them the confidence to do well. Read more >


Brain's Wiring Resembles 3D Street Map
Neil Wagner

Remarkable scans of a monkeys' brain completely change our understanding of how the brain is wired.. Read more >


Rosemary Oil May Boost Brain Function
Neil Wagner

People performed better on certain math tasks when they had inhaled a little whiff of rosemary... Read more >


Brain Cells Benefit from the Company of Others
Alice G. Walton

Brain connections that form when we learn something new are strengthened when there are friends near Read more >


Parent Training Could Help Manage the Difficult Behaviors of Autism
Alice G. Walton

Training parents helps them help their children behave better.... Read more >


Neuroethics: The Brain Sciences Pose Ethical - and Philosophical - Conundrums
Martha J. Farah, Ph.D. and Jonathan D. Moreno, Ph.D.

Neuroethics asks, if your high test score is the work of a brain-enhancing drug, is it fair? What is neuromarketing anyway? Read more >


A Connection between Cognition and Personality
Alice G. Walton

When seniors improve their cognitive skills, their personalities also get a boost. Read more >


Why Brain Imaging Studies Can Be Misleading
Neil Wagner

Brain scans provide valuable information, but their meaning is often oversimplified. Read more >


Punch Drunk: Repetitive Brain Injury
Alice G. Walton

Chronic head injuries can cause dementia, violence and death. Helmets may not help. Read more >


Physical Punishment Takes A Toll on Kids' Mental Health
Alice G. Walton

Physical punishment does more harm than good to a child and encourages aggressive behavior. Other methods are more effective. Read more >


Can Overeating Cause Memory Loss?
Neil Wagner

Overeating has been linked to some forms of memory loss. Read more >


Humble People to the Rescue
Alice G. Walton

Need help? Call on your humble friends. Those who are arrogant may let you down. Read more >


The Need to Feel Connected
Neil Wagner

Our need to connect is so strong that being ignored or given the air gaze, bothers us... Read more >


The Internet as Matchmaker
Alice G. Walton

Internet dating is one of the top methods for finding love, whether the pros outweigh the cons... Read more >


More Education Improves IQ
Alice G. Walton

An extra year or two of education can raise IQ significantly, even if the students are already teens Read more >


Gossip Can Be Good
Alice G. Walton

Some kinds of gossip may actually benefit your health. Read more >


Early Results Promising for New Alzheimer Drug
Michael J. Gertner

Different from drugs designed to clear amyloid plaques, a new compound, J147, prevents - and stops - Alzheimer's Disease Read more >


Oxytocin Could Help Introverts Feel More Outgoing
Alice G. Walton

The mother-baby bonding hormone, oxytocin, made introverts feel more outgoing and trusting. Read more >


Uncovering Why Marijuana Has Opposing Effects on the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Smoking pot can make people calm, anxious, or even psychotic. A study reveals the chemical culprit.. Read more >


The Connection Between Good Nutrition and Good Cognition Becomes Clearer
Alice G. Walton

Good nutrition and brain health go hand in hand; changing your diet can help protect your brain. Read more >


Adrenal Hormone DHEA For Menopause Symptoms
Alice G. Walton

The hormone DHEA sounds like a miracle: it may ease menopause symptoms and boost sexual interest. Read more >


Depression: Paving the Road to Recovery
Neil Wagner

People who suffer from depression can learn to overcome their tendency to overgeneralize and ruminate about difficulties. Read more >


Understanding the Roots of Social Prejudice Could Help Us Counteract It
Alice G. Walton

A new look at prejudice finds it may mostly exist just because we're afraid of germs. Read more >


Brain Tsunamis Increase Head Trauma Destruction
Michael J. Gertner

Brain tsunamis increase head trauma destruction the way their watery counterparts wipe out homes... Read more >


Important Link in the Stress Response Could Mean Better Treatment
Alice G. Walton

Researchers discover an important step in the stress response, which, if blocked, could stop... Read more >


Children and Family Violence
Esther Entin, M.D.

The brains of children exposed to family violence show changes similar to those of soldiers... Read more >


A Better Way to Reduce Prejudice
Alice G. Walton

When people are told to be less prejudiced, they are often more so. There's a better way. Read more >


Autism Spectrum Disorders Linked to a Variety of Genetic Mutations
Michael J. Gertner

Autism spectrum disorders are increasingly being linked to different genetic mutations... Read more >


Nanomembrane Probe Provides a New Window into the Brain
Michael J. Gertner

A new ultra-thin probe enables scientists to gather information about brain activity without invasiv Read more >


Text Messaging Doubles Smokers' Quit Rate
Neil Wagner

A British study had double the quit rate thanks to support and tips delivered by cell phone... Read more >


An Over-Abundance of Neurons Linked to Autism
Esther Entin, M.D.

Runaway neuronal growth in the prefrontal cortex, in the brains of kids with autism. Read more >


New Research Broadens Our Understanding of Alzheimer's
Alice G. Walton

A new study uncovers a major surprise in the Alzheimer's puzzle. Read more >


The "Rich Clubs" Make up an Elite Network in the Brain
Alice G. Walton

"Rich Club" clusters of highly influential regions of brain cells do serious collaboration. Read more >


Gestational BPA Linked to Developmental Problems in Girls, Not Boys
Alice G. Walton

Higher BPA levels during pregnancy are linked to cognitive and emotional problems in children. Read more >


Measuring Happiness Now Could Predict Death Risk Years Later
Alice G. Walton

Happiness measured at one point in time was linked to lower mortality five years later. Read more >


Poverty and Mental Illness: Can the Vicious Cycle be Broken?
Esther Entin, M.D.

The economic benefits of offering mental health help to those living in poverty are enormous. Read more >


New Ways to Protect the Brain from Stroke
Alice G. Walton

Drugs to reduce the brain's immense energy needs may serve to help preserve it when its blood supply Read more >


Seasonal Affective Disorder: Coming Out of the Cold
Alice G. Walton

Seasonal affective disorder occurs when a lack of sun disrupts the body's circadian and serotonin cycles. It a real form of depression. Read more >


Cartoon Viewing Reduces Children's Higher Cognitive Functioning
Esther Entin, M.D.

Fast-paced cartoons and other shows can reduce, at least temporarily, children's ability to plan and organize. Read more >


Movies of the Mind
Neil Wagner

Brain scans taken while researchers all watched the same film were used to reveal what they saw... Read more >


The Brain Can Form New Connections between Cells into Young Adulthood
Alice G. Walton

Contrary to popular belief, the brain can form new connections into adulthood... Read more >


Embarrassment is Linked to Dependability, Generosity
Alice G. Walton

People who become embarrassed more readily are also more dependable and generous. Read more >


The Mind's Eye
Oliver Sacks



Can Parents Complete with Clever Marketing to Kids?
Alice G. Walton

It's hard to compete with clever marketing, but you can help your kids make better food choices with consistent encouragement. Read more >


Online Gamers Help Solve Mystery of Critical AIDS Virus Enzyme
Alice G. Walton

A team of online gamers helps researchers solve a critical piece of the AIDS puzzle... Read more >


Researchers Show that "Paying Attention" May Distort Reality
Alice G. Walton

The mind is notorious for playing tricks, but researchers discover paying attention can mislead us.. Read more >


Everybody Thinks They're Typical
Neil Wagner

What does a typical American or European or African look like? It depends on whom you ask... Read more >


Breastfeeding May Help Brain Development
Alice G. Walton

Infants, particularly preemies, who were breastfed scored higher on reasoning and language tests at age 5. Read more >


How We React to Stress Influences Performance
Alice G. Walton

How you interpret your stress can influence how you perform on tests. Read more >


Researchers Unravel How Stress Leads to Depression
Alice G. Walton

Stress can lead to depression, but new brain cells may be responsible for stopping the process... Read more >


Can Old-Age Memory Loss Be Reversed?
Neil Wagner

In aging brains cyclic AMP, a cytokine, weakens cell firing, slowing working memory. Blocking it... Read more >


Generalized Anxiety and Interpersonal Relationship Problems Deeply Intertwined
Alice G. Walton

People with anxiety often have problematic social relationships, partly as a result of their worries Read more >


Blue Again: Antidepressants May Lead to Future Depression
Neil Wagner

For all the good they do, antidepressants may lead to another bout of depression. Here's why... Read more >


Overeating Explained by Three Neurological Processes, Not Laziness
Alice G. Walton

Overeating involves neurological processes involving impulse control and reward, not laziness. Read more >


Eating Disorder or Disordered Eating?
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Eating disorder or disordered eating? The distinction is fuzzy, but stopping early is key. Read more >


Learning to Be Positive May Help Beat Depression
Alice G. Walton

Positive activity intervention (PAI) such as writing letters of gratitude or performing acts of kindness, may help mild depression. Read more >


Pets Are Good For Everyone, Not Just "Pet People"
Neil Wagner

Pet owners score higher on a variety of measures of healthy adjustment... Read more >


Speech Processing May Be at the Heart of Dyslexia
Alice G. Walton

The root of dyslexia may be in speech processing, a surprise to researchers... Read more >


How to Mess up Your Kids
Alice G. Walton

Twelve things parents do that can damage their children. How to avoid such mistakes. Read more >


Certain Personality Traits Linked to More Weight Gain
Alice G. Walton

People who have certain personality traits, like impulsivity and cynicism, are more likely to gain weight over time. Read more >


The Invisible Epidemic: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Memory and the Brain
J. Douglas Bremner, M.D.



The Causes Of Autism: So Many Theories. So Few Answers.
Esther Entin, M.D.

What causes autism? What can parents do to avoid it? Early environments matter. Read more >


Training in Positive Thinking Helps Teens Interpret Life in Healthier Ways
Alice G. Walton

A simple computer program seems to help teens avoid negative thinking, which may help with anxiety.. Read more >


Eight Surprisingly Simple Ways to Boost Your Performance
Alice G. Walton

Doing your best is a balancing act involving practice, calmness and drive. What research has found. Read more >


ADHD and The Risk of Substance Abuse
Esther Entin, M.D.

Why are kids and adolescents with ADHD prone to substance use? Read more >


Scientists Gain Clues into How Imagination Affects Actions
Alice G. Walton

New research shows how our ability to imagine affects our reactions and our ability to plan... Read more >


Buying Flashy Cars Does Not Marriage Material Make
Alice G. Walton

Men who engage in “conspicuous spending” (think Porsches) have one thing on their minds... Read more >


Pediatric Mental Health Emergencies: Where are they Treated?
Esther Entin, M.D.

Too often, children with behavioral or emotional issues are taken to the ER. Read more >


Stressful Events Lead to Unexpected Reaction in Panic Patients
Alice G. Walton

You might think people with panic disorder would fall apart in a crisis, but that's not the case... Read more >


New Approach Increases the Usefulness of Brain Scans
Neil Wagner

A new technique enables researchers to view patterns of activity within the whole brain... Read more >


Kids' Brains Change as They Learn New Math Skills
Alice G. Walton

Children's brains change as they learn math skills. Adults' too, hopefully. Read more >


The Roots of Body Dysmorphic Disorder
Alice G. Walton

People with body dysmorphic disorder have problems in the brain's visual processing system. Read more >


The Color Red Boosts Speed and Intensity of Performance
Alice G. Walton

Looking at the color red actually boosts the strength and speed of our physical reactions. Read more >


Violence in Cartoons Does Not Make Them More Enjoyable
Alice G. Walton

Contrary to popular belief, kids do not enjoy violent cartoons any more than nonviolent ones... Read more >


Dogs Can Make Medical Procedures Less Threatening
Neil Wagner

The presence of a therapy dog can help reduce the anxiety of patients waiting for an MRI - unless... Read more >


The Agony of Ecstasy: Permanent Brain Changes
Neil Wagner

The club drug Ecstasy produces changes in brain chemistry. But these may not be the type of changes. Read more >


Elusive Manhood: Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow
Neil Wagner

Little things - like being asked to hold a purse - can make men feel their manhood has been... Read more >


Cooperation and Guilt Linked in the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Do we cooperate with others to experience positive feelings or avoid the bad ones? Read more >


Pesticide Exposure May Affect Kids' Cognitive Function
Alice G. Walton

A banned residential pesticide is linked to lower IQ in kids. Read more >


When Neurons Nap, Mistakes are Made
Alice G. Walton

In sleep-deprived rats random brain cells take "naps" while the animal is awake... Read more >


Alcoholism May Be Linked to Impulsivity Gene, Brain Differences
Alice G. Walton

People with alcoholism in the family tend to have a genetic variation affecting impulsivity. Environmental factors also play a role. Read more >


Clues to Why Meditation Relieves Pain
Neil Wagner

A very simple form of meditation has been found to help reduce pain as well or better than morphine. Read more >


Liberal or Conservative? It's All in the Head
Neil Wagner

Conservatives and liberals really are different. It's not just their beliefs. It's their brains. Read more >


FDA Panel Votes to Reject Warning Labels on Artificially Colored Foods: Good Move?
Alice G. Walton

Some studies show a link between artificial dyes and ADHD. So why did the FDA reject warning labels? Read more >


Physical and Emotional Pain Have Similar Effect on the Brain
Alice G. Walton

The emotional pain of romantic relationship break-up has the same effect on the brain as physical... Read more >


Omega-3 Supplements May Ease PMS
Alice G. Walton

Omega-3 fatty acids supplements may help ease symptoms in women who suffer from PMS. Read more >


Food for Thought: What the Ultimate Organ Needs to Stay Healthy
Alice G. Walton

Some foods can help you feel, think and remember better. You may know about blueberries, but curcumin? Read more >


Brain Areas Take On New Functions
Alice G. Walton

Brain scans show how the visual cortex of blind people is recruited by the brain to help process... Read more >


Ibuprofen May Stave off Parkinson's Disease
Alice G. Walton

Ibuprofen appears to offer protection against Parkinson's disease. Brain inflammation may be the... Read more >


The Larger the Society, the More Outstanding Its Members
Alice G. Walton

A study has found that the larger the society, the more distinctive its members tend to become. Read more >


Cancer Patients on Opioid Drugs Have More Cognitive Deficits
Alice G. Walton

Cancer patients on opioid painkillers often experience confusion, disorientation and forgetfulness. Read more >


Exercise Boosts Tests Scores, Thinking Ability
Neil Wagner

Intelligence scores rose by four points with just 40 minutes of play a day... Read more >


"Talk Therapy" May Rewire the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Anxious? Cognitive behavior therapy can help. The changes it brings can be seen in the brain itself. Read more >


Exercise May Be Best Bet for IBS Sufferers
Alice G. Walton

Exercise significantly reduces the severity of IBS symptoms. Read more >


Pencils Better Than Pixels When It Comes to Learning
Alice G. Walton

Writing by hand promotes learning far more than pressing a key. So what are we to do? Read more >


Meditation Changes the Cells of the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Meditation changes the brain, with areas related to learning and memory expanding and areas related to anxiety, contracting. Read more >


Menopause Symptoms Are Linked to Reduced Breast Cancer Risk, Say Researchers
Alice G. Walton

Hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause may actually have a protective effect when it comes to certain cancers. Read more >


Kids' Friends May Be Big Influence on Grades
Alice G. Walton

Kids' friends may have a bigger influence on how well they do in school than parents do. Read more >


New Research Shows Us Why We Should Listen to the Heart
Alice G. Walton

Do people listen to their bodies have better instincts when it comes to making intuitive decisions? Read more >


New ESP Study Has Scientific Community Up In Arms
Alice G. Walton

New study reports evidence of ESP and stirs debate. Critics say we need reevaluate before believing. Read more >


Mediterranean Diet May Keep the Brain Young
Alice G. Walton

Eating a Mediterranean-style diet significantly slows cognitive decline in seniors. Read more >


Can "Good" Cholesterol Help the Brain, Like the Heart, Stay Fit?
Alice G. Walton

In addition to helping your heart, higher levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol may reduce your risk of Alzheimer's disease. Read more >


The Mind Works Better When It's Happy
Neil Wagner

We tend to think more creatively and flexibly when we are happy. Read more >


Scientists Make Big Strides in Understanding the Cause of Alzheimer's
Alice G. Walton

It is not that Alzheimer's brains overproduce dangerous plaques; they have trouble getting rid of... Read more >


Is a Wandering Mind an Unhappy Mind?
Neil Wagner

What are you thinking of right now? Was your mind wandering? Happier people tend to have minds focused on the present moment. Read more >


When One Half of the Brain Is Damaged, the Other Half Compensates
Alice G. Walton

When part of the brain is damaged, it often gets an assist from undamaged areas to pick up the slack Read more >


New Mothers' Brains May Grow Larger
Alice G. Walton

The thrill and pleasure of a new baby appear to stimulate brain growth, particularly in areas... Read more >


Close Friends "Light Up" The Brain
Alice G. Walton

Close friends activate "social" areas of your brain more than strangers do. Read more >


Literate Mothers Boost Children's Test Scores
Neil Wagner

For young children in poor communities, having a mom who reads is a huge boost to school success. Read more >


Paying with Cash Curbs Junk Food Spending
Alice G. Walton

Research shows that if you pay with cash instead of credit, you'll be less likely to buy junk food Read more >


Vitamin B12 Linked to Reduced Risk of Alzheimer's Disease
Alice G. Walton

Higher B12 levels are linked to reduced risk of cognitive decline, including Alzheimer's disease. Read more >


A Hard-Knock Life May Do You Good Down the Road
Alice G. Walton

Facing some adversity in your life may help you better cope with stress and be happier later on. Read more >


Been There, Done That, Didn't Happen
Neil Wagner

"Observation inflation" occurs when we think we've done something we haven't. Read more >


B Vitamins Help Reduce Brain Shrinkage in the Elderly
Alice G. Walton

People taking high doses of B vitamins had less brain shrinkage than those who didn't... Read more >


Contagious Yawning Teaches Researchers About Social Development
Alice G. Walton

Contagious yawning is familiar to most. But did you know it is a form of normal social bonding... Read more >


Marijuana: Last Resort for Neuropathic Pain?
Neil Wagner

People with chronic nerve pain found some relief by smoking marijuana in a Canadian study... Read more >


Early-Onset Parkinson's Disease
Roy N. Alcalay, M.D., M.Sc. and Karen Marder, M.D., M.P.H.

Early-Onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD) can be difficult to diagnose. Genes play a role. Read more >


Luckily, Cancer Risk Does Not Depend on Personality, Researchers Find
Alice G. Walton

The idea that one's personality can contribute to cancer has not been found to be true. Read more >


Worrying About Falling May Make It Happen - So Relax!
Alice G. Walton

Seniors who worry about falling actually fall more than those who don't. Read more >


The Other Brain: From Dementia to Schizophrenia, How New Discoveries About the Brain Are Revolutionizing Medicine and Science
R. Douglas Fields, Ph.D.



Reduce Your Anger, Reduce Your Heart Risk
Alice G. Walton

Relax. Being angry may cause your arteries to thicken and increase your risk for heart attack and stroke. Read more >


Irritable Bowel Syndrome Affects the Brain and Gut Alike
Alice G. Walton

Researchers find that Irritable Bowel Syndrome is linked to changes in the brain as well as the gut. Read more >


People's Brains "Coupled" to Each Other in Good Conversation
Alice G. Walton

The better we understand another, the closer our brain patterns resemble theirs, neutral coupling... Read more >


Being More Connected to Those Around You May Lengthen Your Life
Alice G. Walton

Having a strong social support system rivals quitting smoking in terms of the years it can add to our lives. Read more >


A Sniff of Insulin May Help Alzheimer's Patients
Alice G. Walton

Not just for diabetics: A sniff of the hormone insulin may help recover memory in Alzheimer's... Read more >


Don't Throw Out the Rabbit's Foot: Good Luck Charms May Just Work
Alice G. Walton

Have a good luck charm? It may actually help performance by boosting confidence Read more >


Food for Thought: Pesticide Exposure and ADHD Risk in Children
Esther Entin, M.D.

Pesticide exposure may play a role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Read more >


Does Mozart Really Make Your Kid Smarter? New Study Says "Nein."
Alice G. Walton

There’s little evidence that exposing your child to Mozart will actually improve their IQ. Read more >


The Mere Sight of Illness Boosts the Immune System
Neil Wagner

Just seeing people who show symptoms of illness seems to stimulate the immune system. Read more >


Nerve Block May Help Treat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Alice G. Walton

A promising experimental treatment for intractable PTSD involves anesthetizing the nerves of the stellate ganglion. Read more >


To Boost Your Self-Esteem and Mood, Exercise in the Green, Researchers Say
Alice G. Walton

If you are feeling a little down, head outdoors. Just five minutes outside boosts mood and self-esteem. Read more >


Dancing Improves Seniors' Balance, Reduces Falls
Neil Wagner

Dancing can improve seniors' balance, walking speed and overall functioning, not to mention their spirits. Read more >


Side Effects of Antidepressants More Common Than Previously Thought
Neil Wagner

Antidepressant medications have many side effects. Too often these go unreported by doctors and patients. Read more >


Do Brain Games Make You Smarter?
Alice G. Walton

Playing computer games may improve the specific mental skills the game calls for, but doesn't seem to improve mental capacity. Read more >


The Female Reproductive Cycle...Explained
Alice G. Walton

The hormonal changes surrounding ovulation are often intense. Read more >


Exercise as Mental Health Treatment
Neil Wagner

Exercise is a useful component of any mental health treatment plan. Read more >


Packing up Your Troubles Really Works
Neil Wagner

Sealing up a reminder of an unpleasant experience and throwing it or putting it away may help you move on. Read more >


Stressed Out, Part II: Managing Stress
Alice G. Walton

Stress is a fact of life, but you can learn to manage it better, both mentally and physically. Read more >


Mild Depression Should Not be Left Untreated, Researchers Say
Alice G. Walton

People who believe they may be depressed should not ignore the symptoms. Untreated symptoms raise the odds of full-blown depression. Read more >


Fish Oil May Help Prevent Psychosis
Neil Wagner

Study finds omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil may help prevent youth psychosis. Read more >


SIDS and Serotonin: Is There a Connection?
Esther Entin, M.D.

The cause of sudden infant death syndrome or SIDS is not yet known, but low levels of serotonin may play a role. Read more >


Taking a Break May Help You Remember What You Just Learned
Neil Wagner

Taking a break after absorbing new information may help you retain it better by making it easier to move into long-term memory. Read more >


Antipsychotic Users Not Being Tested for Side Effects
Neil Wagner

Second generation antipsychotic drugs, like clozapine, olanzapine, and risperidone, can raise the risk of diabetes and heart problems. Read more >


Controlling Depression Helps Reduce Blood Sugar in Diabetics
Alice G. Walton

When diabetics suffer from depression, treating it can lower blood sugar and blood pressure levels as well. Read more >


Better Relationships Cut Teenage Weight Gain
Neil Wagner

Negative emotions can contribute to overeating or binge eating. Therapy aimed at improving social skills can therefore help prevent weight Read more >


England Gets Serious about Penalty Kicks
Neil Wagner

England has lost three World Cups on penalty kicks, so researchers came up with a new strategy. Read more >


Diet, Cognitive Ability, and Heart Health Interlinked in Seniors, Study Finds
Alice G. Walton

Eating more fresh fruits and vegetables helps seniors' hearts and their cognitive function. Read more >


A Reminder for New Year's Eve: Coffee Does Not Sober You Up
Neil Wagner

Coffee does not sober you up. In fact, it may impair judgment further. Read more >


Therapy Brings More Happiness than Money, Study Finds
Alice G. Walton

Therapy is a more cost−effective way of finding happiness than is money. Read more >


Adolescent Behavior: Expectations vs. Reality
Esther Entin, M.D.

When teenagers feel alienated from their families, they are at greater risk for sadness and depression. Read more >


Decision-Making Suffers in the Sleep-Deprived, Study Finds
Alice G. Walton

People who are sleep-deprived cannot make quick, "gut" decisions. For first-responders like police officers, this can be dangerous. Read more >


Telephone Intervention Helps Post-Surgery Heart Patients
Alice G. Walton

Phone contact with a nurse practitioner can help reduce depression and the likelihood of re−hospitalization in heart surgery patients. Read more >


Yo-Yo Dieting May Work Like Addiction in the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Yo-yo dieting may generate a withdrawal effect in the brain, increasing the likelihood of a relapse. Read more >


Newly Retired Feel Younger and Healthier
Alice G. Walton

Retirement is good for your health. In fact, if your work life has been stressful, you are likely to feel much better after you retire. According to one study, it's like turning the clock back eight years Read more >


When It Comes to Learning New Skills, A Little Stress Is Worth It
Alice G. Walton

As stressful as learning a new skill can be, the happiness we gain from our new level of competence more than makes up for it. Read more >


Researchers Find No Connection between Coffee and Cognition
Alice G. Walton

Drinking coffee offers no defense against the natural decline of mental abilities as we age. But several other factors seem to be good predictors... Read more >


Alcoholism, Depression, and Obesity Create Vicious Triangle in Women
Alice G. Walton

Women who obsessively replay negative events in their mind are more at risk for alcoholism, depression and obesity. Read more >


Found: A New Piece in the Alzheimer's Puzzle
Alice G. Walton

In what may be a crucial finding for the treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease, a tiny portion of a protein, called N60, appears to be... Read more >


Memory Problems? Bad Habits May Be to Blame
Alice G. Walton

There is a strong connection between bodily health and brain health. Read more >


Multitaskers Strike Out at Mental Abilities
Neil Wagner

People who multitask – doing several things at once – tend to have trouble filtering out distractions. Read more >


Little Boy Blue: Depression in Toddlers
Esther Entin, M.D.

What does a depressed toddler look like? He may be unable to enjoy things that used to be fun or not thinking as clearly as she used to. Read more >


As the Waist Grows Larger, The Brain Gets Smaller
Neil Wagner

Obese and overweight people have less brain tissue than do those who are normal weight. Read more >


Stress Rewires the Brain, Unstressed Times Bring Relief
Alice G. Walton

Stress appears to rewire the brain, making it respond in an obsessive, repetitive rather than creative fashion. The good news is... Read more >


Antidepressant Nation: A Good Thing?
Neil Wagner

Antidepressant use has doubled over the last decade according to a recent study. Is this a good thing or a sign that the drugs are being. Read more >


Optimism is Linked to Less Heart Trouble, Better Life Expectancy
Alice G. Walton

Studies show that cynical and hostile people have a higher mortality rate than those who are optimistic and trusting. Read more >


Minding Your Weight with Yoga
Neil Wagner

Being mindful of what you eat can help you shed pounds. Read more >


“Silent” Strokes May Put Seniors at Risk for Memory Loss and Cognitive Problems
Alice G. Walton

People over 60 may be at risk of experiencing "silent" strokes, those which go unnoticed... Read more >


Did I Take That Pill?
Neil Wagner

Older adults are more likely to incorrectly repeat a task once it has become habitual, like taking daily medication. Read more >


For Veterans, the War Lingers
Neil Wagner

It is no surprise: there is an epidemic of mental disorders among veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. A lack of social support... Read more >


Effective Schizophrenia Drug Under-Prescribed?
Neil Wagner

Clozapine, a highly effective anti-psychotic, is rarely prescribed because of its dangerous side-effects. But a new study finds...More Read more >


These Are The Good Times
Alice G. Walton

Appreciating even the smallest positive moments in your life builds emotional strength, and wards off stress and depression. Read more >


Anxious People Need to Work Harder to Keep Up
Alice G. Walton

People who are anxious may have a hard time ignoring distractions. Read more >


If You Have a Problem, Sleep on It
Alice G. Walton

If you have a problem that needs some creative problem solving, a good solid nap can be very helpful. Read more >


Women's Slight Cognitive Decline Early in Menopause Rebounds
Alice G. Walton

Cognitive functions do indeed seem to suffer slightly in early menopause. But these functions rebound when menopause is fully underway. Read more >


Exercise as Mood Enhancer
Neil Wagner

People feel good after exercising and this feeling can last up to 12 hours. Read more >


Happiness Doesn't Come from Material, "American Dream"-Type Goals, New Study Finds
Alice G. Walton

Being beautiful, rich, and famous doesn't actually equate with being happy. More important are personal growth and social relationships. Read more >


Turn off the TV and Talk to Your Baby
Esther Entin, M.D.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children do not watch TV or videos before age two years. Read more >


Brain Stimulation Helps Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Alice G. Walton

Early studies suggest that cortical brain stimulation may offer hope for people suffering from long-term depression. Read more >


Improving Children's Mental Health: An Updated Agenda and a Roadmap
Esther Entin, M.D.

Resilience, the ability to thrive in the face of extreme adversity, is a reason why some children develop successfully while others fail. Read more >


Books, Games, and Computers — but Not TV — Help Ward off Memory Loss
Alice G. Walton

Staying mentally active by reading or playing games (turn off the TV) are excellent ways to keep the brain "fit." Read more >


Meditation, Anxiety, and ADHD
Esther Entin, M.D.

People with ADHD have a hard time filtering out stimuli present in the environment and deciding which deserve their attention. Read more >


Brain Cell Starvation May Trigger Alzheimer's Disease
Neil Wagner

Alzheimer's disease may be a result of energy deprivation in the brain brought about by poor circulation causing insufficient glucose. Read more >


Bad Managers Raise Risk of Heart Disease
Neil Wagner

Stress at work from a bad boss can increase your risk of heart disease. Read more >


Sleep on It: Napping Helps Form Complex Memory
Alice G. Walton

Short naps have the power to help form a complex form of memory known as relational memory. Read more >


Take 12 Bars and Call me in the Morning: Music, Mood and Illness
Neil Wagner

Listening to music you like (it does not matter what kind) can lower anxiety, reduce pain and improve mood. Read more >


Cocoa's Memory-Enhancing Potential
Lindsey Harle, M.D

Eating more chocolate increases blood flow to the brain, and may improve memory... Read more >


Optimism Pays Off for Heart Patients
Neil Wagner

Having a positive outlook can improve a heart patient's outcome. Read more >


Meditation Can Reduce Reliance on Hypertension Medication
Leslie Carr

Simple relaxation and stress management techniques may make it possible for elderly people with a form of high blood pressure reduce their reliance on antihypertensive drugs, which pose certain risks for this age group. Read more >


Music Soothes the Stroke-Injured Brain
Tom Gilbert

According to fairy tales, music has the power to tame savage beasts. Read more >


Schizophrenia and Stress
Cheryl Corcoran, M.D., and Dolores Malaspina, M.D., M.S.P.H.



A Stimulating Experience
Tom Gilbert

Once used to treat Parkinson's and other movement disorders, deep brain stimulation surgery, or DBS, may have the potential to treat a wide variety of other conditions. Read more >


Days Off
Tom Gilbert

According to a new study, American workers took over a billion days off for mental health reasons. Read more >


The Children of 9/11
Tom Gilbert

Nearly 73 percent of children who lost a parent in the Sept. 11, 2001, World Trade Center catastrophe developed a psychiatric illness in the years following the event. Read more >


Dealing with Chronic Pain: The Mind Body Solution
Hilary Tindle, M.D., M.P.H.



An "Old" New Treatment for Seizures
Tom Gilbert

Although it has been used for other purposes for decades, a sugar substitute may turn out to be a potential cure for epilepsy. Read more >


Suicide Assessment, Intervention and Prevention
Morton M. Silverman, M.D.



A Fate Worse than Debt: Credit Cards and Stress
Tom Gilbert

Most Americans know from personal experience that high credit card debt is bad for their financial health. Read more >


The Neurobiology of Depression
Juan F. Lopez, M.D.



The Response to Stress
Bruce McEwen, Ph.D., and Dean Krahn, M.D

What do we mean when we say we are "stressed out"? We may just be having a bad day, or feeling pressured by too many things to do and too little time to do them. Read more >


Rewards and Addictions
Dean D. Krahn, M.D.

Drug abusers, alcoholics and overeaters may appear to be out of control but, actually, it's the opposite. Their brain chemistry, thrown out of balanceby substance abuse, is strongly dictating their behavior. Read more >


What We Know about Unhealthy Behaviors and How You Can Change Them
Dean D. Krahn, M.D.

We pride ourselves on our intelligence but we still engage in many unhealthy behaviors — eating and drinking to excess, smoking, abusing drugs. Read more >





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