December 11, 2017
   
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Another Way to Support Mental Health
Charlotte LoBuono

Apps can help people with mental health problems get the support they need. Read more >


Tantrums: Have a Plan
Alice G. Walton

Meltdowns are hard to bear. Have a game plan for keeping it together to help your child and keep you sane. Read more >


Paint It Blue
Neil Wagner

People under stress calm down over three times faster when they are exposed to this type of light. Read more >


Good to Forget
Alice G. Walton

Being able to suppress unwanted thoughts helps us cope with stress. Now we know more about how the brain makes this happen. Read more >


Surveillance Via Cell Phone
Neil Wagner

Targeted advertising can be used to turn phone apps into tracking devices. Read more >


Urban Gray Matter Needs Trees
Leslie Carr

Noise, crowding and pollution all stress city dwellers' brains. But when there's a forest or park nearby, things change. Read more >


Heartburn Meds May Trigger Liver Disease
Alice G. Walton

Common proton pump inhibitors like Nexium or Prilosec can harm gut bacteria and increase the risk of liver disease. Read more >


Paranoid Insomniacs
Esther Entin, M.D.

Lack of sleep can leave you vulnerable to depression, paranoia and hallucinations. Online treatment seems to help. Read more >


Being a Couch Potato Can Make You Sad
Alice G. Walton

People who exercise one to two hours a week have a much lower risk for depression than those who are sedentary. Read more >


Relieve Your Worried Brain
Leslie Carr

People who are prone to worry waste a lot of mental energy. Here's a way to reboot your brain. Read more >


You Are Not Alone in Feeling Alone
Charlotte LoBuono

Every year new students and new hires at various companies have to contend with the feeling that everyone knows each other -- except them. Read more >


Good Friends Are Good For You
Alice G. Walton

Close friends are good for your long-term health. The opposite is also true. Read more >


Nature Behind Bars
Alice G. Walton

Good things happen when prisoners are given a chance to spend time immersed (virtually) in nature. Read more >


Depressed New Moms
Esther Entin, M.D.

Many new mothers experience some form of postpartum mood disorder. Yet few seek help. Read more >


What Keeps Parents Up at Night
Esther Entin, M.D.

A national poll identifies 10 of the biggest fears parents have when it comes to their children's health and safety. Read more >


Self Control Is Easier in the Third Person
Leslie Carr

There's a way to get your emotions under control that won't exhaust your willpower. Read more >


Time and Happiness
Alice G. Walton

Using your money to buy services that free up your time isn't lazy -- it's wise. Read more >


The Road to Menopause
Esther Entin, M.D.

Every woman alive goes through the transition to menopause. It can take years. Hot flashes are just one of the many unpleasant symptoms. Read more >


Can Parents Be Too Supportive?
Alice G. Walton

Parents can be too supportive, at least in a study of third graders. But the issue may be trickier than that. Read more >


Blood Pressure Control
Aditya Khetan MBBS, Richard A Josephson MS MD, and Sri Krishna Madan Mohan MBBS, MRCP, FACC

Keeping hypertension under control protects your health. So why do so many fail to do it? Part 2. Read more >


A Novel Way to De-Clutter
Neil Wagner

Are you holding on to too much stuff? Here's a way to honor sentimental items of clothing or toys without succumbing to clutter. Read more >


Anxiety and Volatility in Relationships
Charlotte LoBuono

If one member of a couple worries too much about the attachment of his or her partner, it can cause problems. Read more >


Batter Up Too Late?
Neil Wagner

Baseball players' reaction times improved when they got an extra hour of sleep. Stress and fatigue went down, too. Read more >


Pups Help Kids Cope
Neil Wagner

The challenges of school and growing up are much easier to handle with a dog by your side. Read more >


Noise in Nature
Neil Wagner

Noise is increasingly polluting the peace and quiet of protected areas, disturbing plant and animal life. Read more >


The Problem with Comfort Food
Esther Entin, M.D.

Using food to soothe kids is likely to lead to emotional eating and weight gain. Read more >


Why Kids Drop Out
Neil Wagner

Life crises contribute to many kids' decision to leave school. A little help navigating these rough times could prevent it. Read more >


Two Ways to Crank Up Your Memory
Alice G. Walton

Meditation and music both appear to help preserve memory in the aging brain. Read more >


Four Reasons to Join a Gym
Neil Wagner

If you are struggling with weight loss or fitness goals, check out the nearest gym. It could make all the difference. Read more >


A Cure for Fake News
Neil Wagner

You can inoculate yourself against fake news. It starts with knowing that it's out there. Read more >


Alcohol’s Effects on Memory
Alice G. Walton

Alcohol may make you unable to forget. And this matters for people with PTSD. Read more >


Calm and Happy? There's an App for That
Neil Wagner

Clinicians have designed a set of apps to reduce depression and anxiety. They seem to help. Read more >


Why We Need More Fun at Work
Charlotte LoBuono

Managers who encourage policies that get workers to know each other have employees who learn more and faster on the job. Read more >


Have A Bad Boss?
Neil Wagner

There are basically two types of bad bosses — those who are dysfunctional and those who are are much darker. Read more >


Finding More Fun
Neil Wagner

It's more fun doing something on the fly, improvising, than following a master plan. Keep things loose. Read more >


Men and Nuts
Neil Wagner

Why do nuts, and walnuts especially, do so much for men? They can even boost men's moods. Read more >


How Good Is "Good" Cholesterol?
Charlotte LoBuono

High density lipoprotein is not as bad for your heart as LDL cholesterol. But it may not be as good we think. Read more >


The Real Culprit in Celiac?
Charlotte LoBuono

The cause of celiac disease and gluten intolerance may not be gluten after all. Read more >


Want to Curb Kids' Electronic Media Use?
Esther Entin, M.D.

First you need a plan. Setting limits now will pay off. These guidelines will get you on your way. Read more >


Economic Uncertainty and Mental Decline
Charlotte LoBuono

Financial hardship doesn't just affect physical health; cognitive health suffers, too. Read more >


Taking the Guesswork Out of Depression Treatment
Alice G. Walton

Finding the right treatment for depression is not easy. Researchers may have found a way. Read more >


Parenting In The Digital Age
Esther Entin, M.D.

Parents now have to juggle the demands of their children with those of their electronic devices. Read more >


A Double Whammy to the Heart
Esther Entin, M.D.

First heart attacks are most likely to occur when these two triggers occur together. You can bring both under better control. Read more >


Crazy Cats
Neil Wagner

Is your cat driving you crazy? Two veterinarians and an animal behaviorist have a suggestion that should help. Read more >


Fertility Plummets When Women Are Stressed
Alice G. Walton

A 45% reduced conception rate is clear evidence for why women — and men — need to take stress reduction seriously. Read more >


Senior Serenity
Charlotte LoBuono

Most seniors are happier than people in their 20s and 30s, making them an untapped resource for the mental health of young adults. Read more >


Child Abuse Shortens Lives
Esther Entin, M.D.

Women who were abused in childhood don't live as long as those who weren't. Men are less affected. Read more >


Saving Billions, With Trees
Neil Wagner

When California measured the value to citizens of the trees lining its streets, the savings added up. Read more >


The Art of Stress Relief
Alice G. Walton

Making art helps reduce stress — it doesn't matter whether you are good at it or not. Read more >


Emotional Support for Job Seekers
Neil Wagner

Looking for for work is nobody's idea of a good time. But you can prevent yourself from sabotaging your best efforts. Read more >


How Economics Affects Our Ability to Delay Gratification
Leslie Carr

Resisting temptation is not always a good thing, at least not when rewards are scarce. Read more >


Parents' Effects on the Brain
Esther Entin, M.D.

Supportive parenting actually leaves its mark on key areas of kids' brains, making them better able to handle stress and emotion. Read more >


Ease Depression, Help the Heart
Neil Wagner

Depression is not good for your cardiovascular system, but there is a way to erase the risk. Read more >


What Uncertainty Means for Stress
Neil Wagner

Would you rather know definitely that something bad is going to happen, or be unsure of it? Read more >


Is Your Cell Phone Making You Sad?
Alice G. Walton

Worried about how much time you spend on your phone or computer? Here's one way to think about it. Read more >


Enraged Mice
Neil Wagner

New brain research offers more insight into where rage comes from, and how it's kept in check. Read more >


Wired to Create: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Creative Mind
Scott Barry Kaufman and Carolyn Gregoire



Frozen in the Spotlight
Alice G. Walton

Performance anxiety is all-too-familiar to many. Now scientists know why it occurs. Read more >


Don't Worry; Be Unhappy
Neil Wagner

Feeling down won't make you unhealthy. In fact, it is likely the other way around. Read more >


A One-Stop Treatment for Phobia?
Alice G. Walton

Could phobias be treated in as little as one session? Research is starting to say ‘yes.’ Read more >


The High Price of a Toxic Coworker
Alice G. Walton

Domineering, angry workers are not good for a company's bottom line. Read more >


Parents, Dial Down the Pressure
Alice G. Walton

High expectations can be good for kids. But when they are unrealistic, they can backfire. Read more >


A Depression-Diabetes Connection?
Neil Wagner

People who are insulin resistant and depressed may be helped by treatment with the diabetes drug, pioglitazone. Read more >


The Two Faces Of Social Media
Leslie Carr

The time teens spend on Facebook can increase stress. But there's another, beneficial, side to it. Read more >


When Work Worries Follow You Home
Alice G. Walton

Having trouble disconnecting your brain from work? Some simple steps can help. Read more >


Relaxation Puts A Dent In Healthcare Costs
Alice G. Walton

People who meditate or do yoga use far fewer healthcare services than those who don't. Insurers, take note. Read more >


Bullies Can Be Stopped
Esther Entin, M.D.

Anti-bullying laws really can make a difference. Many states are having success. Here's how. Read more >


Compulsive Texting And Academic Achievement
Neil Wagner

Some teens find it difficult to stop texting or ignore texts. Compulsive texting can cause academic problems. Read more >


You Snooze, You Win
Neil Wagner

Lowering blood pressure may be as simple as taking a nap. It's good for your heart, too. Read more >


Kids, School and Headaches
Neil Wagner

Back-to-school brings headaches for many kids. The stress and change of schedule are two reasons. Read more >


Oh No! Where's My Phone?
Neil Wagner

See how you stack up when it comes to the anxiety some feel when they can't find their phones. Read more >


Workaholics, Overtime May Be Killing You
Neil Wagner

Working 10 to 15 hours of overtime each week greatly increases the risk of stroke and heart disease. Read more >


The Dark Side of Perfectionism
Neil Wagner

It's fine to want to do a really good job, but constant perfectionistic worry about being judged can bring burnout. Read more >


Mindfulness Training Eases PTSD
Alice G. Walton

Mindfulness-based stress reduction helped ease veterans’ symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Read more >


What Noise Is Doing to Your Waistline
Neil Wagner

The more noise from trains, planes and automobiles you hear daily, the bigger your waist, and the more belly fat you are likely to have. Read more >


Stress Really Does Take Years Off Your Life
Charlotte LoBuono

Post-traumatic stress doesn't just bring on emotional issues. It accelerates physical aging, too. Read more >


There Must Be a Safer Way to Treat Kids’ Depression
Esther Entin, M.D.

Antidepressants increase the risk of suicide in some kids. Here's why. Read more >


Parenthood Puts An End to Couples' Equal Workloads
Leslie Carr

When a first child arrives, couples' equal workloads go out the window. But it's not all dad's fault. Read more >


The Upside of Stress -- Why Stress is Good for You and How to Get Good at It
Kelly McGonigal, Ph.D.



Under Pressure? Try Self-Affirmation
Annie Sofield Reed, LCSW

When we want to do a good job, self-affirmations are a good way to counteract our worries about not being able to do well enough. Read more >


Taking a Step Back from a Stressor May Be the First Step in Recovering from It
Alice G. Walton

Taking a mental step back from a problem may be just the trick to solving it. Read more >


Start Now: Recovering from Psychological Trauma
J. Douglas Bremner, M.D.

More than half of us will be exposed to some form of a psychological trauma which can lead to PTSD. Read more >


Helping Others Can Ease Social Anxiety
Alice G. Walton

When teens with social anxiety help others, they come to feel more comfortable in their own skin. Read more >


Activating Important Memories May Make Us Forget
Alice G. Walton

The act of committing something to memory may make us unable to recall other events. Read more >


Air Pollution Raises Anxiety Levels
Esther Entin, M.D.

Air pollution puts your emotional health as well as your physical health at risk. Read more >


Why We “Love” Bad News
Alice G. Walton

Newspapers know that bad news draws us in more than good news. But there is a cost. Read more >


Being Lonely is Bad for Your Health
Neil Wagner

Loneliness can be a health hazard, just like being sedentary, or overweight. Read more >


Parents Who Share Too Much
Leslie Carr

When parents share their children's every move on YouTube or Facebook, it can create problems with privacy and identity. Read more >


Bouts of Anger, Stress, Can Bring on A Heart Attack
Alice G. Walton

Anger management may be good heart attack prevention. Read more >


Misleading Numbers on Campus Sexual Assaults
Neil Wagner

Guess what happens to the number of rapes and sexual assaults reported on campuses when legal scrutiny is lifted? Read more >


Art, Nature, and Spirituality Can Help Protect Against Disease
Alice G. Walton

Experiencing a sense of awe may reduce inflammation – and depression. Read more >


The Dangerous Use and Misuse of Alcohol and Alcohol Interactive Drugs
Sami Hocine

People who drink regularly could be at risk of serious alcohol and medication interactions. Read more >


Yoga's Benefits Go Straight to the Heart
Neil Wagner

Yoga doesn't get enough respect as exercise. It's not just for relaxation -- it's good for your heart. Read more >


Childhood Trauma's Lasting Impact
Esther Entin, M.D.

The effects of traumatic events in childhood can last a lifetime. But they don't need to. Read more >


Body Cameras Can Prevent Violence
Neil Wagner

Body cameras cut police violence by over 50% and could perhaps have saved Michael Brown's life. Read more >


New Insights into Why Some People Are Resistant to Stress, Depression
Sami Hocine

Some people are just not affected by stress very much. A new study suggests why and offers hope for new treatments for depression. Read more >


The Science of Choking Under Pressure
Sami Hocine

Performing our best under pressure is not easy, and people have different reasons for choking. Read more >


Researchers Gain Insight into How Stress Debilitates the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Chronic stress can wreak havoc on the mind. Now we understand what it’s doing to the brain. Read more >


Protein Production Put on Hold During Times of Stress
Sami Hocine

The misfolded proteins that accumulate in ALS and Alzheimer's appear to be the result of cells' response to stress. Read more >


Changing A Memory’s Emotional Color and Maybe Its Impact
Sami Hocine

Events connected to strong emotions are colored by those feelings. Scientists are figuring out how to disconnect the two. Read more >


Gas Disconnects Traumatic Memories, Loosens the Grip of PTSD
Alice G. Walton

Xenon gas may be a better PTSD treatment: It helps disconnect traumatic memories from the pain that can go with them. Read more >


Biochemical Keys to Stress and Resilience Are Uncovered
Alice G. Walton

Some people seem resistant to stress, while others are susceptible to it. Researchers are starting to understand why. Read more >


Certain Occupations Make Parenthood Even Harder
Alice G. Walton

Certain jobs make being a parent even more stressful. Read more >


Stress Is a Recipe for Weight Gain
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Stress can add an extra 100 calories day — even if you don't eat more. For those who are depressed, it's even worse news. Read more >


Running, Even for Just Five Minutes a Day, Helps the Heart
Alice G. Walton

Even just five minutes of running each day can boost heart health. Read more >


Details Emerge on The Link Between Stress and Heart Disease
Charlotte LoBuono

Chronic stress — the kind faced by doctors in the ICU — increases white blood cells that can cause life-threatening plaques to form. Read more >


What Stress Does to Your Memory
Sami Hocine

High levels of stress hormones reduce interconnections among cells in the brain, interfering with our ability to remember. Read more >


The Art of Cheering Up Friends
Alice G. Walton

The best way to cheer someone up may depend on how robust or fragile their self esteem is. Read more >


Flour Power May Lower Cholesterol and Fight Metabolic Syndrome
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

When a community substituted a modified form of wheat fiber for the flour in their diets, they saw a big reduction in cholesterol. Read more >


The Stress of Family Conflicts Increases the Risk of Premature Death
Charlotte LoBuono

The stress of conflict in our relationships with family and friends can actually shorten our lives. Pick your battles. Read more >


Stress Can Make A Bad Diet Even Worse for Your Health
Alice G. Walton

When we are stressed, the comfort foods we crave have an even worse impact on our weight and health than usual. Read more >


Fiber Adds Years to Heart Attack Survivors' Lives
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

A cup or two of whole grain pasta may be all it takes to reduce your risk of another heart attack. Read more >


Bullying's Effects Seen in Adulthood
Charlotte LoBuono

We tend to think of bullying as schoolyard behavior, but it can affect victims even as adults. Read more >


The Keys to Life after a Heart Attack: Medication and Lifestyle Changes Part 2
Richard Josephson, M.D., and Sri K. Madan Mohan, M.D.

For many people, having a heart attack is a wake-up call that sets them on a healthier path. Read more >


Physicians Take on Gun Violence
Esther Entin, M.D.

Because of their special understanding of family issues, doctors can play a big role when it comes to preventing gun violence, according to a new ACP policy statement. Read more >


The Keys to Life after a Heart Attack: Medication and Lifestyle Changes Part 1
Richard Josephson, M.D. and Sri K. Madan Mohan, M.D.

More and more people are surviving heart attacks, but follow-up care is crucial. Know your options. Read more >


Let's Talk About It Over Dinner: When Blood Sugar Drops, Anger Levels Rise
Alice G. Walton

Couples get angrier with each other when they are hungry, and they have the voodoo dolls to prove it. Read more >


Stress Makes Allergies Worse
Leslie Carr

Stress appears to make allergies worse. Calming the mind can help. Read more >


Childhood Stress Can Prematurely Age Genes
Alice G. Walton

Stress in childhood can have lasting effects that can be seen in children's genes. Read more >


All Joy And No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood
Jennifer Senior



Violent Video Games and Aggression
Esther Entin, M.D.

Playing violent video games makes kids prone to seeing others as hostile and acting aggressively. Read more >


Stress Can Reduce a Woman's Chances of Becoming Pregnant
Alice G. Walton

Stress can greatly reduce a woman’s odds of becoming pregnant. Read more >


New Hints at The Brain Chemistry Behind Anxiety
Michael J. Gertner

The brain chemistry of people with anxiety may make it more difficult for them to turn off activity. Luckily, there appears to be a way to change this. Read more >


Massage a Viable Treatment for Chronic Neck Pain
Alice G. Walton

Massage can be an effective treatment for chronic neck pain, but you should be treated several times a week for several weeks. Read more >


More Evidence for Bullying's Emotional Toll
Esther Entin, M.D.

Bullying casts a long shadow. There are things parents can do to reduce the emotional, physical, and psychological damage. Read more >


Quitting Smoking Can Significantly Improve Mental Health
Alice G. Walton

People who smoke usually feel it helps them cope with stress and anxiety, but that's not true. It actually causes those feelings. Read more >


Chronic Stress Disrupts Balance Between White and Gray Matter in the Brain
Michael J. Gertner

Chronic stress appears to alter the balance of white to gray brain matter. This may explain several mental disorders. Read more >


New Routes to Easing Chronic Pain
Michael J. Gertner

Two studies shed light on the brain signals behind chronic pain and suggest new approaches to overriding them. Read more >


To Ease Babies' Colic — Probiotics
Alice G. Walton

Probiotics can help reduce infants' colic, easing babies' discomfort and parents' stress. Read more >


Yoga's Benefits for Cancer Survivors
Alice G. Walton

Yoga can increase cancer survivors' energy, reduce fatigue, and lower inflammation at the cellular level. Read more >


A Different Approach to Self-Control
Neil Wagner

Our willpower can fail us when we are tired or stressed. But how we view the problem could be the problem. Read more >


Meditation May Help Relieve Anxiety, Depression, and Pain
Charlotte LoBuono

Don't Medicate, Meditate Read more >


New Blood Pressure Recommendations May Mean You Don't Need Meds After All
Alice G. Walton

If you have borderline high BP, around 140/90 mm Hg, it may be better to hold off on treatment depending on your age and other factors. Read more >


Fewer Psychiatrists Accept Health Insurance
Neil Wagner

Obamacare promotes greater access to mental health services but few psychiatrists accept insurance. Read more >


Physical Brain Injuries Increase Likelihood of PTSD
Neil Wagner

Physical injury to the the brain also raises the risk of post-traumatic stress. Read more >


Santa Claus, Aging Successfully
Neil Wagner

How healthy is Santa Claus? He surely has some belly fat. But he's actually in pretty good shape. Read more >


Media Coverage of Traumatic Events and Acute Stress
Alice G. Walton

It's OK to be informed, but binge-watching the news when disaster strikes can cause traumatic stress. Read more >


Sacrosine Shows Promise As a New Way to Relieve Depression
Neil Wagner

Sarcosine, found in muscles and other body tissues, improved mood better than a popular antidepressant. Read more >


The Myth of “Healthy Obesity”
Charlotte LoBuono

It's all bad news: you can't be overweight and healthy. Period. Read more >


A Short Course in Eating Better
Alice G. Walton

It takes surprisingly little to help people shop smarter and eat better. Time for a tune up. Read more >


Monkey Mind, A Memoir of Anxiety
Daniel Smith



A Promising New Route to Treating Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Alice G. Walton

The “hunger hormone” ghrelin may help short-circuit PTSD. A vaccine may be possible. Read more >


How Well You Cope with Rejection May Be Up to Your Brain
Neil Wagner

Painful feelings of rejection actually are rooted in the brain, and may be cured there. Read more >


A Parental Wake-Up Call: Yelling Doesn't Help
Esther Entin, M.D.

No parent starts out wanting to yell at his or her child. But somewhere along the line, usually in adolescence, most of us do. Read more >


Social Media Like Twitter, Facebook Can Help Smokers Quit
Alice G. Walton

Social media sites can offer people trying to quit smoking the community and support they need to succeed. Read more >


Lifestyle Changes Reverse Aging in Chromosomes
Michael J. Gertner

When we eat right, exercise and receive emotional support, even our chromosomes look younger. Read more >


The World Happiness Report: People Do Not Live by GDP Alone
Neil Wagner

The World Happiness Report may surprise those who think all they need is a palm tree by the sea. Read more >


Poverty's Mental Toll
Leslie Carr

Being poor robs you of mental bandwidth. The toll money worries take is roughly equal to losing 13 points off your IQ score. Read more >


Shining A Light to Turn Off Anxiety
Neil Wagner

When MIT researchers flipped the switch connecting two brain regions, anxiety vanished. Read more >


Treating Post-Traumatic Stress and Alcoholism Simultaneously
Michael J. Gertner

Post-traumatic stress and alcoholism often go hand-in-hand. Treatments coincide, too. Read more >


Scientists Succeed in Creating a False Memory
Michael J. Gertner

It's not quite "Inception," but scientists have invaded the brains of mice and made fake memories. Read more >


Letting Hospital Patients Sleep
Neil Wagner

Is waking patients during the night to take vital signs more important than letting them sleep? Read more >


When It Comes to Resolving Conflicts in Relationships, One Size Does Not Fit All
Neil Wagner

When couples fight, issues of disrespect or neglect may underlie the conflict. Read more >


Eczema May Make Infants Vulnerable to Food Allergies
Charlotte LoBuono

Irritated, inflamed skin may set the autoimmune response leading to food allergies in motion. Read more >


Antibiotics Harm Bacteria...and The Machinery of Our Cells
Alice G. Walton

Antibiotics can kill bacteria, but they also cause serious stress to our own cells. Read more >


How You Think About Stress Can Affect Your Heart
Neil Wagner

Not everyone feels their health is threatened by stress, but if you do, it's bad news for your heart Read more >


Self-Help That Works
John C. Norcross, PhD, Linda F. Campbell, PhD, John M. Grobal, PsyD, John W. Santrock, PhD, Florin Selagea, MS and Robert Sommer



Too Much Time on Your Hands? Volunteering Reduces Hypertension Risk
Charlotte LoBuono

Volunteering is not just good for the soul. It's good for your blood pressure. Read more >


Veterans with Multiple Brain Injuries Are at Greater Risk of Suicide
Alice G. Walton

Veterans who sustain more than one head trauma are at much greater risk of suicide. Read more >


The Power of Good Habits
Alice G. Walton

We all fall back on our habits; the trick is to make them healthy. Read more >


Heart Problems That Create More Heart Problems
Neil Wagner

Having a heart condition is stressful and can make heart problems worse. It looks like some antidepressants can help. Read more >


Re-Tuning the Brain: Ultrasound's Effect on Mood
Neil Wagner

You can't feel or hear it, but ultrasound improved patients' pain and mood. Read more >


The Genes Behind Circadian Patterns and Major Depression
Michael J. Gertner

If the genes behind our body's clock fall out of sync, depression can be the result. Read more >


In Relationships, Sacrifices Can Backfire
Neil Wagner

Doing something nice for your partner is usually good for the relationship. But not always. When to watch out. Read more >


Our Fear of Missing Out
Neil Wagner

The fear of missing out — we all suffer from it at times, but social media is making it worse. Read more >


Affirming Our Priorities Helps Offset the Mental Effects of Stress
Alice G. Walton

Self-affirmations can help you through periods of chronic stress. Read more >


Deep Relaxation Brings Immediate Genetic Changes
Leslie Carr

Meditation, yoga, and other practices that bring deep relaxation can actually alter your genes. Read more >


There's Earning, and Then There's Overearning
Alice G. Walton

Having more than we can possibly use can put dent in happiness. Read more >


Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: Definitions, Symptoms, and Treatment
Joel Schilling, M.D., Ph.D.

Heart failure is one of the most common and life-threatening conditions in the U.S. What to do when things go from bad to worse. Read more >


It's Healthier To Give than To Receive
Neil Wagner

Helping others isn't just a good thing to do. It's one of the best de-stressors there is. Read more >


The Myth of Multitasking
Charlotte LoBuono

To the guy checking his mail as he talks on the phone: you aren't efficient; you're distracted. Read more >


Yoga May Help Mental Health Disorders, from Depression to Schizophrenia
Alice G. Walton

Yoga can help ease certain mental health disorders. Read more >


Resource Center: Stress



Resource Center: Emotional Health



Health Tips to Carry Forward into 2013
Leslie Carr

New years are for fresh starts and self improvement. Here are some findings to take with you into 2013. Read more >


Nature Ignites a Creative Spark
Charlotte LoBuono

Spending time in nature spurs creativity. Read more >


Aromatherapy Can Lower Heart Rate, Blood Pressure
Neil Wagner

Exposure to certain scents can lower heart rate and BP. Just don't inhale them for too long. Read more >


Taking Early Control of Traumatic Memories May Help Treat PTSD
Alice G. Walton

A new treatment for PTSD helps prevent memory from running amok. Read more >


Meditation: Changing the Mind for the Better
Neil Wagner

Meditation changes the brain differently, depending on the type of meditation you practice. Read more >


Cyberbullying in Offices is More Common Than You Might Think
Alice G. Walton

Bullying doesn't just happen at school. Cyberbullying at work can affect your mental health. Read more >


Why Teenage Fear Lingers
Neil Wagner

Problems with anxiety often show up in adolescence. A study shows why, and why it's hard for teens.. Read more >


Are You Teflon or Velcro When It Comes to Stress?
Leslie Carr

Some people find it pretty easy to shed a stressful day, but for others, it lingers... Read more >


Learning to Identify Negative Emotions May Be Important in Battling Depression
Alice G. Walton

Learning to identify your emotions may help with depression. It's not as easy as it sounds. Read more >


An Experimental Drug May Address the Cognitive Problems of PTSD
Alice G. Walton

Post-traumatic stress disorder is more than anxiety. A new drug may help the cognitive problems... Read more >


A Gene May Help Explain Happiness in Women, Not Men
Alice G. Walton

A gene previously dubbed the "warrior gene" because of its links to aggression may also be linked... Read more >


The Complicated Relationship between Alcohol and Anxiety
Alice G. Walton

Alcohol addiction may rewire the brain so that it can't rebound from stress. PTSD suffers may want.. Read more >


A Brain Chemical That Makes Bad Memories Disappear
Alice G. Walton

Researchers discover why anxiety can persist for months or years after a stressful event. It's all about a brain chemical. Read more >


Feeling Respected is a Key to Well-Being
Leslie Carr

When it comes to what makes you happy, feeling respected and admired is better than money... Read more >


Exposure to Stress in Childhood Appears to Age Cells Prematurely
Esther Entin, M.D.

Stress, particularly violence, appears to prematurely age children at a cellular level, leaving... Read more >


The Mainstreaming of Alternative Medicine: Does the Research Support the Movement? Part 2: Meditation
Alice G. Walton

Meditation increases the size of brain areas associated with memory and reduces our vulnerability to stress. Read more >


The Biology of Kindness and Well-Being
Neil Wagner

Everyday experiences change the brain. Researchers consider the effects of well being and kindness.. Read more >


Social Jet Lag May Be Why You're Fatigued (And Fat)
Alice G. Walton

Our daily schedules are out of sync with our internal clocks. It started with the light bulb... Read more >


Longer Commutes, Poorer Health
Neil Wagner

Longer commutes are associated with poorer health. Prolonged sitting is partly to blame, but traffic also takes a toll. Read more >


The Happiness Dilemma
Alice G. Walton

The pursuit of happiness is not as simple as we might think. What you focus on can make a big difference to your health. Read more >


A Snapshot of Stress Across the Generations
Alice G. Walton

The Millennial generation is more stressed than generations before. They are also less able to cope. Read more >


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Certain brain centers are less active in chronic fatigue syndrome patients, suggesting a new... Read more >


Blood Test Can Reliably Diagnose Teen Depression
Michael J. Gertner

Markers found in a simple blood test reliably distinguished depressed teens from those who weren't.. Read more >


Death and Taxes: Road Fatalities Rise on Tax Day
Neil Wagner

The stress of doing taxes can distract us on the road. Traffic fatalities rise every tax day... Read more >


Dogs In the Workplace Can Reduce Stress
Leslie Carr

Taking your pup to work can reduce stress and may increase workers' productivity... Read more >


The Stress-Immunity Connection
Alice G. Walton

Stress can lead to reduced immune system function. Reduce stress, reduce your odds for illness. Read more >


Endorphins May Explain Why Alcohol Makes Us Feel Happy
Alice G. Walton

Alcohol works by releasing "feel good" chemicals, endorphins, in the brain, which could explain its addictiveness. Read more >


One in Five Americans Suffers from Mental Health Problems
Alice G. Walton

One in five Americans suffers from mental health problems. There is no reason to feel uncomfortable about seeking help. Read more >


The Impact of Bad Bosses
Alice G. Walton

A controlling, coercive boss can take a toll on your well being. But there is more to it than that. Read more >


Consequences of Insomnia Go Beyond Fatigue, Poor Performance
Susan H. Scher, MD

Insomnia is a major health risk. It erodes your quality of life. But too few doctors even ask... Read more >


Oxytocin Could Help Introverts Feel More Outgoing
Alice G. Walton

The mother-baby bonding hormone, oxytocin, made introverts feel more outgoing and trusting. Read more >


Indecision and Lack of Commitment Breed Unhappiness
Neil Wagner

Some people constantly doubt themselves rather than committing to their choices, no matter how small Read more >


Children's Powers of Positive Thinking
Esther Entin, M.D.

At what age do children learn that one can choose to see a situation in a more positive light? Read more >


Uncovering Why Marijuana Has Opposing Effects on the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Smoking pot can make people calm, anxious, or even psychotic. A study reveals the chemical culprit.. Read more >


Adrenal Hormone DHEA For Menopause Symptoms
Alice G. Walton

The hormone DHEA sounds like a miracle: it may ease menopause symptoms and boost sexual interest. Read more >


Important Link in the Stress Response Could Mean Better Treatment
Alice G. Walton

Researchers discover an important step in the stress response, which, if blocked, could stop... Read more >


Children and Family Violence
Esther Entin, M.D.

The brains of children exposed to family violence show changes similar to those of soldiers... Read more >


Bad Bosses Follow You Home
Neil Wagner

Having a difficult, abusive boss can strain personal relationships at home. Read more >


Alcohol: Friend or Foe?
Alice G. Walton

Drinking offers health benefits and risks. Get help sifting through the latest findings. Read more >


Dreams Can Help Heal Mental Wounds
Alice G. Walton

REM sleep can reduce the emotional impact of traumatic memories. Read more >


A Sobering Look at Alcohol
Neil Wagner

Heavy drinking and alcoholism raise a person's risk of cancer and a host of other diseases considerably. Read more >


The Hidden Costs of Not Taking a Sick Day
Leslie Carr

People who decide to come to work when they feel sick spread disease. Read more >


Stressful Life Events Can Up Death Risk: But There's a Limit
Alice G. Walton

Going through a string of difficult life events in middle age raises one's death risk. Read more >


Seasonal Affective Disorder: Coming Out of the Cold
Alice G. Walton

Seasonal affective disorder occurs when a lack of sun disrupts the body's circadian and serotonin cycles. It a real form of depression. Read more >


How We React to Stress Influences Performance
Alice G. Walton

How you interpret your stress can influence how you perform on tests. Read more >


The Cost of the Economy: How to Recover Health and Happiness in the Face of Financial Crisis
Alice G. Walton

What you can do to cope with the stress of financial hardship – emotionally and practically. Read more >


Researchers Unravel How Stress Leads to Depression
Alice G. Walton

Stress can lead to depression, but new brain cells may be responsible for stopping the process... Read more >


A Nagging Problem
Esther Entin, M.D.

Kids' nagging can wear down moms' resistance. But a study found some winning strategies... Read more >


Generalized Anxiety and Interpersonal Relationship Problems Deeply Intertwined
Alice G. Walton

People with anxiety often have problematic social relationships, partly as a result of their worries Read more >


Pets Are Good For Everyone, Not Just "Pet People"
Neil Wagner

Pet owners score higher on a variety of measures of healthy adjustment... Read more >


Massage Beats Conventional Treatments for Lower Back Pain
Neil Wagner

Several types of massage can be helpful in relieving back pain. Read more >


The Invisible Epidemic: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Memory and the Brain
J. Douglas Bremner, M.D.



Stressful Events Lead to Unexpected Reaction in Panic Patients
Alice G. Walton

You might think people with panic disorder would fall apart in a crisis, but that's not the case... Read more >


The Roots of Body Dysmorphic Disorder
Alice G. Walton

People with body dysmorphic disorder have problems in the brain's visual processing system. Read more >


Strong Social Support Systems at Work May Lengthen Life
Alice G. Walton

Getting along well with the coworkers may lengthen your life. Getting along with the boss... not... Read more >


Cooperation and Guilt Linked in the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Do we cooperate with others to experience positive feelings or avoid the bad ones? Read more >


Reducing Stress May Boost Success Rate with IVF
Alice G. Walton

Reducing stress can improve the odds of becoming pregnant through in vitro fertilization. Read more >


Alcoholism May Be Linked to Impulsivity Gene, Brain Differences
Alice G. Walton

People with alcoholism in the family tend to have a genetic variation affecting impulsivity. Environmental factors also play a role. Read more >


Food May Activate Same Addiction Centers in the Brain as Drugs
Alice G. Walton

Food addiction and drug addiction may activate the same reward areas of the brain. Read more >


Long Workdays May Raise Heart Risk
Neil Wagner

Working over 11 hours a day regularly can raise your risk of heart disease significantly. Read more >


Cortisol May Ease Fear of Heights
Neil Wagner

A dose of cortisol, the stress hormone secreted when we are afraid or stressed, helped acrophobics.. Read more >


Food for Thought: What the Ultimate Organ Needs to Stay Healthy
Alice G. Walton

Some foods can help you feel, think and remember better. You may know about blueberries, but curcumin? Read more >


Accidental Discovery Grows Hair in Bald Mice: Are People Next?
Neil Wagner

An accidental discovery has resulted in serious hair re-growth in stressed mice. If men are next... Read more >


"Talk Therapy" May Rewire the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Anxious? Cognitive behavior therapy can help. The changes it brings can be seen in the brain itself. Read more >


Antioxidants May Combat Male Infertility
Neil Wagner

Antioxidants appear to improve male fertility, reducing damaging oxidative stress on sperm... Read more >


Exercise May Be Best Bet for IBS Sufferers
Alice G. Walton

Exercise significantly reduces the severity of IBS symptoms. Read more >


Meditation Changes the Cells of the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Meditation changes the brain, with areas related to learning and memory expanding and areas related to anxiety, contracting. Read more >


How to Beat Test Anxiety
Neil Wagner

Writing about your anxiety may help release some of its grip and enable you to perform more in line with your ability. Read more >


New Research Shows Us Why We Should Listen to the Heart
Alice G. Walton

Do people listen to their bodies have better instincts when it comes to making intuitive decisions? Read more >


New Antibiotics Brings Relief to IBS Sufferers
Alice G. Walton

A new antibiotic may bring significant relief to IBS sufferers; but will it work over the long-term? Read more >


Fibromyalgia: Too Tough for Mindfulness Therapy?
Neil Wagner

Can mindfulness therapy reduce the pain experienced by people with this baffling condition? Read more >


The Happiness of the Unemployed Rises Again
Alice G. Walton

If you've been laid off, take heart: new research shows that within one year, you'll be about as happy as you were before the layoff. Read more >


The Best of 2010: Health Tips to Take With Us Into 2011
Alice G. Walton

Planning for a healthier 2011? We pull together some of the top health news stories of this past year. Read more >


Can Sleep Deprivation Prevent Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder?
Alice G. Walton

Scientists have found a way to disrupt upsetting memories of traumatic events: sleep deprivation. Read more >


Antidepressant Use Climbs as Talk Therapy Rates Drop - But Is Mindfulness the Key?
Alice G. Walton

More people are seeking treatment for depression. But the type of treatment they choose may not be.. Read more >


Increased Risk of Heart Disease Seen in Women with High Job Strain
Neil Wagner

No surprise: women facing job stress have a greatly increased risk of heart disease. But what to do? Read more >


Retirement Reverses Job-Related Fatigue, Depression
Alice G. Walton

Workers with exhaustion and depression felt significantly better after they retired... Read more >


Stress Not So Bad for the Belly
Alice G. Walton

Stress isn't behind as much weight gain as was previously thought, but there are sex differences... Read more >


A Hard-Knock Life May Do You Good Down the Road
Alice G. Walton

Facing some adversity in your life may help you better cope with stress and be happier later on. Read more >


Bad Habits Make Bad Employees, Study Finds
Alice G. Walton

People who smoke, overeat, or don't exercise take more sick days, while those who drink take fewer. Read more >


New Evidence that Stress Kills
Neil Wagner

Look at the hair of cardiac patients and you can see that in the months before the attack... Read more >


Some Blood Pressure Medications May Raise Blood Pressure
Neil Wagner

Renin, an enzyme, may offer a way to figure out which blood pressure meds a patient may best respond Read more >


Luckily, Cancer Risk Does Not Depend on Personality, Researchers Find
Alice G. Walton

The idea that one's personality can contribute to cancer has not been found to be true. Read more >


Irritable Bowel Syndrome Affects the Brain and Gut Alike
Alice G. Walton

Researchers find that Irritable Bowel Syndrome is linked to changes in the brain as well as the gut. Read more >


Putting Meditation to the Test
Alice G. Walton

Science is putting the ancient practice to the test. It appears that being mindful can change your brain and your behavior. Read more >


Don't Throw Out the Rabbit's Foot: Good Luck Charms May Just Work
Alice G. Walton

Have a good luck charm? It may actually help performance by boosting confidence Read more >


Is a Little Stress Good for The Body? New Research Shows It Might Help Fight Cancer
Alice G. Walton

Mice "stressed" by living in stimulating environments fought cancer better than those not stressed. Read more >


Overtime Ups Risk of Death from Heart Disease
Alice G. Walton

People who work a great deal of overtime are at greater risk of heart-related death. Type A behavior may be partly to blame. Read more >


The Mere Sight of Illness Boosts the Immune System
Neil Wagner

Just seeing people who show symptoms of illness seems to stimulate the immune system. Read more >


Nerve Block May Help Treat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Alice G. Walton

A promising experimental treatment for intractable PTSD involves anesthetizing the nerves of the stellate ganglion. Read more >


Dieting Increases Stress Hormone, Makes Weight Loss Harder
Alice G. Walton

Dieting can actually make it harder to shed pounds because it raises levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Read more >


Stressed Out, Part II: Managing Stress
Alice G. Walton

Stress is a fact of life, but you can learn to manage it better, both mentally and physically. Read more >


Stressed Out: The Behavior and Biology of Stress
Alice G. Walton

Stress is a feeling, but it is also a biological response that is both helpful and harmful. Read more >


Children Left On the Home Front When Moms and Dads Go to War
Esther Entin, M.D.

Kids and caregivers left behind during deployment have to shoulder a heavy burden. A study looks at what can help. Read more >


Yoga Begins to Reveal Its Secrets
Neil Wagner

Yoga appears to help the body by reducing its inflammatory response to stress. Read more >


Newly Retired Feel Younger and Healthier
Alice G. Walton

Retirement is good for your health. In fact, if your work life has been stressful, you are likely to feel much better after you retire. According to one study, it's like turning the clock back eight years Read more >


When It Comes to Learning New Skills, A Little Stress Is Worth It
Alice G. Walton

As stressful as learning a new skill can be, the happiness we gain from our new level of competence more than makes up for it. Read more >


Getting Online Support May Help College Kids Tackle Drinking
Alice G. Walton

College students who have harmful drinking patterns can be helped to rein in their drinking by receiving personalized online feedback. Read more >


Stress Rewires the Brain, Unstressed Times Bring Relief
Alice G. Walton

Stress appears to rewire the brain, making it respond in an obsessive, repetitive rather than creative fashion. The good news is... Read more >


These Are The Good Times
Alice G. Walton

Appreciating even the smallest positive moments in your life builds emotional strength, and wards off stress and depression. Read more >


Anxious People Need to Work Harder to Keep Up
Alice G. Walton

People who are anxious may have a hard time ignoring distractions. Read more >


Exercise as Mood Enhancer
Neil Wagner

People feel good after exercising and this feeling can last up to 12 hours. Read more >


Lowering Job Stress May Reduce Risk for Major Depression
Alice G. Walton

Job stress can raise the chances a person will experience major depression. Read more >


Finding Fun Ways to Stay Fit
Jordana Bieze Foster

Think of play (dancing, hiking, tennis) when you think of fitness. It will help keep you motivated. Read more >


Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression
Neil Wagner

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy asks people to observe their thoughts and to focus on the physical sensation of breathing. Read more >


Music May Be Good for the Heart, Literally
Alice G. Walton

Listening to pleasurable music helps dilate blood vessels significantly, just as blood pressure medications like statins do. Read more >


Far Beyond The Three R's
Esther Entin, M.D.

Social skills, such as knowing how to resist peer pressure, endure beyond childhood and support a person's success in adulthood. Read more >


Bad Managers Raise Risk of Heart Disease
Neil Wagner

Stress at work from a bad boss can increase your risk of heart disease. Read more >


Keeping Those Pounds Off
Neil Wagner

When it comes to maintaining weight loss, telephone counseling appears to be just as effective as face-to-face counseling. Read more >


Gulf War Illness, Unraveled
Neil Wagner

Gulf War illness was originally dismissed by many as a psychosomatic illness. Then a cause was found. Read more >


Smokers Quit in Clusters
Alice G. Walton

When people close to you quit smoking, you are more likely to quit as well. Read more >


Migraine
Richard P. Kraig, Ph.D., M.D.



Virtual Reality Therapy as a Treatment for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
Neil Wagner

A new study of has found a surprising use for virtual reality technology — as a therapeutic method for helping people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. Read more >


Schizophrenia and Stress
Cheryl Corcoran, M.D., and Dolores Malaspina, M.D., M.S.P.H.



The Children of 9/11
Tom Gilbert

Nearly 73 percent of children who lost a parent in the Sept. 11, 2001, World Trade Center catastrophe developed a psychiatric illness in the years following the event. Read more >


Suicide Assessment, Intervention and Prevention
Morton M. Silverman, M.D.



Stress and Allergy
Rosalind J. Wright, M.D., M.P.H., and Sheldon Cohen, Ph.D

Have you ever noticed that sometimes when you're having a really tough day, you sneeze a lot and your skin feels itchier? It's not a coincidence, your emotions may have been the trigger. Read more >


Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
Gary M. Gray, M.D.

Tincture of opium may help relieve IBS symptoms when other medicines fail. Read more >


More than a Little Heartburn: Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)
Gary M. Gray, M.D.

To reduce episodes of heartburn, avoid cigarettes,late night meals and alcohol and coffee in the evening. Read more >


Anxiety Disorders
Kathryn J. Zerbe, M.D.

Psychodynamic therapy works best with those who are curious to learn more about themselves and their inner thoughts. Read more >


A Fate Worse than Debt: Credit Cards and Stress
Tom Gilbert

Most Americans know from personal experience that high credit card debt is bad for their financial health. Read more >


Fibromyalgia: Real or Imaginary?
M. Nergis Alnigenis (Yanmaz), M.D., and Peter Barland, M.D.

A low-impact exercise program may help relieve the symptoms of Fibromyalgia Syndrome. Read more >


The Neurobiology of Depression
Juan F. Lopez, M.D.



The Response to Stress
Bruce McEwen, Ph.D., and Dean Krahn, M.D

What do we mean when we say we are "stressed out"? We may just be having a bad day, or feeling pressured by too many things to do and too little time to do them. Read more >


Rewards and Addictions
Dean D. Krahn, M.D.

Drug abusers, alcoholics and overeaters may appear to be out of control but, actually, it's the opposite. Their brain chemistry, thrown out of balanceby substance abuse, is strongly dictating their behavior. Read more >


What We Know about Unhealthy Behaviors and How You Can Change Them
Dean D. Krahn, M.D.

We pride ourselves on our intelligence but we still engage in many unhealthy behaviors — eating and drinking to excess, smoking, abusing drugs. Read more >





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