July 31, 2014
   
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Smoking Increases the Risk of Suicide
Charlotte LoBuono

Smoking doesn't just harm your heart and lungs. It can bring on serious depression, and make suicide more likely. Read more >


Unstructured Time Helps Develop Children's “Executive” Skills
Esther Entin, M.D.

Children learn the “executive” skills that will help them run their lives best when they have unstructured time. Read more >


What Stress Does to Your Memory
Sami Hocine

High levels of stress hormones reduce interconnections among cells in the brain, interfering with our ability to remember. Read more >


The Art of Cheering Up Friends
Alice G. Walton

The best way to cheer someone up may depend on how robust or fragile their self esteem is. Read more >


Perimenopause, Estrogen and Mood
Esther Entin, M.D.

Estrogen levels fluctuate during the changes leading up to menopause, and this destabilizes brain chemicals linked to mood. Read more >


Discrimination and Favoritism May Be The Same Thing
Alice G. Walton

We think of discrimination as being about hate and holding certain people back. But it can be just the opposite. Read more >


Psilocybin Shows Potential As Treatment for Depression
Leslie Carr

Psilocybin, found in certain mushrooms, appears to help prevent depression and anxiety by enhancing mood. Read more >


The Stress of Family Conflicts Increases the Risk of Premature Death
Charlotte LoBuono

The stress of conflict in our relationships with family and friends can actually shorten our lives. Pick your battles. Read more >


Stress Can Make A Bad Diet Even Worse for Your Health
Alice G. Walton

When we are stressed, the comfort foods we crave have an even worse impact on our weight and health than usual. Read more >


Bullying's Effects Seen in Adulthood
Charlotte LoBuono

We tend to think of bullying as schoolyard behavior, but it can affect victims even as adults. Read more >


The Keys to Life after a Heart Attack: Medication and Lifestyle Changes Part 2
Richard Josephson, M.D., and Sri K. Madan Mohan, M.D.

For many people, having a heart attack is a wake-up call that sets them on a healthier path. Read more >


Depressed Brains Boosted to a More Resilient State
Sami Hocine

Mice prone to depression became resistant to stress and depression after a jump-start. Read more >


Physicians Take on Gun Violence
Esther Entin, M.D.

Because of their special understanding of family issues, doctors can play a big role when it comes to preventing gun violence, according to a new ACP policy statement. Read more >


Childhood Stress Can Prematurely Age Genes
Alice G. Walton

Stress in childhood can have lasting effects that can be seen in children's genes. Read more >


Violent Video Games and Aggression
Esther Entin, M.D.

Playing violent video games makes kids prone to seeing others as hostile and acting aggressively. Read more >


Stress Can Reduce a Woman's Chances of Becoming Pregnant
Alice G. Walton

Stress can greatly reduce a woman’s odds of becoming pregnant. Read more >


New Hints at The Brain Chemistry Behind Anxiety
Michael J. Gertner

The brain chemistry of people with anxiety may make it more difficult for them to turn off activity. Luckily, there appears to be a way to change this. Read more >


More Evidence for Bullying's Emotional Toll
Esther Entin, M.D.

Bullying casts a long shadow. There are things parents can do to reduce the emotional, physical, and psychological damage. Read more >


Kids and Caffeine: Less Soda, But New Sources
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

It's hard to believe any parent who cares about their sanity would give their children caffeine. So why is it that even preschoolers tend to get a daily dose? Read more >


Quitting Smoking Can Significantly Improve Mental Health
Alice G. Walton

People who smoke usually feel it helps them cope with stress and anxiety, but that's not true. It actually causes those feelings. Read more >


Chronic Stress Disrupts Balance Between White and Gray Matter in the Brain
Michael J. Gertner

Chronic stress appears to alter the balance of white to gray brain matter. This may explain several mental disorders. Read more >


A New Brain Region Is Implicated in Anxiety
Alice G. Walton

When we are anxious a brain region long-believed to calm responsiveness actually seems to excite it. Read more >


Caffeine's Memory-Boosting Abilities
Charlotte LoBuono

Your morning coffee doesn't just wake you up; it can help you remember things more clearly. Read more >


Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Diagnoses on The Rise
Esther Entin, M.D.

More and more children are being diagnosed and treated for attention deficits. Is this a good thing? Read more >


Fewer Psychiatrists Accept Health Insurance
Neil Wagner

Obamacare promotes greater access to mental health services but few psychiatrists accept insurance. Read more >


Physical Brain Injuries Increase Likelihood of PTSD
Neil Wagner

Physical injury to the the brain also raises the risk of post-traumatic stress. Read more >


Cell Phone Angst
Neil Wagner

We all love our cell phones, but they can increase anxiety and make us miserable. Read more >


Media Coverage of Traumatic Events and Acute Stress
Alice G. Walton

It's OK to be informed, but binge-watching the news when disaster strikes can cause traumatic stress. Read more >


Sacrosine Shows Promise As a New Way to Relieve Depression
Neil Wagner

Sarcosine, found in muscles and other body tissues, improved mood better than a popular antidepressant. Read more >


Psychobiotics, A Possible New Treatment for Depression
Alice G. Walton

We know probiotics are good for GI heath. They may also affect mental health. Read more >


Monkey Mind, A Memoir of Anxiety
Daniel Smith



Making Social Networks Work for Vulnerable Teens
Neil Wagner

The Internet offers troubled kids support and community. It also raises the risk of suicide. Read more >


How Well You Cope with Rejection May Be Up to Your Brain
Neil Wagner

Painful feelings of rejection actually are rooted in the brain, and may be cured there. Read more >


Oxytocin and The Pleasure We Get from Being Social
Alice G. Walton

The hormone oxytocin helps stimulate human connection. It also appears important to experiencing ple Read more >


Lifestyle Changes Reverse Aging in Chromosomes
Michael J. Gertner

When we eat right, exercise and receive emotional support, even our chromosomes look younger. Read more >


The World Happiness Report: People Do Not Live by GDP Alone
Neil Wagner

The World Happiness Report may surprise those who think all they need is a palm tree by the sea. Read more >


Antipsychotic Use in Children
Esther Entin, M.D.

Children taking certain antipsychotics for behavioral problems are far more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Read more >


Memory and Forgetting: It's All about the Networks
Michael J. Gertner

Memory and forgetting go hand-in-hand. Now we know that network coordination is more important than brain activation. Read more >


Shining A Light to Turn Off Anxiety
Neil Wagner

When MIT researchers flipped the switch connecting two brain regions, anxiety vanished. Read more >


The Darker Side of Oxytocin
Neil Wagner

Oxytocin has been called the love hormone. But it's long-term effects are quite different. Read more >


Facebook Use May Reduce Happiness, Not Enhance It
Alice G. Walton

Facebook may actually increase sadness. Be sure to make time to connect for real. Read more >


Preventing Drop-Outs: Keeping Kids Engaged in School
Esther Entin, M.D.

Keeping kids engaged in school is perhaps the most important thing you can do to foster success. Read more >


When Bullying Hits Home: Sibling Rivalry or Dangerous Victimization?
Esther Entin, M.D.

Siblings will fight, but bullying happens at home, too. And the emotional impact is just as serious as when it happens at school. Read more >


Scientists Succeed in Creating a False Memory
Michael J. Gertner

It's not quite "Inception," but scientists have invaded the brains of mice and made fake memories. Read more >


Self-Help That Works
John C. Norcross, PhD, Linda F. Campbell, PhD, John M. Grobal, PsyD, John W. Santrock, PhD, Florin Selagea, MS and Robert Sommer



iPods in the ICU
Neil Wagner

Listening to music — or noise-canceling headphones — can ease patients' anxiety. Read more >


The Genes Behind Circadian Patterns and Major Depression
Michael J. Gertner

If the genes behind our body's clock fall out of sync, depression can be the result. Read more >


Our Fear of Missing Out
Neil Wagner

The fear of missing out — we all suffer from it at times, but social media is making it worse. Read more >


Affirming Our Priorities Helps Offset the Mental Effects of Stress
Alice G. Walton

Self-affirmations can help you through periods of chronic stress. Read more >


There's Earning, and Then There's Overearning
Alice G. Walton

Having more than we can possibly use can put dent in happiness. Read more >


Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: Definitions, Symptoms, and Treatment
Joel Schilling, M.D., Ph.D.

Heart failure is one of the most common and life-threatening conditions in the U.S. What to do when things go from bad to worse. Read more >


Exercise Improves Self Control, Decision-Making
Charlotte LoBuono

Exercise can help us exert more self control. It enhances the brain's ability to solve problems, plan, and make decisions. Read more >


Deep Brain Stimulation Disrupts OCD
Neil Wagner

Obsessions and compulsions are the result of excessive brain activity, not anxiety. DBS can help. Read more >


It's Healthier To Give than To Receive
Neil Wagner

Helping others isn't just a good thing to do. It's one of the best de-stressors there is. Read more >


Helicopter Parents: When Mothering Is Smothering
Neil Wagner

College kids whose parents haven't learned to let go are prone to anxiety and depression. Support autonomy. Read more >


Bullying Leaves Long-Lasting Psychological Effects
Charlotte LoBuono

The effects of bullying can be long-lasting, especially for those who have been both bully and victim. Read more >


Yoga May Help Mental Health Disorders, from Depression to Schizophrenia
Alice G. Walton

Yoga can help ease certain mental health disorders. Read more >


Resource Center: Stress



The School Day Needs More...Recess
Neil Wagner

In Japan, schoolchildren are given a 10-15 minute break every hour. Recess is important to cognitive, physical and social development. Read more >


Resource Center: Emotional Health



Better Language Skills Help Kids Cope with Emotions
Alice G. Walton

Helping kids with language development gives them the tools to express their emotions, rather than act out. Read more >


The Emotional Lives of Parents
Alice G. Walton

Some studies suggest parenting is linked to happiness, while others claim the opposite. A new one gets closer to the truth. Read more >


Nature Ignites a Creative Spark
Charlotte LoBuono

Spending time in nature spurs creativity. Read more >


Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Antidepressant-Resistant Depression
Neil Wagner

Antidepressants don't help everyone. A new study finds that one kind of psychotherapy can improve the odds. Read more >


Aromatherapy Can Lower Heart Rate, Blood Pressure
Neil Wagner

Exposure to certain scents can lower heart rate and BP. Just don't inhale them for too long. Read more >


Taking Early Control of Traumatic Memories May Help Treat PTSD
Alice G. Walton

A new treatment for PTSD helps prevent memory from running amok. Read more >


Meditation: Changing the Mind for the Better
Neil Wagner

Meditation changes the brain differently, depending on the type of meditation you practice. Read more >


Cyberbullying in Offices is More Common Than You Might Think
Alice G. Walton

Bullying doesn't just happen at school. Cyberbullying at work can affect your mental health. Read more >


Why Teenage Fear Lingers
Neil Wagner

Problems with anxiety often show up in adolescence. A study shows why, and why it's hard for teens.. Read more >


Are You Teflon or Velcro When It Comes to Stress?
Leslie Carr

Some people find it pretty easy to shed a stressful day, but for others, it lingers... Read more >


Smoke-Free Laws Lead to Fewer Hospitalizations
Leslie Carr

When cities or states prohibit smoking, the health benefits are immediate, enormous and not restricted to smokers. Read more >


Off-Label Antipsychotic Use Continues to Rise, Especially in Children
Neil Wagner

Off-label prescribing for kids is way up. So are their serious side effects. The search for... Read more >


The Effects of Social Violence in Children's TV Shows
Esther Entin, M.D.

All the gossip, rejection, teasing and excluding that goes on on shows sets the wrong tone. Read more >


Learning to Identify Negative Emotions May Be Important in Battling Depression
Alice G. Walton

Learning to identify your emotions may help with depression. It's not as easy as it sounds. Read more >


An Experimental Drug May Address the Cognitive Problems of PTSD
Alice G. Walton

Post-traumatic stress disorder is more than anxiety. A new drug may help the cognitive problems... Read more >


A Gene May Help Explain Happiness in Women, Not Men
Alice G. Walton

A gene previously dubbed the "warrior gene" because of its links to aggression may also be linked... Read more >


The Complicated Relationship between Alcohol and Anxiety
Alice G. Walton

Alcohol addiction may rewire the brain so that it can't rebound from stress. PTSD suffers may want.. Read more >


Glial Cells
R. Douglas Fields, Ph.D.

Glia were completely overlooked until it was discovered that Einstein's brain was packed with them. Read more >


Dental Filling Material Linked to Behavioral Problems in Children
Esther Entin, M.D.

Fillings with a form of the chemical BPA raise the likelihood that a child will have emotional... Read more >


Closer to a Pill for Long-Term Weight Loss
Leslie Carr

A new drug desensitizes cannabinoid receptors and improves the appetite-reducing action of leptin. Read more >


Alternative Medicine: Does the Research Support the Movement? Part 3: Yoga
Alice G. Walton

Yoga has some proven benefits and unproven claims. What you can, and can't, expect it to do for you. Read more >


A Brain Chemical That Makes Bad Memories Disappear
Alice G. Walton

Researchers discover why anxiety can persist for months or years after a stressful event. It's all about a brain chemical. Read more >


Feeling Respected is a Key to Well-Being
Leslie Carr

When it comes to what makes you happy, feeling respected and admired is better than money... Read more >


The Mainstreaming of Alternative Medicine: Does the Research Support the Movement? Part 2: Meditation
Alice G. Walton

Meditation increases the size of brain areas associated with memory and reduces our vulnerability to stress. Read more >


A Three-Hour Therapy Session Could Treat Arachnophobia
Alice G. Walton

People so afraid of spiders that they wouldn't walk on grass were cured of their phobia with... Read more >


The Biology of Kindness and Well Being
Neil Wagner

Everyday experiences change the brain. Researchers consider the effects of well being and kindness.. Read more >


Social Jet Lag May Be Why You're Fatigued (And Fat)
Alice G. Walton

Our daily schedules are out of sync with our internal clocks. It started with the light bulb... Read more >


The Happiness Dilemma
Alice G. Walton

The pursuit of happiness is not as simple as we might think. What you focus on can make a big difference to your health. Read more >


A Snapshot of Stress Across the Generations
Alice G. Walton

The Millennial generation is more stressed than generations before. They are also less able to cope. Read more >


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Certain brain centers are less active in chronic fatigue syndrome patients, suggesting a new... Read more >


Pediatric Acute Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome, PANS
Esther Entin, M.D.

Infection can sometimes bring on sudden bizarre obsessions and compulsions in children. Knowing the signs can help. Read more >


The Stress-Immunity Connection
Alice G. Walton

Stress can lead to reduced immune system function. Reduce stress, reduce your odds for illness. Read more >


The Power of Good Intentions
Neil Wagner

Food tastes better and pain hurts less when it comes from people with good intentions. Read more >


Endorphins May Explain Why Alcohol Makes Us Feel Happy
Alice G. Walton

Alcohol works by releasing "feel good" chemicals, endorphins, in the brain, which could explain its addictiveness. Read more >


One in Five Americans Suffers from Mental Health Problems
Alice G. Walton

One in five Americans suffers from mental health problems. There is no reason to feel uncomfortable about seeking help. Read more >


Facebook: Not for the Negative
Neil Wagner

People with heartfelt Facebook posts about what's wrong in their world may end up with less traffic. Read more >


For Mood Disorders, Combined Therapy Works Better
Neil Wagner

A study shows how a combination of antidepressants and therapy helps reduce memories' impact... Read more >


The Impact of Bad Bosses
Alice G. Walton

A controlling, coercive boss can take a toll on your well being. But there is more to it than that. Read more >


Consequences of Insomnia Go Beyond Fatigue, Poor Performance
Susan H. Scher, MD

Insomnia is a major health risk. It erodes your quality of life. But too few doctors even ask... Read more >


Oxytocin Could Help Introverts Feel More Outgoing
Alice G. Walton

The mother-baby bonding hormone, oxytocin, made introverts feel more outgoing and trusting. Read more >


Uncovering Why Marijuana Has Opposing Effects on the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Smoking pot can make people calm, anxious, or even psychotic. A study reveals the chemical culprit.. Read more >


Adrenal Hormone DHEA For Menopause Symptoms
Alice G. Walton

The hormone DHEA sounds like a miracle: it may ease menopause symptoms and boost sexual interest. Read more >


Depression: Paving the Road to Recovery
Neil Wagner

People who suffer from depression can learn to overcome their tendency to overgeneralize and ruminate about difficulties. Read more >


Important Link in the Stress Response Could Mean Better Treatment
Alice G. Walton

Researchers discover an important step in the stress response, which, if blocked, could stop... Read more >


Children and Family Violence
Esther Entin, M.D.

The brains of children exposed to family violence show changes similar to those of soldiers... Read more >


Dreams Can Help Heal Mental Wounds
Alice G. Walton

REM sleep can reduce the emotional impact of traumatic memories. Read more >


Gestational BPA Linked to Developmental Problems in Girls, Not Boys
Alice G. Walton

Higher BPA levels during pregnancy are linked to cognitive and emotional problems in children. Read more >


All Work and No Play
Esther Entin, M.D.

The time kids spend just playing is declining. Well-meaning parents are partly to blame. Read more >


Tweet This: Twitter As Research Tool
Leslie Carr

The timing and emotional tenor of Twitter posts offer a picture of when we are happiest and when... Read more >


How We React to Stress Influences Performance
Alice G. Walton

How you interpret your stress can influence how you perform on tests. Read more >


The Cost of the Economy: How to Recover Health and Happiness in the Face of Financial Crisis
Alice G. Walton

What you can do to cope with the stress of financial hardship – emotionally and practically. Read more >


Researchers Unravel How Stress Leads to Depression
Alice G. Walton

Stress can lead to depression, but new brain cells may be responsible for stopping the process... Read more >


Can Unexpected Panic Attacks Be Predicted?
Neil Wagner

Subtle cues precede most attacks. The trick is listening to them and preventing them. Read more >


Parenting and Temperament: Does "Goodness of Fit" Matter?
Esther Entin, M.D.

Certain styles of parenting are more beneficial for children with difficult temperaments, such as the anxious or depressed. Read more >


Generalized Anxiety and Interpersonal Relationship Problems Deeply Intertwined
Alice G. Walton

People with anxiety often have problematic social relationships, partly as a result of their worries Read more >


Blue Again: Antidepressants May Lead to Future Depression
Neil Wagner

For all the good they do, antidepressants may lead to another bout of depression. Here's why... Read more >


Risk-Taking Behavior: It's Complicated
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Teens are surprisingly risk-aversive in some situations, while women are apt to take more risks... Read more >


Eating Disorder or Disordered Eating?
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Eating disorder or disordered eating? The distinction is fuzzy, but stopping early is key. Read more >


Learning to Be Positive May Help Beat Depression
Alice G. Walton

Positive activity intervention (PAI) such as writing letters of gratitude or performing acts of kindness, may help mild depression. Read more >


Pets Are Good For Everyone, Not Just "Pet People"
Neil Wagner

Pet owners score higher on a variety of measures of healthy adjustment... Read more >


The Invisible Epidemic: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Memory and the Brain
J. Douglas Bremner, M.D.



The Causes Of Autism: So Many Theories. So Few Answers.
Esther Entin, M.D.

What causes autism? What can parents do to avoid it? Early environments matter. Read more >


Training in Positive Thinking Helps Teens Interpret Life in Healthier Ways
Alice G. Walton

A simple computer program seems to help teens avoid negative thinking, which may help with anxiety.. Read more >


Eight Surprisingly Simple Ways to Boost Your Performance
Alice G. Walton

Doing your best is a balancing act involving practice, calmness and drive. What research has found. Read more >


ADHD and The Risk of Substance Abuse
Esther Entin, M.D.

Why are kids and adolescents with ADHD prone to substance use? Read more >


Pediatric Mental Health Emergencies: Where are they Treated?
Esther Entin, M.D.

Too often, children with behavioral or emotional issues are taken to the ER. Read more >


Stressful Events Lead to Unexpected Reaction in Panic Patients
Alice G. Walton

You might think people with panic disorder would fall apart in a crisis, but that's not the case... Read more >


The Roots of Body Dysmorphic Disorder
Alice G. Walton

People with body dysmorphic disorder have problems in the brain's visual processing system. Read more >


Strong Social Support Systems at Work May Lengthen Life
Alice G. Walton

Getting along well with the coworkers may lengthen your life. Getting along with the boss... not... Read more >


Dogs Can Make Medical Procedures Less Threatening
Neil Wagner

The presence of a therapy dog can help reduce the anxiety of patients waiting for an MRI - unless... Read more >


The Agony of Ecstasy: Permanent Brain Changes
Neil Wagner

The club drug Ecstasy produces changes in brain chemistry. But these may not be the type of changes. Read more >


Cooperation and Guilt Linked in the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Do we cooperate with others to experience positive feelings or avoid the bad ones? Read more >


Reducing Stress May Boost Success Rate with IVF
Alice G. Walton

Reducing stress can improve the odds of becoming pregnant through in vitro fertilization. Read more >


Alcoholism May Be Linked to Impulsivity Gene, Brain Differences
Alice G. Walton

People with alcoholism in the family tend to have a genetic variation affecting impulsivity. Environmental factors also play a role. Read more >


Food May Activate Same Addiction Centers in the Brain as Drugs
Alice G. Walton

Food addiction and drug addiction may activate the same reward areas of the brain. Read more >


Cortisol May Ease Fear of Heights
Neil Wagner

A dose of cortisol, the stress hormone secreted when we are afraid or stressed, helped acrophobics.. Read more >


Food for Thought: What the Ultimate Organ Needs to Stay Healthy
Alice G. Walton

Some foods can help you feel, think and remember better. You may know about blueberries, but curcumin? Read more >


"Talk Therapy" May Rewire the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Anxious? Cognitive behavior therapy can help. The changes it brings can be seen in the brain itself. Read more >


Exercise May Be Best Bet for IBS Sufferers
Alice G. Walton

Exercise significantly reduces the severity of IBS symptoms. Read more >


Meditation Changes the Cells of the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Meditation changes the brain, with areas related to learning and memory expanding and areas related to anxiety, contracting. Read more >


How to Beat Test Anxiety
Neil Wagner

Writing about your anxiety may help release some of its grip and enable you to perform more in line with your ability. Read more >


New Research Shows Us Why We Should Listen to the Heart
Alice G. Walton

Do people listen to their bodies have better instincts when it comes to making intuitive decisions? Read more >


New Antibiotics Brings Relief to IBS Sufferers
Alice G. Walton

A new antibiotic may bring significant relief to IBS sufferers; but will it work over the long-term? Read more >


Research Pinpoints Brain Site of Fear Response
Neil Wagner

The amygdala, a tiny almond-shaped structure in the brain, appears to strongly influence our fear response. Read more >


The Happiness of the Unemployed Rises Again
Alice G. Walton

If you've been laid off, take heart: new research shows that within one year, you'll be about as happy as you were before the layoff. Read more >


New Drinks for the New Year
Neil Wagner

Think before you drink. Not only is alcohol a risk factor for cancer and injury, it contains quite a few empty calories. Read more >


Can Sleep Deprivation Prevent Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder?
Alice G. Walton

Scientists have found a way to disrupt upsetting memories of traumatic events: sleep deprivation. Read more >


Antidepressant Use Climbs as Talk Therapy Rates Drop - But Is Mindfulness the Key?
Alice G. Walton

More people are seeking treatment for depression. But the type of treatment they choose may not be.. Read more >


Stress Not So Bad for the Belly
Alice G. Walton

Stress isn't behind as much weight gain as was previously thought, but there are sex differences... Read more >


Loneliness Comes from Within
Neil Wagner

Loneliness is not so much a condition as a reflection of how we see ourselves and others. Read more >


It's Quality, Not Quantity, of Sleep That's Important for New Moms
Alice G. Walton

Even though they may total enough hours at night, interrupted sleep is what hurts new moms. Read more >


How You See Others Says a Lot about You
Neil Wagner

How we see others says more about our own personalities than it does about theirs'. Read more >


Being More Connected to Those Around You May Lengthen Your Life
Alice G. Walton

Having a strong social support system rivals quitting smoking in terms of the years it can add to our lives. Read more >


Putting Meditation to the Test
Alice G. Walton

Science is putting the ancient practice to the test. It appears that being mindful can change your brain and your behavior. Read more >


Managing Obesity: A Work In Progress
Lawrence J. Cheskin, M.D., and Scott Kahan, M.D., M.P.H.

Two physicians discuss the risks of obesity. Learn to recognize the behavioral triggers behind overeating and overcome them. Read more >


Just 20 Minutes Outdoors Can Work Wonders
Neil Wagner

Just 20 minutes out in nature - even a small garden - can help re-energize you. Read more >


Cutting: Teens Who Hurt Themselves
Esther Entin, M.D.

The medical community calls it "non-suicidal self-injury" (NSSI); the kids call it "cutting." Read more >


Alcohol and Adolescents: The Need to Teach our Children Well
Esther Entin, M.D.

Teen drinking is not like on TV. There are real risks, like auto accidents and impaired brain development. Read more >


Nerve Block May Help Treat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Alice G. Walton

A promising experimental treatment for intractable PTSD involves anesthetizing the nerves of the stellate ganglion. Read more >


Side Effects of Antidepressants More Common Than Previously Thought
Neil Wagner

Antidepressant medications have many side effects. Too often these go unreported by doctors and patients. Read more >


The Female Reproductive Cycle...Explained
Alice G. Walton

The hormonal changes surrounding ovulation are often intense. Read more >


Exercise as Mental Health Treatment
Neil Wagner

Exercise is a useful component of any mental health treatment plan. Read more >


Packing up Your Troubles Really Works
Neil Wagner

Sealing up a reminder of an unpleasant experience and throwing it or putting it away may help you move on. Read more >


Stressed Out, Part II: Managing Stress
Alice G. Walton

Stress is a fact of life, but you can learn to manage it better, both mentally and physically. Read more >


Don't Worry, Be Active
Neil Wagner

Exercise can reduce the anxiety people may feel when living with a chronic illness. Read more >


Six Months of Nicotine Patches Work Better Than Two
Neil Wagner

Nicotine patches tend to be more effective when used for longer periods of time. Read more >


Mild Depression Should Not be Left Untreated, Researchers Say
Alice G. Walton

People who believe they may be depressed should not ignore the symptoms. Untreated symptoms raise the odds of full-blown depression. Read more >


Fish Oil May Help Prevent Psychosis
Neil Wagner

Study finds omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil may help prevent youth psychosis. Read more >


Psychiatric Drugs During Pregnancy: Benefits, Risks, Alternatives
Esther Entin, M.D.

Timing makes a difference when it comes to taking antidepressant and anti-anxiety drugs while pregnant. Read more >


Children Left On the Home Front When Moms and Dads Go to War
Esther Entin, M.D.

Kids and caregivers left behind during deployment have to shoulder a heavy burden. A study looks at what can help. Read more >


Kids' Mental Health Needs Often Unmet
Esther Entin, M.D.

Treating children for mental health problems can reduce the risk that the problems will get worse. Read more >


England Gets Serious about Penalty Kicks
Neil Wagner

England has lost three World Cups on penalty kicks, so researchers came up with a new strategy. Read more >


Well Adjusted, Over 40, and Single
Alice G. Walton

People who have never married are as basically as well-adjusted as those who are. But their autonomy has a price. Read more >


Depressed Patients' Physical Ailments Often Untreated
Neil Wagner

Depressed patients' physical symptoms are often underestimated, a fact that is detrimental to their overall health. Read more >


If the Grass is Greener... People are Healthier
Esther Entin, M.D.

Living near green space seems to make people healthier, both mentally and physically. Read more >


When It Comes to Learning New Skills, A Little Stress Is Worth It
Alice G. Walton

As stressful as learning a new skill can be, the happiness we gain from our new level of competence more than makes up for it. Read more >


Bullies and Victims Both At Risk for Future Mental Health
Esther Entin, M.D.

Both bullies and the victims of bullies may suffer from mental disorders in later life. Read more >


Stress Rewires the Brain, Unstressed Times Bring Relief
Alice G. Walton

Stress appears to rewire the brain, making it respond in an obsessive, repetitive rather than creative fashion. The good news is... Read more >


Antidepressant Nation: A Good Thing?
Neil Wagner

Antidepressant use has doubled over the last decade according to a recent study. Is this a good thing or a sign that the drugs are being. Read more >


For Veterans, the War Lingers
Neil Wagner

It is no surprise: there is an epidemic of mental disorders among veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. A lack of social support... Read more >


These Are The Good Times
Alice G. Walton

Appreciating even the smallest positive moments in your life builds emotional strength, and wards off stress and depression. Read more >


Anxious People Need to Work Harder to Keep Up
Alice G. Walton

People who are anxious may have a hard time ignoring distractions. Read more >


Exercise as Mood Enhancer
Neil Wagner

People feel good after exercising and this feeling can last up to 12 hours. Read more >


Happiness Doesn't Come from Material, "American Dream"-Type Goals, New Study Finds
Alice G. Walton

Being beautiful, rich, and famous doesn't actually equate with being happy. More important are personal growth and social relationships. Read more >


Improving Children's Mental Health: An Updated Agenda and a Roadmap
Esther Entin, M.D.

Resilience, the ability to thrive in the face of extreme adversity, is a reason why some children develop successfully while others fail. Read more >


Lowering Job Stress May Reduce Risk for Major Depression
Alice G. Walton

Job stress can raise the chances a person will experience major depression. Read more >


Meditation, Anxiety, and ADHD
Esther Entin, M.D.

People with ADHD have a hard time filtering out stimuli present in the environment and deciding which deserve their attention. Read more >


Fear Reaction Different in Anxious and Depressed Adolescents and Adults
Alice G. Walton

The neurotransmitter serotonin is important in regulating the fear response. Read more >


Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression
Neil Wagner

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy asks people to observe their thoughts and to focus on the physical sensation of breathing. Read more >


Exercise Helps Moderate Anger in Overweight Children
Alice G. Walton

Exercise appears to reduce children's anger as it increases fitness. Read more >


Bad Managers Raise Risk of Heart Disease
Neil Wagner

Stress at work from a bad boss can increase your risk of heart disease. Read more >


Gulf War Illness, Unraveled
Neil Wagner

Gulf War illness was originally dismissed by many as a psychosomatic illness. Then a cause was found. Read more >


Take 12 Bars and Call me in the Morning: Music, Mood and Illness
Neil Wagner

Listening to music you like (it does not matter what kind) can lower anxiety, reduce pain and improve mood. Read more >


Smokers Quit in Clusters
Alice G. Walton

When people close to you quit smoking, you are more likely to quit as well. Read more >


Virtual Reality Therapy as a Treatment for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
Neil Wagner

A new study of has found a surprising use for virtual reality technology — as a therapeutic method for helping people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. Read more >


Meditation Can Reduce Reliance on Hypertension Medication
Leslie Carr

Simple relaxation and stress management techniques may make it possible for elderly people with a form of high blood pressure reduce their reliance on antihypertensive drugs, which pose certain risks for this age group. Read more >


The Children of 9/11
Tom Gilbert

Nearly 73 percent of children who lost a parent in the Sept. 11, 2001, World Trade Center catastrophe developed a psychiatric illness in the years following the event. Read more >


Smoking, Quitting and Genetics
Eric Siu, M.Sc., Nael Al Koudsi, H.B.Sc., Man Ki Ho, H.B.Sc., Rachel F. Tyndale, M.Sc., Ph.D

Nicotine's addictive properties are a result of the activation of the special receptors in the brain. Read more >


OCD: In Your Genes
Tom Gilbert

Genes appear to play a key role in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Read more >


Suicide Assessment, Intervention and Prevention
Morton M. Silverman, M.D.



A Body to Die For: The ABC's of Eating Disorders
Kathryn J. Zerbe, M.D.

Recovering bulimics should protect their teeth by NOT brushing vigorously. Read more >


Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
Gary M. Gray, M.D.

Tincture of opium may help relieve IBS symptoms when other medicines fail. Read more >


More than a Little Heartburn: Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)
Gary M. Gray, M.D.

To reduce episodes of heartburn, avoid cigarettes,late night meals and alcohol and coffee in the evening. Read more >


Anxiety Disorders
Kathryn J. Zerbe, M.D.

Psychodynamic therapy works best with those who are curious to learn more about themselves and their inner thoughts. Read more >


A Fate Worse than Debt: Credit Cards and Stress
Tom Gilbert

Most Americans know from personal experience that high credit card debt is bad for their financial health. Read more >


The Neurobiology of Depression
Juan F. Lopez, M.D.



Coronary Heart Disease in Women
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

Two common conditions that can produce chest pain and are frequently confused with angina are esophageal reflux disease and panic attacks. Read more >


The Response to Stress
Bruce McEwen, Ph.D., and Dean Krahn, M.D

What do we mean when we say we are "stressed out"? We may just be having a bad day, or feeling pressured by too many things to do and too little time to do them. Read more >


Rewards and Addictions
Dean D. Krahn, M.D.

Drug abusers, alcoholics and overeaters may appear to be out of control but, actually, it's the opposite. Their brain chemistry, thrown out of balanceby substance abuse, is strongly dictating their behavior. Read more >


What We Know about Unhealthy Behaviors and How You Can Change Them
Dean D. Krahn, M.D.

We pride ourselves on our intelligence but we still engage in many unhealthy behaviors — eating and drinking to excess, smoking, abusing drugs. Read more >





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