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Diabetes Study May Point the Way to a Better Sex Life (for All Men)
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Diabetes Study May Point the Way to a Better Sex Life (for All Men)

 

A recent Australian study offers hope for diabetics who are having problems with their sex life. The study found a rapid reversal of sexual problems in highly overweight type 2 diabetic men who went on a two-month diet. The improvements lasted for an entire year.

There's no reason to think this couldn't work for all men who are carrying a few extra pounds.

The study was designed to test the effects of two short-term diets on the many metabolic problems, including sexual ones, that often accompany diabetes. Thirty-one obese diabetic males, average age 60, were placed on either a 1,000 calorie diet (19 men) or a high protein diet (12 men) that was low in fat and carbohydrate and designed to reduce calorie intake by 600 calories a day.

The study found a rapid reversal of sexual problems in highly overweight type 2 diabetic men who went on a two-month diet. The improvements lasted for an entire year.

The effects of the diets were tested at eight weeks. Subjects then continued with their diet or were switched to the high-protein diet for the next 44 weeks.

In just eight weeks, weight and waist size had dropped by 10% on the low calorie diet and by 5% on the high protein diet. And sexual problems, such as low desire and erectile dysfunction improved dramatically.

Similarly strong improvements in blood glucose, blood flow, LDL (bad) cholesterol and markers of inflammation were also found at eight weeks. But it was the sexual benefits that stood out the most.

At 52 weeks, the weight the men had lost remained off. Sexual desire continued to improve and even fewer men were suffering from erectile dysfunction.

The researchers emphasize that this all came about through one simple lifestyle change, not through a pill. They think that public health messages that focus more on the sexual benefits of losing weight will resonate better with men than messages on the cardiovascular and other health benefits do. And the message isn't just for diabetics.

Better sex. Is it worth going on a two-month diet? Sounds like something men might want to talk to their significant other about.

An article on the study was published online by the Journal of Sexual Medicine August 5, 2011. The article will also appear in a future print edition of the journal.

August 19, 2011






 


 
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