August 29, 2014
   
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Family Intervention Helps Prevent Psychosis in Vulnerable Youth
Esther Entin, M.D.

When family communication and dynamics improve, psychosis can be nipped in the bud. Read more >


Children‘s Lunch Boxes Fail Nutrition Test
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Tips for sendings kids to school with healthy lunches they'll enjoy. Read more >


Enlisting Community Pharmacies to Improve Healthcare Delivery and Savings
Esther Entin, M.D.

Your local pharmacist just may be one of the best healthcare cost-containment strategies around. Read more >


Stress Is a Recipe for Weight Gain
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Stress can add an extra 100 calories day — even if you don't eat more. For those who are depressed, it's even worse news. Read more >


The Childhood Obesity Crisis: Who Is in Denial?
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Kids can have inaccurate ideas about their own weight. Parents, too. What helps. Read more >


Outdoor Time Breeds Fitness in Children
Esther Entin, M.D.

Time outside translates into more physical exercise. That brings better health. Read more >


Unstructured Time Helps Develop Children's “Executive” Skills
Esther Entin, M.D.

Children learn the “executive” skills that will help them run their lives best when they have unstructured time. Read more >


Skip the Hotdogs; Help Your Heart
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Processed red meats raise the risk of heart trouble — and death — by a lot. Have a fish taco. Read more >


3D Mammography Detects More Tumors, Reduces Recalls Versus 2D Alone
Charlotte LoBuono

Breast cancer screening may soon be far more accurate and far more reassuring. Read more >


Sugars' Hidden Identities Create Problems for Consumers
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

When we can't trust the labels on our soft drinks to report sugar content accurately, it spells trouble. Read more >


An Obsession with Popularity Can Handicap Teens' Social Development
Esther Entin, M.D.

Kids obsessed with who's cool may be less popular later in life. They don't know how to make friends. Read more >


Researchers Dispute Claims that Supplements Offer Little or No Benefit
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Several studies find nutritional supplements provide little or no benefit. But not everyone agrees. Read more >


Getting Active in Your 70s (or Later) Can Reduce the Risk of Disability
Alice G. Walton

Reduce your chances of landing in a nursing home -- walk a few blocks more. It may be all you need. Read more >


Closing the Gap in Alcohol Treatment
Esther Entin, M.D.

Physicians don't offer counseling and AA-type programs can't offer drug therapies. The ACA may help. Read more >


Climate Change: A Threat to Human Nutrition
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Rising CO2 levels can interfere with photosynthesis, robbing some foods of important nutrients. Read more >


Apathy, Inactivity, and Brain Atrophy
Esther Entin, M.D.

The prospect of dementia haunts people over 50, but what they ought to fear is apathy and inactivity. Read more >


A Steep Rise in Diabetes Seen in Children and Teens in the U.S.
Esther Entin, M.D.

Kids are eating more and exercising less. The upshot is a huge increase in diabetes -- and medical costs. Read more >


The Keys to Life after a Heart Attack: Medication and Lifestyle Changes Part 2
Richard Josephson, M.D., and Sri K. Madan Mohan, M.D.

For many people, having a heart attack is a wake-up call that sets them on a healthier path. Read more >


The Keys to Life after a Heart Attack: Medication and Lifestyle Changes Part 1
Richard Josephson, M.D., and Sri K. Madan Mohan, M.D.

More and more people are surviving heart attacks, but follow-up care is crucial. Know your options. Read more >


Early Morning Light May Help Keep Weight under Control
Alice G. Walton

Getting some early morning sun may not only wake you up – it may help you slim down. Read more >


Certain Food Environments Seem to Promote the Risk of Obesity
Charlotte LoBuono

Is a fast food stop part of your daily commute? Count on serious weight gain. Read more >


Weight Gain During and After Pregnancy Signals Serious Health Problems
Esther Entin, M.D.

It's not a problem to gain weight when you are pregnant, but you need to lose it after the baby arrives. Read more >


Parents' Over-Feeding Can Encourage Infants' Overeating
Esther Entin, M.D.

Overfeeding babies sets the stage for lifelong weight problems. It's easy to avoid the pitfalls. Read more >


Men's Prostate Cancer Linked to BPA Exposure
Charlotte LoBuono

The endocrine disrupting compound is found at high levels in men with prostate cancer. What's at work. Read more >


New Mothers Face An Increased the Risk of Stroke
Esther Entin, M.D.

New moms are at higher risk for having a stroke, but too often the signs go unnoticed. Read more >


Acetaminophen Use in Pregnancy May Raise Risk of Hyperactivity
Esther Entin, M.D.

Acetaminophen has some bad effects on unborn babies and may be behind the rising rates of ADHD. Read more >


Video Game Improves Ball Players' Vision and Skills
Charlotte LoBuono

A video game helped baseball players improve their vision. The results were seen on the field. Read more >


Life After Weight Loss Surgery
Leslie Carr

Bariatric surgery can help some lose enough weight to improve their health, but it is not problem-free. Read more >


Exposure to Ultraviolet Rays Lowers Blood Pressure
Esther Entin, M.D.

A little time in the sun significantly lowered blood pressure. But what about skin cancer? Read more >


Weight in Kindergarten Predicts Obesity Later in Life
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

If your child is overweight, he or she needs your help. The weight isn't going to come off naturally. Read more >


Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Diagnoses on The Rise
Esther Entin, M.D.

More and more children are being diagnosed and treated for attention deficits. Is this a good thing? Read more >


Too Few Doctors Talk to Teen Patients About Sex
Charlotte LoBuono

Doctors tend not to discuss sex with their teenaged patients. What a wasted opportunity. Read more >


Brain Training Can Help Prevent Cognitive Decline in the Years to Come
Alice G. Walton

Training sessions can protect aging brains against cognitive decline — up to a decade later. Read more >


BRCA Mutations and Breast Cancer, New Recommendations
Esther Entin, M.D.

Women, like Angelina Jolie, and men with BRAC gene mutations have much higher risk for breast cancer. Read more >


FDA Begins Inquiry into The Effects of Antibacterial Soaps
Esther Entin, M.D.

The active ingredient has been found in breast milk. FDA investigates. Read more >


Santa Claus, Aging Successfully
Neil Wagner

How healthy is Santa Claus? He surely has some belly fat. But he's actually in pretty good shape. Read more >


For Teens, Sleep Is a Family Affair
Esther Entin, M.D.

Puberty wreaks havoc on teens' sleep cycles; so do teens' family and social relationships. Read more >


How to Keep Those Holiday Pounds Off
Neil Wagner

The holidays are a great time...to gain weight. Here are tips for ways to avoid picking up pounds. Read more >


SIDS Appears Linked to Brain Abnormalities
Alice G. Walton

Babies who die of SIDS may have brain abnormalities that make them miss signals to breathe again. Read more >


Parents Need to Step Up And Limit Screen Time
Esther Entin, M.D.

How many hours a day does you child spend in front of a screen? You can bring it under control. Read more >


Reader Beware: Study Results May Be Overstated
Neil Wagner

Scientists often overstate their findings. It's about attention. Read more >


How Couples Use Texting Can Bring Them Closer, Drive Them Apart
Charlotte LoBuono

Text messages offer lovers another way to whisper endearments. But some texts just shouldn't be sent. Read more >


Too Much of a Good Thing: Antibiotics Overprescribed For Sore Throats
Charlotte LoBuono

Your throat is sore. Sure, it's terrible; but if you're an adult, it is unlikely you need an antibiotic. Read more >


Young Children Behave Better When They Have a Consistent Bedtime
Esther Entin, M.D.

Young children need to go to bed at a regular, consistent time. Think of it as a miracle cure for bad behavior. Read more >


Brain Changes Are Seen in More Ex-Football Players
Alice G. Walton

Former football players may have "pronounced" brain abnormalities, even if they do not have dementia. Read more >


A Parental Wake-Up Call: Yelling Doesn't Help
Esther Entin, M.D.

No parent starts out wanting to yell at his or her child. But somewhere along the line, usually in adolescence, most of us do. Read more >


Severe Obesity On the Rise Among Kids and Teens
Charlotte LoBuono

The fattest kids are getting fatter. Parents and doctors need to step in to help. Read more >


Obamacare: Health Insurance Policy Costs Begin to Emerge
Neil Wagner

A running start on what's happening and what's available for individuals and families. Read more >


Lifestyle Changes Reverse Aging in Chromosomes
Michael J. Gertner

When we eat right, exercise and receive emotional support, even our chromosomes look younger. Read more >


Antipsychotic Use in Children
Esther Entin, M.D.

Children taking certain antipsychotics for behavioral problems are far more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Read more >


Poverty's Mental Toll
Leslie Carr

Being poor robs you of mental bandwidth. The toll money worries take is roughly equal to losing 13 points off your IQ score. Read more >


Frustrated Football Fans Find Consolation in Food
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Win or lose, NFL teams' records affect their fans' eating patterns...for better and worse. Read more >


Soda Consumption and Bad Behavior
Esther Entin, M.D.

It's not clear what it is in soda that brings on aggression and hostility, but the link is there. Read more >


NVC -- Cerebral Blood Flow and Mental Processing: The Case for Cocoa
Charlotte LoBuono

Our brains use blood the way a Formula 1 car guzzles gas. Cocoa appears to help keep blood flowing. Read more >


Preventing Drop-Outs: Keeping Kids Engaged in School
Esther Entin, M.D.

Keeping kids engaged in school is perhaps the most important thing you can do to foster success. Read more >


When Bullying Hits Home: Sibling Rivalry or Dangerous Victimization?
Esther Entin, M.D.

Siblings will fight, but bullying happens at home, too. And the emotional impact is just as serious as when it happens at school. Read more >


The Rising Threat of West Nile Virus
Charlotte LoBuono

Know the symptoms. And please, use insect repellent when mosquitoes are active. Read more >


Vaginal Changes After Menopause
Nancy A. Phillips, M.D. and Gloria A. Bachmann, M.D.

Pain during sex is a common experience among older women, but it doesn't have to be that way. Read more >


The Right Routine for a Good Night's Sleep
Neil Wagner

Getting a good night's sleep is a pretty easy habit to get into. So why do millions not get the health-sustaining sleep they deserve? Read more >


Pediatricians and LGBTQ Teens
Esther Entin, M.D.

Whether a teenager's sexual orientation is gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or questioning, his or her doctor is an important ally. Read more >


Help Navigating the World of Dietary Supplements
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Consumers now have help navigating the uncharted waters of the enormous supplement market. Read more >


Liposuction, A Possible Source of Stem Cells
Michael J. Gertner

A lab catastrophe leads to a discovery that may give "fat farm" new meaning — stem cells from fat cells. Read more >


Soda Bans Appear to Find Their Target
Alice G. Walton

So-called “soda bans” may actually help those who need it most. Read more >


Identifying Motor Delays in Children
Esther Entin, M.D.

Baby still not crawling? The AAP helps you figure out when delays matter. Read more >


Exercise As a Treatment for Depression
Esther Entin, M.D.

Exercise is a valuable treatment for depression, especially for those who have trouble with antidepressants. Read more >


Re-Tuning the Brain: Ultrasound's Effect on Mood
Neil Wagner

You can't feel or hear it, but ultrasound improved patients' pain and mood. Read more >


Game-Changing New Report on Sodium Stirs Controversy
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

While eating too much salt can be dangerous, taking in too little is perhaps even riskier. The IOM and AHA face off. Read more >


Breast Milk and Necrotizing Enterocolitis
Esther Entin, M.D.

A breast milk appears to protect against a serious gastrointestinal problem facing babies. Read more >


Amusement Ride Injuries Rise in Summer Months
Charlotte LoBuono

Summertime means vacation and trips to the amusement park. But before you strap yourself and your kids in, consider the safety issues. Read more >


Just One Sugary Drink A Day Increases Diabetes Risk Significantly
Alice G. Walton

Oh come on! How much can one little sugary drink a day up your risk for diabetes? Pretty significantly. Read more >


There's Earning, and Then There's Overearning
Alice G. Walton

Having more than we can possibly use can put dent in happiness. Read more >


Substance in Red Meat Linked to Heart Disease
Charlotte LoBuono

TMAO, a substance found in abundance in the guts of meat eaters, has artery-clogging effects. But is meat the problem? Read more >


Companies Help Workers Lose Weight on the Job
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Companies seeking to cut healthcare costs might want to consider offering financial incentives for weight loss. Read more >


A Shift Away from Fast Food
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Americans are eating less fast food. You can guess what group eats the most. Read more >


Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: Definitions, Symptoms, and Treatment
Joel Schilling, M.D., Ph.D.

Heart failure is one of the most common and life-threatening conditions in the U.S. What to do when things go from bad to worse. Read more >


New Guidelines to Help Prevent Food Allergy in Children
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

New guidelines recommend babies be gradually exposed to allergenic foods early to avoid wheat, egg, and other allergies. Read more >


Confirmed: The Cardiovascular Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Olive oil, nuts, a glass of wine, what's not to love about the Mediterranean diet? It prevents heart attacks, too. Read more >


Helicopter Parents: When Mothering Is Smothering
Neil Wagner

College kids whose parents haven't learned to let go are prone to anxiety and depression. Support autonomy. Read more >


Popular Misconceptions (and a Few Facts) about Obesity
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

A study in The New England Journal of Medicine shows we know less than we think we do about dieting. Read more >


Green Coffee Extract: Weight Loss Miracle or Just Another Fad?
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

The pounds just melt away! Can you believe it? It's worth a closer look. Read more >


FDA to Weigh in on Genetically Modified Mosquitoes
Neil Wagner

There were 27 cases of dengue in 2009. Genetic modification may stop mosquitoes' transmission of this deadly virus. What else will it do? Read more >


Obese and Overweight Children Face Serious Health Risks
Esther Entin, M.D.

You wouldn't let your child play near the street unsupervised; don't let him or her eat unsupervised either. Read more >


Finding the Sweet Spot: Milk Intake, Vitamin D and Iron
Esther Entin, M.D.

Cow's milk offers vitamin D but also contributes to low iron. New research offers a guideline. Read more >


Reframing the Debate: Gun Violence As a Public Health Issue
Charlotte LoBuono

Successful public health campaigns are models for how to make guns safer and reduce their allure. Read more >


Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents
Esther Entin, M.D.

Moodiness is not uncommon in kids, so how do you know if your child or teen is suffering from mood swings related to this disorder? Read more >


Health Tips to Carry Forward into 2013
Leslie Carr

New years are for fresh starts and self improvement. Here are some findings to take with you into 2013. Read more >


Pediatricians Come Out in Favor of Emergency Contraception for Teens
Esther Entin, M.D.

The AAP says girls need to know emergency contraception is an option when birth control fails. Read more >


The Emotional Lives of Parents
Alice G. Walton

Some studies suggest parenting is linked to happiness, while others claim the opposite. A new one gets closer to the truth. Read more >


Endocrine Disruptor Compounds: What We Know; What We Suspect
Esther Entin, M.D.

You can't see, smell or taste these environmental toxins. But even lose doses can cause cancer. Read more >


Tea's Many Health Benefits
Charlotte LoBuono

Tea is a plant food. And much like a serving of fruit or vegetables, it provides important health benefits. Read more >


A Ball by Any Other Name: How Dogs Process Language
Alice G. Walton

When your dog hears a human word, he processes it his own way. This could be helpful for training. Read more >


Are Cooking Shows Making Us Fat?
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Are cooking shows, with their exotic locales and gorgeous food, contributing to our waistlines? Read more >


The Impact of Eating Out on Children's and Adolescents' Nutrition
Esther Entin, M.D.

Kids eat out a lot. And when they do, they consume extra salt, fat, sugar, and of course, calories. Read more >


The Wandering Mind: Inspiration, Introspection and Distraction
Neil Wagner

Letting your mind wander can be a great way to solve problems. It's also a good way to waste time. Read more >


Safety Seats? It Depends on How You Use Them
Neil Wagner

Strap your kid in and they're safe, right? Wrong. And for kids aged 4 to 8, seatbelts alone won't do it. Read more >


Enlisting Exergames in the Fight Against Childhood Obesity
Esther Entin, M.D.

"Exergames," video games controlled by players' motion, offer a new way to raise children's activity levels. Read more >


What You Need to Know About Apples
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Autumn is a good time to rediscover apples. Don't take these health dynamos for granted. Read more >


The Effects of Social Violence in Children's TV Shows
Esther Entin, M.D.

All the gossip, rejection, teasing and excluding that goes on on shows sets the wrong tone. Read more >


Molecularly Targeted Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors
Nicole A. Shonka, M.D. and Mark R. Gilbert, M.D.

Chemotherapies for glioblastomas aim to prevent tumor cell growth or promote cell death. Read more >


Genetically Modified Food: An Overview and History
Neil Wagner

In the U.S. genetically modified foods are patented and immune from scientific investigation. No wonder some feel there's a danger. Read more >


Ratcheting up Herbicide Use Encourages Resistant Weeds
Neil Wagner

Genetically modified crops help potent herbicides succeed. But now super weeds are taking over. Read more >


Bringing Your Nutritional Makeover Home
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Planning meals is key to your nutritional makeover. Eating out? Bag some food before you begin. Read more >


Nutrition 101 -Part 2
The First Three Steps to a Nutrition Makeover
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Small steps work best when you start a nutritional makeover. Read more >


Glial Cells
R. Douglas Fields, Ph.D.

Glia were completely overlooked until it was discovered that Einstein's brain was packed with them. Read more >


Nutrition 101: Finding Reliable Sources of Nutrition Information
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

What's the difference between a registered dietitian and a nutritionist? It's not a joke; it's important. Read more >


Newborn Screening
Esther Entin, M.D.

Screening newborns for a variety of conditions saves lives. But finding care can be difficult. Read more >


Medical Decision-Making on Behalf of Children and Adolescents
Jessie Hill, J.D.

Can a child or teen seek medical treatment without parental consent? Maybe. It pays to know the issues. Read more >


Lazy Eye (Amblyopia): Causes, Treatment and Outcomes
Courtney L. Kraus, M.D., and Susan M. Culican, M.D., Ph.D.

Amblyopia is a disorder of brain development. The sooner a child is treated, the better. Read more >


The Health Effects of Caffeine
Charlotte LoBuono

Coffee, or more generally, caffeine, offers many protective effects; except when it comes to fertility. Read more >


Alternative Medicine: Does the Research Support the Movement? Part 3: Yoga
Alice G. Walton

Yoga has some proven benefits and unproven claims. What you can, and can't, expect it to do for you. Read more >


Cytomegalovirus, A Serious Health Risk Hiding in Plain Sight
Esther Entin, M.D.

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is responsible for roughly 20% of the hearing loss in newborns. Read more >


Big Beverage vs. A Big Health Problem
Harry A. Levy, M.D., M.P.H.

Is the move to restrict serving sizes of soda in NYC a bad idea or a bold way to begin tackling obesity? Read more >


Pancreatic Cancer: Treating and Managing the Disease
Parvin Peddi, M.D., and Andrea Wang-Gillam, M.D.

The death of Steve Jobs made more people aware of pancreatic cancer, but it remains tough to treat. Read more >


The Mainstreaming of Alternative Medicine: Does the Research Support the Movement? Part 2: Meditation
Alice G. Walton

Meditation increases the size of brain areas associated with memory and reduces our vulnerability to stress. Read more >


New and Controversial Recommendations on PSA Tests
Neil Wagner

For most men the risks connected with PSA tests for prostate cancer outweigh the benefits. Read more >


Alternative Medicine: Does the Research Support the Movement? Part 1: Acupuncture
Alice G. Walton

It's hard to know what to believe when it comes to alternative medical practices. Read more >


Managing Major Depression During Pregnancy: To Treat or Not to Treat?
Jennifer L. Payne, M.D.

Taking antidepressants while pregnant can mean choosing between a woman's mental health and potential risks to the fetus. Read more >


The Happiness Dilemma
Alice G. Walton

The pursuit of happiness is not as simple as we might think. What you focus on can make a big difference to your health. Read more >


Helping Kids Lose Weight
Alice G. Walton

Helping your child lose weight is tricky. You may want to start by changing your own behavior. Read more >


Recess: A Learning Opportunity
Esther Entin, M.D.

Recess can be an arena for bullies or a lab for learning the social skills needed to get past conflict. Read more >


Tracking Disease Clusters in the US: Elusive Prey
Alice G. Walton

Disease clusters were made famous by Erin Brockovich, but they are harder to pinpoint than you might think. Read more >


Pediatric Acute Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome, PANS
Esther Entin, M.D.

Infection can sometimes bring on sudden bizarre obsessions and compulsions in children. Knowing the signs can help. Read more >


Less Frequent Pap Testing Recommended
Susan H. Scher, MD

Pap tests save lives, but new guidelines urge women to be tested less often. It's safer. Read more >


Endometriosis: Symptoms, Treatments, and Becoming Pregnant
Kenan Omurtag, M.D., and Amber R. Cooper, M.D., M.S.C.I.

When tissue from the lining of the uterus starts to grow outside it, fertility can be affected. Read more >


Breastfeeding as a Public Health - and Family – Issue
Esther Entin, M.D.

Breastfeeding has so many health benefits, it's like a miracle drug. But work and family can be obstacles. Read more >


Neuroethics: The Brain Sciences Pose Ethical - and Philosophical - Conundrums
Martha J. Farah, Ph.D. and Jonathan D. Moreno, Ph.D.

Neuroethics asks, if your high test score is the work of a brain-enhancing drug, is it fair? What is neuromarketing anyway? Read more >


The Body's Clock And Its Role in Health
Alice G. Walton

Jet lag and seasonal depression are just two ways our bodies remind us that we have an inner clock that affects our health. Read more >


Little League Safety: Protecting Future All Stars
Esther Entin, M.D.

Tips to keep Little Leaguers injury-free. Learn the rules and risks and stay out of the ER. Read more >


Why We Overeat and What We Can Do About It
Alice G. Walton

Eating should be simple: Eat when you are hungry, then stop. If only food weren't so pleasurable. Read more >


Punch Drunk: Repetitive Brain Injury
Alice G. Walton

Chronic head injuries can cause dementia, violence and death. Helmets may not help. Read more >


A Closer Look at Over-the-Counter Painkillers
Alice G. Walton

Turning to acetaminophen, ibuprofen and aspirin now and then is fine, but long-term use can damage organs. Read more >


From Sepsis to Shock: What Happens When Bacteria Invade the Body
Jeffrey P. Green, M.D.

Severe sepsis is a raging infection that shuts down organs. It is important to find it fast, but that can be tricky. Read more >


The Marriage Problem
Alice G. Walton

Marriage carries with it the threat of divorce. But it also offers significant health benefits. Read more >


Resolution Rx
Leslie Carr

Has the thrill of the resolution you made in December given way to a sense of defeat? You can fix it. Read more >


Figuring The Cost-Benefit Ratio of Vaccines
Alice G. Walton

Parents in some communities have decided that the risks of vaccines are greater than the benefits. Not true. Read more >


Progestins and the Brain
Muye Zhu and Roberta Diaz Brinton, Ph.D.

Progestins influence virtually every major organ system, particularly the brain, where they may prevent cell degeneration. Read more >


Having Trouble with Parenthood? You Are Not Alone
Alice G. Walton

Having kids interrupts your sleep, destabilizes your relationship, and costs lots of money and time. So what's the upside? Read more >


Gluten-Free Diets: Reality Check
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Gluten is bad news for some people. Are you one of them? Read more >


It's the Most Wonderful Time of the Year (If You Keep Your Head about You)
Alice G. Walton

Why are the holidays responsible for so many accidents and ER visits? We count the ways and offer help. Read more >


Endometrial Cancer: The Most Common Reproductive Cancer in Women
Yevgeniya Ioffe, M.D., and Israel Zighelboim, M.D

Endometrial carcinoma can be detected early if you know what to look for. Read more >


Alcohol: Friend or Foe?
Alice G. Walton

Drinking offers health benefits and risks. Get help sifting through the latest findings. Read more >


Navigating the Road to Health
Alice G. Walton

Don't confuse real health science with sound-bytes, or healthy lifestyles with a health obsession. Read more >


Phytochemicals: The Protection Packed in Plant Foods
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Phytochemicals protect plants, and they appear to do the same for us. And they are easy to find. Read more >


Evaluating Healthcare in America
Alice G. Walton

A score of 64 out of 100 is not a good grade. It's also not good healthcare. Read more >


Vitamin and Mineral Supplements: Risks As Well As Benefits
Neil Wagner

Some studies of supplements actually found they increase the risk of death. But it may depend on how you crunch the numbers. Read more >


How Your Health Choices Can Change Your Genes
Alice G. Walton

Genes are not just static building blocks. Health choices and the environment influence them. Read more >


Antioxidants Explained
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Eating a wide variety of plant foods is the best way to fend off the oxidation that "rusts" our cells. Read more >


Seasonal Affective Disorder: Coming Out of the Cold
Alice G. Walton

Seasonal affective disorder occurs when a lack of sun disrupts the body's circadian and serotonin cycles. It a real form of depression. Read more >


The Power of Play
Esther Entin, M.D.

The time kids spend just playing is declining. Well-meaning parents are partly to blame. Read more >


The Animal-Free Diet: The Pros and Cons of Vegetarianism and Veganism
Alice G. Walton

Vegan or vegetarian, there are risks and benefits to these food lifestyles. Two experts offer help. Read more >


Bringing Home Baby: Doctors and Parents Offer Advice on the Big Decisions
Alice G. Walton

What would new moms do differently the next time around? Reconsidering circumcision and breastfeeding are high on the list. Read more >


Pressure Ulcers: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention
Robert J. Pignolo, M.D., Ph.D.

When skin is under unrelieved pressure, it breaks down and ulcers occur. Prevention is key. Read more >


Antibiotic Resistance and The Case for Organic Meat and Poultry
Neil Wagner

Organic meat and poultry could help combat much of the antibiotic resistance we see today. Read more >


Redefining Health: What Does It Mean to be Healthy, and How Do We Get There?
Alice G. Walton

More than a checklist of foods to eat or exercises to perform, health is a cluster of behaviors and choices. Read more >


The Cost of the Economy: How to Recover Health and Happiness in the Face of Financial Crisis
Alice G. Walton

What you can do to cope with the stress of financial hardship – emotionally and practically. Read more >


Exercise for Seniors: Benefits, Risks, and How To Begin
Calvin H. Hirsch, M.D.

Exercise is the fountain of youth. So what are you waiting for? A plan to get you started. Read more >


Doctor-Patient Confidentiality: How Do We Define It and When Should We Waive It?
Jessica Wilen Berg, J.D., M.P.H.

When is your health information confidential and when isn't it? Read more >


Eating Disorder or Disordered Eating?
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Eating disorder or disordered eating? The distinction is fuzzy, but stopping early is key. Read more >


How to Mess up Your Kids
Alice G. Walton

Twelve things parents do that can damage their children. How to avoid such mistakes. Read more >


The Invisible Epidemic: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Memory and the Brain
J. Douglas Bremner, M.D.



The Causes Of Autism: So Many Theories. So Few Answers.
Esther Entin, M.D.

What causes autism? What can parents do to avoid it? Early environments matter. Read more >


Eight Surprisingly Simple Ways to Boost Your Performance
Alice G. Walton

Doing your best is a balancing act involving practice, calmness and drive. What research has found. Read more >


ADHD and The Risk of Substance Abuse
Esther Entin, M.D.

Why are kids and adolescents with ADHD prone to substance use? Read more >


Emergency Contraception: What You Need to Know
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

What's new in emergency contraception and how well does it work? Read more >


Osteoporosis: Treating and Preventing the Most Common Bone Disorder in Women and Men
Robert J. Pignolo, M.D., Ph.D.

Osteoporosis is common among men and women, but there's progress in treatment and prevention. Read more >


Sports and Energy Drinks: Not Kids Stuff
Esther Entin, M.D.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has come out with a warning about sports and energy drinks. Why? Read more >


More Reasons to Get Your Zzzzs
Alice G. Walton

Sleep can help you lose weight, make better decisions, and improve your sex life. Read more >


Coffee May Reduce the Risk of Cancer - But It Depends on the Cancer
Alice G. Walton

Coffee reduces the risk for cancers — some cancers, anyway. But is coffee always good for you? Read more >


What Is It About Relationships?
Ann Weber, Ph.D.

Psychologists have discovered some unexpected things about the close relationships key to well being. Read more >


Some Long-Held Links between Genes and Diseases Called Into Question
Alice G. Walton

Some of the connections between genes and disease that we accept as fact may not be so strong after all. Read more >


The Science of Skincare: Can We Really Slow Aging?
Alice G. Walton

Skin, our body's largest organ, has simple tastes. The best products are found in the kitchen, not the bathroom cabinet. Read more >


Children and Environmental Chemicals: A Call for Better Regulation
Esther Entin, M.D.

Children are small and low to the ground, leaving them more exposed to environmental toxins. Read more >


Family Meals Help Cut Childhood Obesity
Alice G. Walton

Just having kids cut their fat intake does not help them lose weight. So what does work? Read more >


Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: The Most Common Hormone Disorder in Women
D.A. Dumesic, M.D., M. Goodarzi, M.D., Ph.D., G. Chazenbalk, Ph.D., D. Geller, M.D., and D.H. Abbott, Ph.D.

PCOS can interfere with fertility and make pregnancy risky. Worse, it brings long-term health problems. Read more >


Are Airport Scanners Safe?
Neil Wagner

Are the full-body scanners at the airport safe? Well, it all depends. Read more >


Dangerous Exposures: Sun and Skin
Esther Entin, M.D.

Sun exposure in childhood and adolescence than can set the stage for skin cancers and problems later. Read more >


Food for Thought: What the Ultimate Organ Needs to Stay Healthy
Alice G. Walton

Some foods can help you feel, think and remember better. You may know about blueberries, but curcumin? Read more >


Simple Febrile Seizures: Revised Practice Guidelines and Advice for Parents
Esther Entin, M.D.

Seizures that occur when a child has a fever are scary, but are they dangerous? Sometimes. Read more >


Nutrition for Athletes
Lona Sandon, M.Ed., R.D.

Elite athletes can teach us all a lot about eating right. Who knew chocolate milk was the perfect recovery drink? Read more >


Nature and Nurture: Social Environments Influence Genetic Blueprints
Esther Entin, M.D.

A study of children two and under shows just how much being poor restricts kids' genetic potential. Read more >


The Skinny on Fat: How to Tell the Healthy from the Harmful
Alice G. Walton

"Fats" is not just a 4-letter word. It pays to be able to tell the good from the bad. Read more >


Keeping an Eye on Contact Lenses
Barry A. Weismman, D.O., Ph.D.

Fit matters and is harder to achieve than you might think. Infections can happen. They're your eyes. Read on. Read more >


The Best of 2010: Health Tips to Take With Us Into 2011
Alice G. Walton

Planning for a healthier 2011? We pull together some of the top health news stories of this past year. Read more >


CT Scans or X-Rays? Lung Cancer Screening Trial Raises Some (Ethical) Dilemmas
Alice G. Walton

CT scans can detect lung cancer early and save lives, but there are risks and costs to be weighed. Read more >


FDA Verdict on Patient Radiation Overdoses: Operator Error
Neil Wagner

CT scans are a boon to diagnosis, but some may expose patients to way too much radiation. Read more >


Colon Cancer: The Necessity of Getting Checked
Robin Baradarian, M.D., FACG

A primer on colon cancer screening, from virtual colonoscopies to the real thing. Don't sweat it. Do it. Read more >


Paget's Disease
Robert J. Pignolo, M.D., Ph.D.

This disorder causes bony overgrowth and problems with the bone's structure. Read more >


Diabetes and the Nervous System: How Neuropathy Develops and How It Can Be Treated
John W. Wiley, M.D., and Roberto Towns, Ph.D.

Uncontrolled blood sugar can wreak havoc on diabetics' nervous systems. Learn the signs and symptoms. Read more >


Easing Menopause: Estrogen For the Brain
Istvan Merchenthaler, M.D., Ph.D., D.Sc. and Laszlo Prokai, Ph.D., D,Sc.

Getting estrogen to your brain is the quickest route to reducing some of menopause's worst symptoms, like hot flashes and memory loss. Read more >


The Microbial Menagerie in Your GI Tract: Friends or Foes?
John Y. Kao, M.D., Nirmal Kaur, M.D., and Vincent B. Young M.D.,Ph.D.

Gastro-intestinal distress? Could be an imbalance among the billions of microbes in your GI tract. Probiotics may help. Read more >


Early-Onset Parkinson's Disease
Roy N. Alcalay, M.D., M.Sc. and Karen Marder, M.D., M.P.H.

Early-Onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD) can be difficult to diagnose. Genes play a role. Read more >


Stages of Puberty and the Risk of Violent Teens
Esther Entin, M.D.

Teen violence can de-rail young lives. A new study links it to a teen's stage of sexual development, not age. Read more >


Snakebite! What to Do If You're Bitten and How Treatments Work
Thomas C. Arnold, M.D., and Robert A. Barish, M.D., M.B.A.

Snake bites are rare, but some bites are lethal. Know what to look for and do -- and how to avoid bites completely. Read more >


Putting Meditation to the Test
Alice G. Walton

Science is putting the ancient practice to the test. It appears that being mindful can change your brain and your behavior. Read more >


The Teenager Sleep Schedule vs. the School Bell
Esther Entin, M.D.

Starting the school day just a half hour later helps teens get the sleep they need, raising motivation. Read more >


Exceptional Human Longevity
Robert J. Pignolo, M.D., Ph.D.

Who are the oldest old – those 100 years of age and older? And what can these centenarians tell us about aging? Read more >


Managing Obesity: A Work In Progress
Lawrence J. Cheskin, M.D., and Scott Kahan, M.D., M.P.H.

Two physicians discuss the risks of obesity. Learn to recognize the behavioral triggers behind overeating and overcome them. Read more >


Cutting: Teens Who Hurt Themselves
Esther Entin, M.D.

The medical community calls it "non-suicidal self-injury" (NSSI); the kids call it "cutting." Read more >


Simple or Sophisticated? The Male Reproductive System... Explained
Alice G. Walton

Men's sexual systems produce erections and millions of sperm. Their complexity is often overlooked until something goes wrong. Read more >


Alcohol and Adolescents: The Need to Teach our Children Well
Esther Entin, M.D.

Teen drinking is not like on TV. There are real risks, like auto accidents and impaired brain development. Read more >


The Genetics of Breast and Associated Cancers
Jennifer Barrick, M.S., C.G.C., Nancie Petrucelli, M.S., C.G.C., and Michael S. Simon, M.D., M.P.H.

Genetics plays a role in breast cancer risk, so do other hereditary syndromes. Learn what to look for. Read more >


Kids and Screens: Media and Health
Esther Entin, M.D.

Teens' screen time offers risks and rewards. How to minimize the risks. Read more >


The Money Pit: Health Insurance Executives' Pay
Neil Wagner

Health insurance executives are paid millions to ensure stock prices stay high. Patient care is not a concern. Read more >


The Female Reproductive Cycle...Explained
Alice G. Walton

The hormonal changes surrounding ovulation are often intense. Read more >


Stressed Out, Part II: Managing Stress
Alice G. Walton

Stress is a fact of life, but you can learn to manage it better, both mentally and physically. Read more >


TVs, DVDs, and Babies
Esther Entin, M.D.

Research shows that educational DVDs don't improve learning in children under two. Babies need interaction to learn. Read more >


Controversial Autism-MMR Vaccine Study Retracted by Journal: Why Did This Happen - and Can We Forget?
Alice G. Walton

Retractions don't happen often in science, but they are part of the process. Changing the public's perceptions is another matter. Read more >


Stressed Out: The Behavior and Biology of Stress
Alice G. Walton

Stress is a feeling, but it is also a biological response that is both helpful and harmful. Read more >


Psychiatric Drugs During Pregnancy: Benefits, Risks, Alternatives
Esther Entin, M.D.

Timing makes a difference when it comes to taking antidepressant and anti-anxiety drugs while pregnant. Read more >


Exercise: A Boost for Aging Brains and Bodies
Esther Entin, M.D.

A series of studies on exercise and aging shows that brisk walking can improve bones, heart and balance. Read more >


Prescribing Medication Safely for Children
Esther Entin, M.D.

Warnings about the effects of prescription drugs on children are often not reported accurately... Read more >


Unnecessary CT Scans and Excessive Radiation Raise Cancer Risk
Neil Wagner

CT scans have benefits, but they also have some very real cancer risks. Read more >


Why Does Health Care Cost So Much?
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

Americans' health care costs more than anywhere else in the world. Why? Read more >


Breast Milk: The Best Food Money Can't Buy
Esther Entin, M.D.

For most babies, breast milk is the best milk, but it is important to supplement with vitamin D. Read more >


Infections in Long-Term Care Facilities: Prevention, Diagnosis, and Management
Lona Mody, M.D., M.Sc.

Millions of infections occur in nursing homes each year, costing billions of dollars. Read more >


Feel Younger
John E. Morley, M.B., B.Ch. and Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D.

Feel Younger is a four−part series based on a book by TheDoctor's Aging specialist, Dr. Read more >


Well Informed

Well Informed is a two-part series designed to help you evaluate health information and understand the different kinds of scientific studies behind it. Read more >


Kids and Cholesterol: To Screen Or Not To Screen?
Esther Entin, M.D.

Children are starting to show dangerously high cholesterol, triglycerides and lipid levels. How to prevent life-long damage to young hearts. Read more >


From Silent to Serious: Chlamydia Infections in Teens and Young Adults
Esther Entin, M.D.

The STD chlamydia can be diagnosed with a urine specimen and does not require a pelvic examination or vaginal or urethral culture. Read more >


Sample Article
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This is the description (class=des) of the author(s) that were not linked. Read more >


Vaccines: Protecting Individuals, Communities and the World
Esther Entin, M.D.

Always check with your child's physician before delaying an immunization. Read more >


What's Good Health Information?
Leslie Carr and Tom Gilbert

Becoming an informed consumer of health information is as important to your health as any exercise, drug or health plan. Read more >


ADHD: Treatment With Stimulants Safer than Expected
Esther Entin, M.D.

Do the stimulants used to treat children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) put them at risk for future drug abuse? Read more >


Treating the Poisoned Patient
Barbara M. Kirrane, M.D., and Robert S. Hoffman, M.D.

Over two million people a year are exposed to poisonous toxins. Read more >


Sports-Related Concussions: Risks and Recovery
Jordana Bieze Foster

Concussions can be difficult to spot, especially when young athletes hide their symptoms to keep playing. Read more >


Our Sense of Smell
Hanyi Zhuang, Ph.D. and Hiroaki Matsunami, Ph.D.

The sense of smell is vital to humans and other animals, and it makes life more interesting. Read more >


Migraine
Richard P. Kraig, Ph.D., M.D.



Epithelial Ovarian Cancer
Renata Urban, M.D., and Jonathan S. Berek, M.D., M.M.S.

By the time most women seek treatment for epithelial ovarian cancer, the disease has already reached an advanced stage. Read more >


Understanding Scientific Studies
Tom Gilbert

It is important to know if the information you are gathering on the Web is from a credible source. Read more >


Schizophrenia and Stress
Cheryl Corcoran, M.D., and Dolores Malaspina, M.D., M.S.P.H.



The Treatment of Insomnia: New Developments
Andrew D. Krystal, M.D., M.S.



Infection Control and Healthcare
Keith F. Woeltje, M.D., Ph.D.



Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD)
Joshua L. Dunaief, M.D., Ph.D., and Leon Charkoudian, M.D.



Diabetic Muscular Infarction
Manuela Marinescu, M.D., and Peter Barland, M.D.



Losing Sleep: the Causes and Effects of Sleep Deprivation
Namni Goel, Ph.D., and David F. Dinges, Ph.D.



Selenium: A Trace Element with Real Potential
Mark Sutter, M.D. and Jennifer Brown, M.D.



Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis
John E. Morley, M.B., B.Ch. and Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D.



Strong Bones, Healthy Joints
John E. Morley, M.B., B.Ch., and Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D.

Your bone mineral density should be repeated after two years to determine your rate of bone loss. Read more >


Vitamin C, Nutrition and Disease
Yi Li, B.Sc., and Herb E. Schellhorn, Ph.D.



Vitamin D Deficiency in Children
Esther Entin, M.D.

Pediatricians have begun to look harder at Vitamin D levels in children because this vitamin, once thought to be primarily involved in calcium absorption, is now being shown to have significant implications for a variety of health conditions which manifest in later life. Read more >


Coming Soon? Targeted Therapies for Ovarian Cancer
Frederick Sweet, Ph.D.

Frederick Sweet, Ph. Read more >


Improving Your Posture and Balance
John E. Morley, M.B., B.Ch. and Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D

Posture is reflection of how you balance your body, which would fall forward if your muscles did not pull it back. Read more >


Move It: Exercise and Aging
John E. Morley, M.B., B.Ch. and Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D.



Cataracts: Causes, Prevention, Treatment
Val Shestopalov, Ph.D.



Alcohol and Health: A Double-Edged Sword
James H. O'Keefe, M.D., and John H. Lee, M.D.



Malaria
Joel G. Breman, M.D.



Something to Lose Sleep Over — Sleep Loss and Your Health
Eve Van Cauter, Ph.D.

Professor of Medicine, University of Chicago School of Medicine, Chicago, IL. Read more >


What's the Big Deal About Zinc?
Ian J. Griffin, M.D.

A possible role for zinc as a treatment for the common cold remains to be proved. Read more >


Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Stephen R. Thom, M.D., Ph.D.



The Dark Side of Public Health
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

The history of public health efforts in the United States in many ways is a story of great accomplishment. Read more >


Erectile Dysfunction (ED) in the Elderly
Devraj Munikrishnappa, M.D.

Obesity, smoking, television viewing and alcohol use are associated with higher risk of ED. Read more >


Acute Pulmonary Embolism
Christopher Kabrhel, M.D.

Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and potentially deadly disease, which occur when arteries become blocked, PE is part of a family of diseases that occur when veins become blocked. Read more >


Type 1 Diabetes - The Latest on New Insulins and Delivery Systems
Sheryl Merkin, M.S., F.N.P., C.D.E., Sharon Movsas, M.S., R.D., C.D.E. and Joel Zonszein, M.D., C.D.E.



Dealing with Chronic Pain: The Mind Body Solution
Hilary Tindle, M.D., M.P.H.



Acute Pancreatitis
Stephen J. Pandol M.D.



Smoking, Quitting and Genetics
Eric Siu, M.Sc., Nael Al Koudsi, H.B.Sc., Man Ki Ho, H.B.Sc., Rachel F. Tyndale, M.Sc., Ph.D

Nicotine's addictive properties are a result of the activation of the special receptors in the brain. Read more >


The Fight Against Diabetes
Sheryl Merkin, M.S., F.N.P., C.D.E., Sharon Movsas, M.S., R.D., C.D.E. and Joel Zonszein, M.D., C.D.E.

A lack of insulin or an inability to respond to insulin is known as "insulin resistance." Read more >


Human Papilloma Virus and Cervical Cancer
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

Modern medicine's battle against cervical cancer is a tale of two worlds. Read more >


A New Treatment for Lupus?
Elena Peeva, M.D., Liliane Min, M.D., and Peter Barland, M.D.



Bioartificial Kidneys: Potential Application in Renal Replacement
Frieda Wolf, M.D., and Eli A. Friedman, M.D.



Influenza and Pandemic Influenza: A Primer
Walter A. Orenstein, M.D.



How Sweet It Is: Sweeteners in Health and Disease
Edward Saltzman, M.D.



Consumer-Driven Health Care: Ethical and Legal Pitfalls

With health care costs continuing to grow at a much higher rate than inflation, some policy makers have seized upon yet another technique they hope will restrain spending — "consumer-driven health care" in the form of "health savings accounts. Read more >


The Detection and Management of Osteoporosis
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

Author's Note: I would like to thank Dr. Read more >


Dendritic Cell Cancer Vaccines
Woondong Jeong, M.D., Brier Rolando, M.D., and Robert G. Lerner, M.D.

Woondong Jeong is a hematology/oncology fellow, Brier Rolando is an internal medicine resident and Robert G. Read more >


Suicide Assessment, Intervention and Prevention
Morton M. Silverman, M.D.



For Seniors: What to Do About High Blood Pressure
Abbas Ali, M.D.



Vitamin E Supplementation: Should You or Shouldn't You?
Joel Mason, M.D.

Recently, there has been considerable media attention as to whether or not vitamin E supplementation is safe or helpful. Read more >


Beyond Insulin
Sam Engel, M.D.



Road Traffic Injuries: Can We Stop A Global Epidemic?
Lauren P. Giles, B.A.; Elisabeth S. Hayes, M.B.A.; and Mark L. Rosenberg, M.D., M.P.P.

The causes of RTIs have been established: excessive speed, consumption of drugs and alcohol, failure to use seatbelts and poor road design. Read more >


Female Infertility
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

Author's Note: The expert advisors for this article are James M. Read more >


Stress and Allergy
Rosalind J. Wright, M.D., M.P.H., and Sheldon Cohen, Ph.D

Have you ever noticed that sometimes when you're having a really tough day, you sneeze a lot and your skin feels itchier? It's not a coincidence, your emotions may have been the trigger. Read more >


Malnutrition in the ICU
Joel Mason, M.D. and Scott Epstein, M.D.



Off-Label Prescribing
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

Off-label prescribing, also known as unapproved use, is the physician practice of prescribing a drug or medical device for a purpose different from one of the indications for which the product is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Read more >


The Ethics of Embryonic Stem Cell Research
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

Numerous researchers tout the potential therapeutic benefits from human embryonic stem cells. Read more >


Depression in the Elderly
Rafi Kevorkian, M.D.

Insomnia, weight loss, rapid emotional swings, or slow walking and reduced physical activity may be signs of depression in the elderly. Read more >


Dry Another Day
Antigoni Triantafyllopoulou, M.D., and Peter Barland, M.D.



Stronger Seniors
Ambrose P. Ramsay, M.D.



Performance Enhancing Drugs in Sports
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.



Glaucoma: The Perils of High Pressure
Gary M. Levin, M.D.

Eye drops for glaucoma can cause depression. Read more >


Vitamin K: The Last Frontier in Vitamins
Edward Saltzman, M.D.

Vitamin K has been shown to protect blood vessels and bones. Green leafy vegetables are among the richest sourcesof vitamin K in the diet. Read more >


Getting the Lead Out - The News About an Old Problem
Sassan Farjami, M.D., Ogleh Nesheiwat, M.D., Carol Karmen, M.D., and Robert G. Lerner, M.D.

Sleep disturbances, restlessness, lethargy, memory loss and irritability can be signs of lead poisoning. Read more >


Scleroderma
Meggan Mackay, M.D., M.S., and Peter Barland



Hypertension in the Elderly: Too Little, Too Late
Abbas Ali, M.D.

Cut down on salt, alcohol and lose weight to help lower your blood pressure. Read more >


Fighting the Fad - Low Carbohydrate/High Protein Diets
Edward Saltzman, M.D.

Very low carbohydrate diets may be effective for some, but their long-term benefit remains questionable. Read more >


Male Infertility
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

If you have a low sperm count and are trying for a pregnancy, you should avoid hot tubs and saunas. Read more >


HIV/AIDS in Women
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

Anal sex carries a higher risk for HIV infection than vaginal sex. Read more >


Soy and Menopausal Health
Mark J. Messina, Ph.D.



The Latest on Emergency Contraception
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

After taking emergency contraception, women should avoid having unprotected sex until their next period begins. Read more >


Iron Deficiency Anemia: Risk, Symptoms and Treatment
Elizabeth M. Ross, M.D., L.D.N.

Spoon-shaped fingernails may mean you are iron deficient. Read more >


Genetic Counseling and Breast Cancer
Dharmen Patel, M.D., Lawrence Shapiro, M.D., and Robert G. Lerner, M.D.

Both women AND men can get breast cancer from inherited breast cancermutations. Read more >


Erythropoietin and Progressive Kidney Disease
Eli A. Friedman, M.D.

In a perfect world, every medical treatment would be backed up by solid science, that is, rigorous clinical trials. Read more >


Gallstones and Complications: Detection and Treatment
Nicole D. Simpson, M.D., Tommy Yen, M.D.,* and Aijaz Ahmed, M.D.



Malnutrition and the Cancer Patient
Robert M. Russell, M.D., and Joel Mason, M.D.

Before you begin chemo or radiation therapy, you may benefit fromaggressive nutritional support. Read more >


Frailty: Management and Treatment
John E. Morley, M.D.

Most frail persons should do resistance exercise training at least threetimes per week. Read more >


Public Health and Bioterrorism: Learning the Lessons of the Anthrax Attacks
Richard E. Dixon, M.D., and David J. Sencer, M.D., M.P.H.



"Tube Feeding" — Right or Wrong: The Medical, Legal and Ethical Issues
David E. Milkes, M.D.

Patients should not be on tube feeding unless they are expected to requireit for more than 30 days. Read more >


Carotid Artery Repair: Stent Or Scalpel?
Joseph G. Salloum, M.D., Morgan Campbell, M.D., and Richard W. Smalling, M.D., Ph.D.

Successful carotid artery surgery can reduce the risk of stroke. Read more >


Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome (CAPS)
Juan Javier Lichauco, M.D., Jayashree Sinha, M.D., and Peter Barland, M.D.



Burns: From Treatment to Prevention
Martin J. Carey, M.D.

Water heaters should be set below 120oF (49oC) to avoid scald injuries. Read more >


Reversal Therapy, a Better Treatment for Heart Disease
K. Lance Gould, M.D.

Cholesterol-lowering drugs are more effective than cardiac bypass surgeryfor the treatment of heart disease. Read more >


Adult Onset Still's Disease
Juan Javier Lichauco, M.D., Jayashree Sinha, M.D., and Peter Barland, M.D.



Good Health to Diet For: Blood Pressure and Nutrition
Robert M. Russell, M.D. and Paolo M. Suter, M.D.

Some people are "salt sensitive." If they increase their salt, they increase their blood pressure. Read more >


Prostate Cancer
Rami Y. Haddad, M.D.

Earky detection is important for prostate cancer. All men 50+ should havean annual digital rectal exam. Read more >


Hospice and Palliative Care
Manoj Mittal, M.D., and Joseph H. Flaherty, M.D

Sit the terminally ill patient upright if they're having trouble breathing. Read more >


Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): New Treatments for Mild and Severe
Elena Peeva, M.D., M.Sc., Gisele Zandman-Goddard, M.D., and Peter Barland, M.D.

SLE sufferers should not take sulfonamide drugs. Read more >


Sepsis
John E. Morley, M.D.

Older hospitalized patients are often given too little food. Read more >


Vitamin A, Retinoids and Carotenoids: What's the Bottom Line?
A dialogue between Robert Russell, M.D., and Joel Mason, M.D.

In the last three years, Dr. Read more >


Pain Free: Modern Drugs and Neuropathic Pain
Howard L. Fields, M.D., Ph.D.



Medical Abortion in Practice: An Interview
Tom Gilbert

To learn more about practical issues involving medical abortion, TheDoctor's Tom Gilbert, interviewed Jini Tanenhaus, Associate Vice President for the Clinician Training Initiatve, Planned Parenthood of New York City. Read more >


The Three M's of Medical Abortion — Mifepristone, Methotrexate and Misoprostol
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

An IUD must be removed before taking medical abortion drugs like RU-486. Read more >


The Anticoagulant Heparin: A Possible New Cancer Treatment?
Leo Zacharski, M.D., and Robert G. Lerner, M.D.

Heparin may be the most effective treatment for cancer patients with bloodclots in their legs. Read more >


Vertigo: Its Causes and Treatment
Huai Y. Cheng, M.D.



Giant Cell Arteritis
Peter Barland, M.D.

Always taper off steroid medications slowly, otherwise you risk upsetting the body's natural hormone production. Read more >


Genetics and Mental Retardation
V. Reid Sutton, M.D.



Wrongful Prolongation of Life?
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

Rebecca Jane Taylor suffered a stroke that left her paralyzed on one side and wheelchair-bound. Read more >


Dysphagia
M. Louay Omran, M.D.

Swallowing problems that come and go are usually caused by non-cancerousrings of tissue. Read more >


Can Diet Prevent Colorectal Cancer?: A Dialogue
Robert M. Russell, M.D. and Joel B. Mason, M.D.

Alcohol increases your risk of colon cancer. Read more >


Osteoarthritis
Yusuf Yazici, M.D., and Akgun Ince, M.D.

Strengthening exercises for the quadriceps can help relieve symptoms of knee arthritis. Read more >


"Time is Brain": Treating Stroke as an Emergency
Morgan Campbell, M.D.

Aspirin, taken every day (81-325 mg dose), can help prevent a stroke. Read more >


A Body to Die For: The ABC's of Eating Disorders
Kathryn J. Zerbe, M.D.

Recovering bulimics should protect their teeth by NOT brushing vigorously. Read more >


Got to Run: Travelers' Diarrhea
Gary M. Gray, M.D.

If antibiotics aren't stopping your traveler's diarrhea within three days, go see a doctor as soon as possible. Read more >


Bioterrorism - Scare Stories Can Be Dangerous to Our Health
Hillel W. Cohen, Dr.P.H., Victor W. Sidel, M.D., and Robert M. Gould, M.D.



Less is Less: the Undertreatment of High Blood Pressure
Eli A. Friedman, M.D.

If your doctor says your blood pressure is "a little high," you should betreated with anti-hypertensive drugs. Read more >


A New Treatment for Congestive Heart Failure?
Frank A. Laws, M.D., and Richard W. Smalling, M.D., Ph.D.



To Sydney and Beyond
Martin J. Carey, M.D.

If you are short of breath in the days following a long airplane trip, see a doctor ASAP. Read more >


Exercises for the Active Senior
John E. Morley, M.D.

Sit with legs extended and flex the trunk forward from the hips. Read more >


Sports Injuries and the Aging Athlete
John E. Morley, M.D.

Not long ago, a man named Al Hanna successfully reached the southern summit of Mt. Read more >


Losing Propositions: A Discussion of Popular Diets
Robert M. Russell, M.D., Edward Saltzman, M.D., and Helen Rasmussen, M.S., R.D.

Drinking sufficient fluids and taking in enough fiber are the keys tosuccessful weight loss. Read more >


Tuberculosis: The Comeback Bug
E. Neil Schachter, M.D.

Tuberculosis, the ancient killer, once known as the "White Plague," was, at least in wealthy, medically advanced countries, on its way to extinction, thanks to antibiotics. Read more >


Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
Gary M. Gray, M.D.

Tincture of opium may help relieve IBS symptoms when other medicines fail. Read more >


Bioterrorism — Are We Prepared?
Martin J. Carey, M.D.

For most of us, bioterrorism seems out there with alien invaders as something likely to occur on television but not in real life. Read more >


A New Way of Looking at Atherosclerosis
Felicita Andreotti, M.D., Ph.D., Ignatios Ikonomidis, M.D., Stefano Sdringola, M.D., and Petros Nihoyannopoulos, M.D.



More than a Little Heartburn: Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)
Gary M. Gray, M.D.

To reduce episodes of heartburn, avoid cigarettes,late night meals and alcohol and coffee in the evening. Read more >


Drowning and Near-Drowning: Prevention and Treatment
Dipak Chandy, M.D.

If swimming or boating, avoid all drugs and alcohol. Read more >


Pancreas Transplant: A Cure for Diabetes?
Eli A. Friedman, M.D.

Type 1 diabetics with kidney disease should strongly consider simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplant. Read more >


The 2000 Presidential Race: Where the Candidates Stand on Health Care Issues
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

With the American Presidential election just around the corner, we thought we'd take a look at the issues the two major party candidates have focused on. Read more >


Treating Anxiety and Depression
Kathryn J. Zerbe, M.D.

Even small amounts of caffeine in some at-risk individuals can precipitate or exaggerate anxiety. Read more >


Anxiety Disorders
Kathryn J. Zerbe, M.D.

Psychodynamic therapy works best with those who are curious to learn more about themselves and their inner thoughts. Read more >


Bottle Feeding And Ear Infections: A Formula For Disaster?
Craig Brown, M.D.



Coping with Menopause
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

At menopause, use a lubricant to help maintain a good sex life. Read more >


A Better Way of "Living" With Lymphedema
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

Answer: the lymphatic system. Read more >


Traumatic Aortic Rupture
Lynn Schrader, M.D., and Martin J. Carey, M.D.

Car crash victims who have difficulty speaking or swallowing may havea torn aorta, a life-threatening medical emergency. Read more >


Fibromyalgia: Real or Imaginary?
M. Nergis Alnigenis (Yanmaz), M.D., and Peter Barland, M.D.

A low-impact exercise program may help relieve the symptoms of Fibromyalgia Syndrome. Read more >


Sleep Apnea: The Noisy Killer
Ahmed Syed Ali, M.D., and John E. Morley, M.D.

If you are often sleepy during the daytime, you may have sleep apnea and should see your doctor. Read more >


The Graying of Society: Nutrition, Vitamins and Aging
Robert M. Russell, M.D., and Joel B. Mason, M.D.

The elderly need to drink at least 8 servings of water or equivalent liquids every day. Read more >


New Drugs for Type 2 Diabetes
Eli Ipp, M.D.

Sulfonylureas are among the least costly and most effectivemedications for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Read more >


The New COX 2 Inhibitors
Peter Barland, M.D.

Until recently, the drugs used for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), were introduced either through clinical observations or as a result of a lucky guess. Read more >


Managing Cognitive Dysfunction
John E. Morley, M.D.

Use of a hearing amplifier can stop a demented patient's screaming. Read more >


"Nutraceuticals": Do They Spell the End of FDA Regulation of Drugs?
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

The Pure Food and Drug Act was enacted in 1906 in response, in large part, to unscrupulous marketing of adulterated foods and of patent medicines lacking in efficacy and often containing addictive or harmful substances. Read more >


The Neurobiology of Depression
Juan F. Lopez, M.D.



Coronary Heart Disease in Women
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

Two common conditions that can produce chest pain and are frequently confused with angina are esophageal reflux disease and panic attacks. Read more >


Economic Motives for Physician-Assisted Suicide
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

The debate about physician-assisted suicide is replete with concern over the role of economic factors. Read more >


Male Menopause
John E. Morley, M.D.

A 73-year-old man fell while on a walking tour in the Venezuelan Andes. Read more >


Lasering the Heart When Coronary Bypass Isn't Possible
Ran Kornowski, M.D., and Martin B. Leon, M.D.



Sexual Relationships with Patients
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

Sexual relationships with patients are problematic, not only because they may be unethical and may compromise patient care, but because they may lead to civil actions for damages, criminal actions, and disciplinary proceedings by state medical boards. Read more >


Tobacco and Women: Trends and Strategies for Quitting
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

At the beginning of the twentieth century, if an American woman smoked a cigarette it was considered disgraceful behavior. Read more >


Emerging Treatments: Combination DMARDS for Rheumatoid Arthritis
Peter Barland, M.D.

Until recently, most patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were initially treated with NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents) or low doses of corticosteroids. Read more >


Vitamin Supplements — Too Much of a Good Thing?
Robert M. Russell, M.D., and Joel B. Mason, M.D.

A young woman who I recently treated, influenced by several reports in the local paper about beta-carotene's cancer and heart disease preventive benefits, began taking a single tablet of supplemental beta-carotene on a daily basis. Read more >


How to Handle the Heat
Martin J. Carey, M.D.

Our skin is the radiator of the car. It is the place where most of our cooling occurs. Read more >


The Response to Stress
Bruce McEwen, Ph.D., and Dean Krahn, M.D

What do we mean when we say we are "stressed out"? We may just be having a bad day, or feeling pressured by too many things to do and too little time to do them. Read more >


Emerging Issues: The Privacy of Medical Records
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

Within the past two years, a substantial amount of attention has been paid to the issue of the privacy of patient records. Read more >


What's New About Gout
Peter Barland, M.D.

Gout is a disease produced by excess uric acid, a nitrogen breakdown product, in the blood (hyperuricemia). Read more >


Emerging Treatments: Viscosupplementation for Osteoarthritis
Peter Barland, M.D.

Osteoarthritis should no longer be considered an inevitable accompaniment of aging but rather a dynamic and largely treatable disease. Read more >


How Best to Manage Your Asthma
E. Neil Schachter, M.D.

Though asthma medicine is not generally recommended for pregnant women, the greatest risk to the fetus is a mother's uncontrolled asthma. Read more >


Treating Parkinson's Disease: Appendix

Treatment of PD with levodopa was begun in 1960. Read more >


PVD: A Practical Approach to Promoting Healing
Caroline Fife, M.D.

Cold feet? Or are your legs often pale when elevated or red while hanging down?You may have the inadequate blood flow associated with peripheral vascular disease. Read more >


Acute and Chronic Colitis: Changing Causes and Therapies
Gary M. Gray, M.D.

Colitis is the irritation or inflammation of the colon. Read more >


Current Treatment for Sickle Cell Anemia
Robert G. Lerner, M.D.

For the past eight years, I've been treating a patient, I'll call him Rod. Read more >


The Human Genome Project: What It Means for You
James R. Lupski, M.D., Ph.D.

A mutation can be caused by a change in a whole chromosome or involve just one base pair of a specific gene. Read more >


Taking Osteoporosis Out of Your Future — A Major Challenge for Women
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

Balance exercise, like Tai Chi, can lessen the risk of falls. Read more >


Treating Parkinson's Disease
Ahmed S. Ali, M.D., and John E. Morley, M.D.

Dietary protein reduces the absorption of levadopa, a medication for Parkinson's, so the timing of mealsand medication should be different. Read more >


Urinary Incontinence
John E. Morley, M.D.

Incontinence, the inability to restrain the discharge of urine, is an extremely common and highly treatable disorder. Read more >


DHEA — The Fountain of Youth?
John E. Morley, M.D.

For reasons that are not totally clear, DHEA (dehyrdoepiandrosterone) has captured the public and scientific imagination as an anti-aging hormone. Read more >


Constipation in the Elderly
Ariba Khan, M.B.B.S., and John E. Morley, M.D.



Where's the Fat?
Eli Ipp, M.D.

We are constantly reminded to watch our weight. Read more >


How Much Protein Do You Need?
Robert M. Russell, M.D., and Carmen Castanada Sceppa, M.D., Ph.D.

Amino acid supplements are not digested and absorbed into the body as readily as amino acidscoming directly from food sources. Read more >


Folate: New and Exciting Clinical Implications of an Old Vitamin
Robert M. Russell, M.D., and Joel Mason, M.D.

The B vitamin, folate, has certainly come a long way in the 50 years since it was first identified and synthesized in the 1940s. Read more >


Lowering Your Cholesterol: Diet or Drugs?
Ernst John Schaefer, M.D., and< Robert M. Russell, M.D.

Smoking, hypertension and diabetes are the key culprits in hardening of the arteries. Read more >


Exercise, Nutrition and Health
Miriam Nelson, Ph.D., and Joel Mason, M.D.



Obesity: State-of-the-Art Update
Joel Mason, M.D., and Edward Saltzman, M.D.



Diet and Heart Disease
Robert M. Russell, M.D., and Alice H. Lichtenstein, D. Sc.

Alice H. Read more >


Current Treatments for Heart Attacks
Richard W. Smalling, M.D., Ph.D.

The most common symptom of a heart attack is chest pain; but sometimes,the pain starts in the arm, neck or back. Read more >


Emerging Treatments: Unstable Angina
Brian M. Go, M.D., and H. Vernon Anderson, M.D.

Calcium antagonists have been found to be very beneficial in preventing heart attacks inpatients with unstable angina who are unable to use beta blockers. Read more >


Why Doctors Use Echocardiography
Eddy Barasch, M.D.

Echocardiography is so sensitive that it can detect mild murmurs not otherwise heard, alerting your doctor to potential problems. Read more >


Can Bacteria Be Trained to Do the Kidney's Work?
Eli A. Friedman, M.D.

In industrialized countries, peritoneal- and hemo-dialysis sustain the lives of more than a quarter of a million patients whose kidneys don't work effectively (renal insufficiency). Read more >


When Kidneys Fail in Diabetes: Therapy Options
Eli A. Friedman, M.D.

Diabetes is a complicated and chronic disease that eventually destroys the kidneys. Read more >


Testicular Cancer
Robert G. Lerner, M.D.

Testicular cancer is the most common malignancy in young adult males. Read more >


Screening for Colorectal Cancer in Women: Not Just a Man's Disease
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

There is an odd perception that colorectal cancer (CRC) is a man's disease. Read more >


The Genetics of Breast Cancer
Susan C. Stewart, M.D.

Everyone of us has had a friend or relative concerned about their family history of breast cancer. Read more >


The Privacy of Genetic Information
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

Our ability to test individuals for genetic disorders is increasing dramatically. Read more >


Viagra® and Other Dilemmas of Enhancement Medicine
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

Lately, a number of my friends have told me that they are considering getting some Viagra®. Read more >


Informed Consent
Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D.

In the modern field of health law and bioethics, the doctrine of informed consent is about as classic a doctrine as we have. Read more >


Rewards and Addictions
Dean D. Krahn, M.D.

Drug abusers, alcoholics and overeaters may appear to be out of control but, actually, it's the opposite. Their brain chemistry, thrown out of balanceby substance abuse, is strongly dictating their behavior. Read more >


What We Know about Unhealthy Behaviors and How You Can Change Them
Dean D. Krahn, M.D.

We pride ourselves on our intelligence but we still engage in many unhealthy behaviors — eating and drinking to excess, smoking, abusing drugs. Read more >





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